Hinckley

TUTORIAL: Remove print from decorated elements

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You don't need Hydrogen Peroxide to clean the parts afterwards, because water is enough.

Whenever I use Brasso, I don't use hydrogen peroxide... Just a good wash with water and soap. :classic:

The tootpaste-way sounds interesting, does it depend on a certain brand or flavor?

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I have tried all three of the methods posted here. The eraser is the one I use as it seems to work on all parts and doesn't involve fiddling with washcloths and brasso. The toothpaste only suceeded in flavoring the minifig (:tongue:) and the brasso works very well but can be a little fiddly.

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I've just tried this with an erase away sponge like these on amazon on a damaged head. worked a treat - 30 seconds and the print was gone. Just the erase away sponge and water.

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Hey folks, just wondering, what's the benefit of using Brasso over just using some acetone with a Q-tip? The Brasso method seems pretty messy.

Acetone can destroy the plastic but that's only if you're dumb enough to use pure acetone and leave it on for too long (You can use pure acetone but you have to work really fast or it may discolor the plastic, not recommended). It also slightly takes off the shine, but that seems completely irrelevant since you're just going to be putting a decal over it.

I've used some Mr Clean scrubbing sponges to remove tampographs before and they have the same effect as the acetone but without the risk of wrecking the plastic, it just takes a little longer.

I guess it just depends on the materials available to you at the time, ey?

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Interesting point about the peroxide stopping the plastic from yellowing. I would imagine any mild abrasive would work in place of the brasso. I have had success using Jif (another abrasive liquid used for cleaning) on an old washcloth. I hadn't heard of the eraser method before - will have to give it a try!

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On the toothpaste subject, I used another brand that did not work. The one that did work felt gritty, much like Brasso. It must have some scrubbing agent/stuff in it.

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I can testify that colgate toothpaste doesn't work, even with an electric toothbrush for scrubbing, however, Jif cleaning product does.

Edited by loafofcheese

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Those magic erasers worked wonders on some heavily scuffed onion domes I bought second hand. They had black marks all over them that didn't come off with soap and water. A couple of buff of the sponge and they are good as new.

Edited by Cara

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I have found the best way for me is to use a fingernail buffing block. They come in all kinds of styles and work really well for removing print from bricks, also works well for removing just small sections of print.

For those of you that don't know, a buffing block is used to smooth and shine fingernails.

http://www.walgreens.com/store/c/studio-35-beauty-buffing-block/ID=prod6015848-product

They are super cheap also, I have picked up a few different styles of them, my favorite so far is a triangle shaped one from walgreens. I think it was 2.49.

Also what is nice about it is that the buffer is such a fine grit you can use a regular tape to cover what you want to keep and it won't wear through it.

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I have found the best way for me is to use a fingernail buffing block. They come in all kinds of styles and work really well for removing print from bricks, also works well for removing just small sections of print.

That's basically just sanding the print off? Albeit it is a super fine grain. I am not sure some perfectionist would love this method, lol...

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For the above, toothpaste does have different grit levels, much like sandpaper. Too high of grit in the toothpaste and it removes the stains from the teeth, but it also can remove the enamel..so it would probably work the same way for LEGO.

I know Arm & Hammer toothpaste has high levels, whereas most Colgate brands are really mild (which are actually better for your teeth in the long run, fyi). Just what I've read.

I've never thought to use it on a LEGO figure. I have used acetone before on an old castle figure and naturally it ate through the plastic haha. I haven't worked with brasso yet, but I will definitely look into this magic eraser type of sponge to see how that works.

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Magic erasers usually have a small amount of bleach in them which is how they remove stains. I don't think it's enough to hurt the Lego pieces though so it's probably a decent option.

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That's basically just sanding the print off? Albeit it is a super fine grain. I am not sure some perfectionist would love this method, lol...

That's what using toothpaste or Magic Eraser does as well.

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Does the Brasso works on new minifigs parts?

I bought a couple of torsos on Pick-a-Brick. When I put the Brasso on and I rub with a paper towel, the print was still perfect and the paper towel was still white.

Thanks!

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Does the Brasso works on new minifigs parts?

I bought a couple of torsos on Pick-a-Brick. When I put the Brasso on and I rub with a paper towel, the print was still perfect and the paper towel was still white.

Thanks!

You did not rub hard enough, long enough. A light application for a short time produces no noticeable result but if you go nuts for way longer than you think reasonable suddenly you will find the image disappearing. You also have to be pretty generous with the Brasso and I end up using at least two "dabs" of Brasso per torso.

Edited by tedbeard

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If you put am old rag on a table with a little bit if Brasso on it, and then put some weight in and rub in little circles, you can do a torso in less than 5 seconds. And the surface will still look nice and shiny:)

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Has anyone tried any of their methods out on clear parts?

The 4 x 8 cone half only comes in trans-clear with various prints that I would like to remove.

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For the above, toothpaste does have different grit levels, much like sandpaper. Too high of grit in the toothpaste and it removes the stains from the teeth, but it also can remove the enamel..so it would probably work the same way for LEGO.

I know Arm & Hammer toothpaste has high levels, whereas most Colgate brands are really mild (which are actually better for your teeth in the long run, fyi). Just what I've read.

As a dentist in a former life i can give a professional agreement to the Lego Dr! (Mebbe I should change my avatar name to LEGO Dentist?) yes Arm & Hammer as advertised as a baking soda toothpaste has small amounts of soda in the mix - this grittiness is what wears stuff away

Now you'd have to go some to knock off significant amounts of enamel on a one off or using it gently/sparingly/occasionally but no I wouldn't recommend anyone using it 3 times per day, every day for years and years - that would strip a good chunk of someone's precious enamel !

Having said that if you're guzzling fizzy drinks - especially diet ones which are super acidic you'll be dissolving the enamel away anyhow so what's a bit of gritty toothpaste amongst friends? (And don't get me started on fruit teas... Hot acidic liquid all over your teeth!? Definite 2 thumbs down)

Much love and don't have nightmares kids!

Edited by nine09nueve

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Has anyone tried any of their methods out on clear parts?

The 4 x 8 cone half only comes in trans-clear with various prints that I would like to remove.

I have used brasso to remove scratches from old 80's canopies, it works quite well for that, so I would think it will do for removing print as well.

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Hmm toothpaste works just as well you say? How can you check the grit level on toothpaste?

Also by magic eraser do we mean the kneaded eraser types that a sketch artist might use to remove pencil from paper? If so how long does this method take over either Brasso or toothpaste?

Though I am more apt to try the toothpaste as it seems the least hassle-inducing procedure to go through.

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Wait... Toothpaste works? What have I been doing with my life?! How didnt I know?

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Hmm toothpaste works just as well you say? How can you check the grit level on toothpaste?

Also by magic eraser do we mean the kneaded eraser types that a sketch artist might use to remove pencil from paper? If so how long does this method take over either Brasso or toothpaste?

Though I am more apt to try the toothpaste as it seems the least hassle-inducing procedure to go through.

magic eraser is some kind of very brittle sponge.

it does basicly the same as a fine sand paper.

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magic eraser is some kind of very brittle sponge.

it does basicly the same as a fine sand paper.

Thanks! I'll be looking for a magic eraser too then heh heh.

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