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Zeya

Did Lego ever produce ceramic items?

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Sometimes in my eBay searches, I will come across ceramic items that are described with the word Lego. (Sometimes they are bowls or plates etc, and sometimes I've seen it pop up for porcelain statuettes.) Until today, I always assumed it was some sort of mistake or misspelling. Today, I found this item that has a clear photo of a logo on the bottom that says "Lego".

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Lego-Made-in-Japan-Pirate-Mug-/230794072539?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item35bc6611db#ht_1217wt_108

(Can't link the exact photo. See the very last photo for the logo and date.)

My best guess is there happened to be another company called Lego. This says Japan and 1960 on it. I looked up Lego logos on brickipedia and didn't spot this particular logo style either.

Anyone know about this?

I have a modern-day Lego mug, but that's clearly very different from this. :sweet:

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I think you are right with your suggestion: "My best guess is there happened to be another company called Lego. This says Japan and 1960 on it. I looked up Lego logos on brickipedia and didn't spot this particular logo style either."

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Very interesting, whilst a quick Google does not show who makes it, it certainly does confirm that there is a lot of it about, mostly it would seem in or from Japan? I even found a Porcelain LEGO Beville Tea set! There is even a porcelain LEGO ash tray with the image of a real LEGO Brick on it, I am pretty sure that is not the sort of thing TLG would make themselves though.

Edit. More info: A bit further reading finds that the company was based in New York and noted for doing collectable china stuff. Apparently the name is a shortened version of the company president. Seems that there is not too much information immediately to hand though.

Edited by Hrw-Amen

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Sometimes in my eBay searches, I will come across ceramic items that are described with the word Lego. (Sometimes they are bowls or plates etc, and sometimes I've seen it pop up for porcelain statuettes.) Until today, I always assumed it was some sort of mistake or misspelling. Today, I found this item that has a clear photo of a logo on the bottom that says "Lego".

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Lego-Made-in-Japan-Pirate-Mug-/230794072539?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item35bc6611db#ht_1217wt_108

(Can't link the exact photo. See the very last photo for the logo and date.)

My best guess is there happened to be another company called Lego. This says Japan and 1960 on it. I looked up Lego logos on brickipedia and didn't spot this particular logo style either.

Anyone know about this?

I have a modern-day Lego mug, but that's clearly very different from this. :sweet:

While this does not sound like what you are finding, one other way that Lego seems to pop up for ceramics lately involves a more recent ceramic texturing technique used by ceramic and clay working types. They use Lego bricks to stamp the stud patern into the clay or project. A friend of mine that operates a kiln recently came by and mooched a handful of old bricks to use in classes.

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According to this ebay auction,

It was made by Lego which is a Japanese company but I doubt is associated with the company that makes the Lego blocks.

This seems to mean that there is a Japanese ceramics company called Lego.

Edited by Sid Sidious

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According to this ebay auction,

This seems to mean that there is a Japanese ceramics company called Lego.

I thought they couldn't do that! I mean, such things tend to appear in Asia, but the same name of a registered trademark???

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The "LEGO" porcelian that shows up on the web is in no way related to the LEGO company.

It is an acronym of LEo GOldman Imports.

Lego Imports-Goldman Morgan

Lego Imports-Goldman Morgan's name represents a fusion of the first and last name of the company's president: Leo Goldman. Based in New York, the manufacturer is known for distributing a variety of collectibles, including bar accessories, figurines, and mugs. The company's head vases feature a paper label that reads: "Fine Quality Lego Japan."

It pretty much came about in the 1950's so there really was no real copyright issue then, and the name was made on the premise of using the company owners name and not copy the LEGO toy company's name.

Hope that is a good history lesson for all of you. :thumbup:

Edited by Polish Guy

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It pretty much came about in the 1950's so there really was no real copyright issue then, and the name was made on the premise of using the company owners name and not copy the LEGO toy company's name.

