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Boxerlego

Short Axle Connection

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I've seen some topics suggesting the idea of cutting the axle to length when a axle is to small for the given axle connection by the axle connectors. Here is a simple example that show a 1-2mm gap that is between the axle and connector. What should you do in a situation like this?

axle01a.pngaxle01b.png

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It can be a small sacrifice to ones axles collection to cut down the size of their axles to make connections like so. But I dont want to cut my axle I want them to stay unaltered as much as I can. I've thought about using a little amount of JB-weld to give a some length to the axle... however dong this could make the connection much harder to put together.

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I don't understand your logic -- you would spend money on (expensive) JB Weld epoxy rather than sacrifice a few $0.02 Technic Axles?

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I would just move the top connection point one hole to the right and the bottom one hole to the left. Then two 4L axles will exactly fit! :wink:

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Could you use 1/2 lift arms to brace the two parts together?

Edited by Alasdair Ryan

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I don't see the problem. Why cut axles for a 1 or 2 mm gap ? I don't want to offend you, but that sounds ridiculous. Especially as in your examples, the #3 axles fits very well. You just have to make an assemby that fits the "system".

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I would say cut it, I don't see any other solution... I one time made myself a 3.5 mm axle by cutting a 4 mm axle.

Edited by nxtstep101

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It can be a small sacrifice to ones axles collection to cut down the size of their axles to make connections like so. But I dont want to cut my axle I want them to stay unaltered as much as I can. I've thought about using a little amount of JB-weld to give a some length to the axle... however dong this could make the connection much harder to put together.

JB-welding it would be much worse then cutting one of your axles down to size.

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I have cut axles to size. I try to build in such a manner as this is a rare event. I now am the proud owner of

1x 2.5L axle

1x 3.5L axle

1x 4.5L axle

4x 3L-2mm bars

The power of bricklink has changed my perspective on this behavior.

v/r

Andy

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What should you do in a situation like this?

Figure out a better solution, such as:

I would just move the top connection point one hole to the right and the bottom one hole to the left. Then two 4L axles will exactly fit! :wink:

Resorting to glue just seems lazy.

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^^^^

with a 11L beam.

Or if it's visual feature, then don't mind the gap.

Edited by Lipko

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Do you actually need the axle to span the whole distance, or do you just need something to plug the gap? If the latter, why not cut a piece of 3mm rigid hose to fill the gap? Or just roll up some small pieces of paper and stick them in one or both ends as spacers.

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I don't understand your logic -- you would spend money on (expensive) JB Weld epoxy rather than sacrifice a few $0.02 Technic Axles?

I don't want to rush to the option of cutting just yet.

I don't see the problem. Why cut axles for a 1 or 2 mm gap ? I don't want to offend you, but that sounds ridiculous. Especially as in your examples, the #3 axles fits very well. You just have to make an assemby that fits the "system".

The assembly fits the system no problem. The problem is the 1-2 mm gap because it allows some compression.

I have cut axles to size. I try to build in such a manner as this is a rare event. I now am the proud owner of

1x 2.5L axle

1x 3.5L axle

1x 4.5L axle

4x 3L-2mm bars

The power of bricklink has changed my perspective on this behavior.

v/r

Andy

Could you show pictures of the axles and a example of the situation that was the reason why you did it. Pictures in LDD would be great.

Resorting to glue just seems lazy.

Maybe your idea on how to use it, yes that would be lazy. But understand this, all I want to do here is "add" some length to the Axle so it can fit. I am actually suggesting something that is completely the "opposite" of cutting here.. Sure it is more expensive but man up about it if you going to start cutting here.

Do you actually need the axle to span the whole distance, or do you just need something to plug the gap? If the latter, why not cut a piece of 3mm rigid hose to fill the gap? Or just roll up some small pieces of paper and stick them in one or both ends as spacers.

I need something to fill the gap. That is the goal you could say. Also another goal is how fast can you restore the axle connector to original condition. The rolled up paper is what it is rolled up paper. It is a simple and practical. I've been thinking about it but; WOW I like thought of the 3mm rigid hose. It perfect and you don't haft to deal with the guess work of paper smashing. Nice Job! Thanks EdmanZA.

r100_3356.jpg

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I've seen some topics suggesting the idea of cutting the axle to length when a axle is to small for the given axle connection by the axle connectors. Here is a simple example that show a 1-2mm gap that is between the axle and connector. What should you do in a situation like this?

