shiplover

USS Poseidon - Minifig Scale First Rate Ship of the Line

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Wonderful!!! amazing!!! great shiplover!! you've always been my favourite builder!!

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Lord Nelson would be proud to have this in his estate at Paradise Merton, if it weren't for the Yankee colors!  Are the lower decks finished and furnished, or is all the space needed for structural support?

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cross_view_4.jpg

On 6/9/2018 at 11:04 AM, icm said:

Lord Nelson would be proud to have this in his estate at Paradise Merton, if it weren't for the Yankee colors!  Are the lower decks finished and furnished, or is all the space needed for structural support?

Take a look back through the photos. It's fully finished on every level. Over 400 minifigs that you can't see from the outside except when you separate the ship into its three pieces. 

Edited by shiplover

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A question came about the masts in another forum. How do they remain stable with just a stack?  Simple, there are steel rods through the center. Although, after having completed the ratlines and the standing rigging, I bet they are not necessary. Similar but smaller rods run through the yards or they would never work. With the exception of those rods and having to modify a couple of parts for those rods, all the rest of the parts on the ship are connected in traditional manners without any modification. Only one part is glued and it had to do with the ships wheel. It simply would not stay put, although it connected traditionally. 

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On 9/12/2018 at 10:13 PM, mcflathead05 said:

Any suggestions?

Being your first ship(?), start smaller;)

But don't use prefab-hulls.
I would suggest a two-decker, way easier to figure out the height-width-proportion.
But the techniques you see on this beauty will work on any ship of any size, I guess. I especially like the division into several hull-sections connected via pins.

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Posted (edited)
On 9/12/2018 at 2:13 PM, mcflathead05 said:

This is an awesome looking Ship-of-the-Line!  I want to build one. Any suggestions?

 

J

Sorry for the late response, but I do have a few suggestions.  First, consider the time you have. Do you have the time to put something like this together? Second, consider the $. There are thousands of dollars in legos in this ship. If you think you have the time and the $, then its pretty simple going forward. If you don't have the time or $, follow the advice on the forum and just start smaller.

Here was my general approach.

(1) figure out a real life ship to pattern your building after and for a source of ideas. I chose the HMS Victory because its still around and there are many books with detailed pictures and diagrams for a non-sailing person like me to use. This was invaluable when building the ships ovens, the capstans, the anchors, the small boats, and many other detailed aspects of the ship. Of course, this can be just a model for ideas like it was for me, or it can be your end target. I had the proportions and specifications of Victory, but then I added significantly to the length and width of the ship I built because I wanted something larger at that scale than the Victory. I was shooting for something that would compete with the largest masted sailing ships ever built, which the Victory was clearly not. 

(2) figure out your scale. If you are shooting for minifig scale like I did, find one of the many websites that have already wrestled with this problem and offer solutions. If it's illusion scale or really no scale, don't worry about scale and just go for it.

(3) As soon as you have your model and scale, decide whether you are going to build the entire hull or a partial hull like I did. There are the obvious practical issues to consider of stability, cost, and appearance. This can have a tremendous impact on the cost and time to build your ship. If you look through the forum, you will see some amazing work on ship hulls that consumed so much time, the ships were never completed. With the size of my ship, I was concerned more about stability than anything. I felt I needed a good flat base for everything to rest on. That's why I selected the design I picked.

(4) I then recommend building a four or five inch cross section from the bottom of the hull up to the deck so you can test your basic design and figure out things like canon port size, mast size and design, yard size and design, the height of each deck and the hull, etc. I did this and found it extremely helpful. I tested several concepts. The canon port size and mast size are serious problems that are wrestled with anytime someone starts going bigger than the typical ships on the forum. This would be a good time to decide whether you are going to build your own cannons or go with lego's pre-built canons. While I really think some of the brick built canons on this site are amazing and really add the next level of realism, I decided to go with lego canons mainly on time and cost concerns. I needed over 150 canons so this was an important decision. 

(5)  Using your scale, calculate measurements at each deck on the ship, including at the first level of bricks. Put this on a piece of paper to reference and help keep you on track as you build up so you don't end up off track.

(6) layout the first level of plates and bricks and start building!

(7) Pay special attention to details that are important much later in the building. This is the real advantage of picking a real life ship to model your build after. For example, eyelets needed to be embedded low in the hull that were not necessary for years later when I was working on the rigging.  

I am very confident that every brick on my ship is the third, fourth, or sometimes even the tenth version of whatever I was trying to accomplish. The brickbuilt hull and especially the bow were built, rebuilt, rebuilt, rebuilt, and rebuilt many times to get to something that worked and looked right. After all of that, I rebuilt the bow at least twice after the hull was long complete and I was working on masts and bowsprit. Very early in the process I just accepted that everything I initially built was just the "test" build that almost always had to be redone. 

GOOD LUCK!

Edited by shiplover

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