Hope that is a good history lesson for all of you. :thumbup:

Thanks. :sweet:

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LEGO started out as wooden toys in 1932. In 1949 they got the first injection molding machine, and plastic toys were added to the list. Then on February 4, 1960 the wooden toy factory/warehouse burned down, and wooden toys ceased production. Of the 4 Christiansen family members (men) who inherited the company from their father Ole Kirk Christiansen, the son Godtfred Kirk Christiansen who became managing director of the company in 1952, the decision to end toy production did not sit well with the other brothers. By the mid 1960s the other 3 brothers left the company with Godtfred Kirk buying them out. Big mistake on their part... now his branch of the family are billionaires, while the other 3 branches are not even millionaires.

But with old LEGO... if it's not made of wood or plastic, then generally it's not LEGO. However TLG did make some unusual items in the 1950s, such as 1:43 scale cars/trucks made of metal, wood and plastic, there was a LEGO cross made of a fluorescent plastic, a small LEGO gun that fires plastic bullets (hard to believe!).

Although over the last 80 years there have been over 35 LEGO logos (shown in Chapter 72 of my LEGO Collectors Guide DVD), the most common one used in the 1953-60 era was this one...

post-0-13378910876729.jpg

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The "LEGO" porcelian that shows up on the web is in no way related to the LEGO company.

It is an acronym of LEo GOldman Imports.

It pretty much came about in the 1950's so there really was no real copyright issue then, and the name was made on the premise of using the company owners name and not copy the LEGO toy company's name.

Hope that is a good history lesson for all of you. :thumbup:

Still kind of spooky that they do a Belville Teaset though, unless TLG named Belville after this as a sort of homage?

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Hi all,

Just trying to find out some information about a Lego money box I just picked up at a local fair. It is a ceramic military drum money box. It is stamped with the word Lego on the bottom - is it real Lego or a knock off?

It has a crest on one side which looks like an eagle.

We are trying to just find out a year etc, so when people ask we can give them the right story.

I can post a pic if it will help.

Cheers

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As I mentioned earlier... TLG did not make porcelain products... but they did make a LOT of wooden products from 1932 (Ole Kirk Christiansen was indeed a capenter)... until Feb. 4, 1960... when the wooden toy factory/warehouse burned down... and was never rebuilt.

1960 was the year that Ole Kirk's successor... son Godtfred Kirk decided that plastic toys were the way to go. This did not go over too well with his 3 brothers... Johannes, Karl Georg and Gerhardt. Eventually Godtfred bought out his 3 brothers, and went alone in the plastic LEGO production business. 2 of his 3 brothers created a wooden toy company called Bilofix... later Bilotoy... but that went under before the end of the decade. And today only the children of Godtred Kirk Christiansen are billionaires. The next generations of the other 3 brothers... not.

Here's a snapshot of the major LEGO logos for the last 80 years.....

8416002312_50d4ba33e4_b.jpg

First column top to bottom...

1934-44 LEGO logo (wooden toys)

1944-55 LEGO logo (wooden toys)

1952-55 LEGO logo (plastic toys)

1955-60 LEGO logo (wooden toys, until 1958 plastic toys)

1958-60 LEGO logo (plastic toys)

Second column top to bottom...

1960-72 logo (LEGO sets)

1971-72 logo (USA Samsonite LEGO sets) *

1973-98 logo (LEGO sets)

1998-Present logo (LEGO sets)

* - The reason for a 2 year unique LEGO logo for USA Samsonite sets was because TLG started litigation to revoke the Samsonite license in 1970 (due to underperformance by Samsonite), and Samsonite, knowing their days were numbered created their own LEGO logo from 1971-72 without the consent or blessing of TLG (which took over for USA LEGO production in 1973).

The history of LEGO products is found in Chapter 73 , and these are the main LEGO logos from among the 40 different LEGO logos in Appendix B... all as found in my Unofficial LEGO Sets/Parts Collectors Guide on DVD/download.

Edited by LEGO Historian

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