A diagonal member doesn't do anything to stiffen a box unless it has a fixed length. Any use of angle connectors with an axle can only resist compression; in tension they will pull apart. The compression direction stiffness is dependent on the axle bottoming out in the connector. If you want this to be strong in compression, an axle will have to be cut to fit tight. If you want this to be strong in tension, it will have to be bonded so it does not pull open. The only alternative is a fixed length diagonal like a beam, but that only works if your diagonal length happens to be an integral number of studs.

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Could you show pictures of the axles and a example of the situation that was the reason why you did it. Pictures in LDD would be great.

20121125151101813.jpg

This crawler axle required a 2.5L and a 3.5L axle to keep the desired track width.

My Texas tornado required a 4.5L axle in the gearbox input due to the even spacing of driving rings within the odd spacing of studless paradigm.

The location of the towballs in the Texas Tornado chassis and the desire to stop them from backing out meant that the bars that retain them had to be slightly shorter than 3L.

v/r

Andy

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Nice Job! Thanks EdmanZA.

Credit for this one should go to Jennifer Clark / Blakbird - it's a technique I saw used in their JS220 instructions.

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Here is a picture of the design I am working on that required the 3mm rigid hose in the Axle hole and the rigid hose works perfectly. I'm building a Monster truck and been working on it for some amount of time.

r100_3359.jpg_thumb.jpg

@EdmanZA: That is interesting. Thanks for sharing this technique and where you saw it. I think this technique is a very clever and unique to building. Definitely opens new connections up and the new possibilities of building. I want to use the words "resource effective" to describe this technique. Your not removing length from a $0.02 axle your just using a $0.005 piece of 3mm rigid hose to fill the gap.

@Blakbird: I do not plan to use the bond to strengthen any connections on the design. The liftarm 1x11.5 double bend is the main pillar of construction and is at the same 135 degree angle as the #4 axle and pin connector. The pin connections and liftarms will handle tension on the frame. The 3mm rigid hose will stiffen the Axle members and center certain nodes or modules on the Axle members so it will align with the studless paradigm. I want to tell you that this technique is intriguing. Was this technique something that was conjured around the studded parts?

@AndyCW: Thanks! I understand why the decision was made to cut the Axles to length and I want to point out that is right choice in your situation. You were using the axle as a axle, me on the other hand was using the axle as a structural member and more possible options are on the table here to make the desired length for the axle connection happen. I made a jig to ensure precision cuts were made on the 3mm rigid hose and that everything was centered and aligned properly.

Edited by Boxerlego

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That chassis looks really well built, are you going to make a different topic to show it off?

Thanks. Yes I will.

Edited by Boxerlego

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I've decided to make the custom length axles needed for the short axle connections and commit to the design. The 3 mm rigid hose was a very fast and good solution and has the benefit of not requiring the a group of custom length axle to make the desired length. Now here are two different size axles made from the #4 axle that fit with in the #4 and #3 axle. In the picture #4 axle is on top #3 axle is on bottom along with a axle connector with the notches to be a guide to define their size and the two axle in the middle are the custom length. The first custom length axle I made starting from the top is the #3.5 then below that is a #3.25 axle connection. The #3.25 axle length is able to make this connection here represented with the 1x11.5 liftarm double bend rsz_100_3497.jpg_thumb.jpg and was the beginning example in the OP. The #3.5 axle is used with a #5.5 custom axle on the monster truck frame to align certain nods up on the axle connectors with the studless uniform pattern. Understand that both of these custom axle connection form a isosceles right triangle.

rsz_100_3510.jpg

Edited by Boxerlego

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I want to metaphorically say this: that I am not the first person to run in to this wall. Many builders will stop at the wall that is before them. Me I dig in and start to climb the wall so I can see what is beyond.

I've made two octagons just because I build stuff and see it for myself. The first one is a unmodified design and the second one is a modified octagon. This is for you to see what is beyond that wall.

octagon.jpg_thumb.jpg

Unmodified octagon:org02.jpg_thumb.jpg org01.jpg_thumb.jpg org03.jpg_thumb.jpg

Modified octagon: mod02.jpg_thumb.jpg mod01.jpg_thumb.jpg mod03.jpg_thumb.jpg

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