Gray Gear

[MOC] Low Friction Turntable - I need some Help!

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Hi everyone,

I have not posted here for a while because I moved to more system based MOCs. But now i built this Turntable as part of my newest MOC, and i need some help.

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10.0%20Turntable.png

As you can see I have completed the Turntable, and it works very well with very little Friction. The Part I need help with is with the electronics:

 I need some recommendations for a electric Motor to put in the base to keep the Turntable spinning very slowly.

The motor should both be extremely quiet, have a low rpm output (100 rpm would be perfect) and small enough to fit into this MOC.

The motor does not need to have a lot of torque or power, the input is geared down with a worm gear already.

I don't know how to supply power yet, I would like it best if I could use some kind of Power adapter to plug into the power outlet. But idk if this is possible.

 

As you can probably guess I am beginner in this field, but the Bricks for the MOC have already been ordered, so there is no turning back! Any Pointers would be apprechiated.

 

This is the whole MOC, a display figure of Goblin Slayer and Priestess from the Goblin Slayer Series.

11.0%20Base%20Whole.png11.0%20Base%20Whole%202.png

Thanks in advance,

Gray Gear

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I think that the best option is a synchronous motor. Some of them are powered directly from outlet and rotate at around 5 rpm. They are typically used in microwaves, rotating the platter. Very quiet too. Just google "5 rpm synchronous motor".

I have used it successfully in a MOC (clock tower), here you can see the speed:

The only thing to figure out is to find the best way to connect lego axle or gear to motor shaft. Simple glue will do if you don't mind gluing bricks. Also, you will need a cable with outlet plug and preferably on/off switch. Should be available in any hardware store. Finally, 230V is no joke so obviously all connections must be secure and not exposed.

 

Very Cool MOC!

Edited by Davidz90

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I think that turntable is overnginnered for such a small MOC. Having said that a simple PF M motor coupled to a 5V power supply should do a trick.

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Perhaps an old Lego micromotor could work well here? You probably don't need something that small, but it has the low speed/low torque/small size characteristics you're looking for

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12 minutes ago, 2GodBDGlory said:

Perhaps an old Lego micromotor could work well here? You probably don't need something that small, but it has the low speed/low torque/small size characteristics you're looking for

They have a reputation for failing. Not sure whether it would be wise in something running continuously.

I would use an M motor at low power.

You might also consider a second gear driving on the other side.

Edited by aeh5040

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2 minutes ago, aeh5040 said:

They have a reputation for failing. Not sure whether it would be wise in something running continuously.

I would use an M motor at low power.

Yeah, I guess it depends how continuously he wants it running, but if he's hoping to use wall power, you're probably right to assume that it'll be pretty continuous, so it might not be a good idea to use such an expensive, potentially fragile, motor anyways.

Sariel often used 71427 motors in applications where he wanted to keep sound down, so you could try them, but it looks like it would require rebuilding your base to fit it.

M-motors are the obvious choice, but they're not the quietest, so I guess it depends how important that is to you. Running at lower voltage could help with that, though

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No idea how much space you have left for the motor.

If there is enough, I'd use the smallest PoweredUp motor >with tacho< (e.g. #88008), any PoweredUp hub, and connect that to a 9 V power supply (or use rechargeables).

Then I'd use the SetSpeed command in a very simple PUp program (Start, SetSpeed, End) - and use the "speed" which fits - the speed value (lets say 5 out of 100) will be regulated rather precisely, regardless of friction losses or whatever. Could be used as a clock :pir-laugh:

I am using this on my train turntable and a rather heavy BB BR89 - she crawls nicely along the track, curves or not.

Best,
Thorsten

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Thank you all for your Ideas

I would like this to turn very slowly on my desk, like, in a always on scenario. Thats why I need something silent, like really silent. I doubt any LEGO/LEGO alternative motors will be suitable.

@2GodBDGlory Yeah that base is overbuilt for sure, I got a bit carried away. I got no problems rebuilding the base completely it if the engine placement requires it.

@Davidz90 What you posted sounds along the lines of what i need. How loud is the motor? In the video i couldn't hear anything. Also, is there some sort of power converter needed? i cant imagine the Motor will just plug strainght into the wall outlet somehow lol.

 

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7 hours ago, Gray Gear said:

What you posted sounds along the lines of what i need. How loud is the motor? In the video i couldn't hear anything. Also, is there some sort of power converter needed? i cant imagine the Motor will just plug strainght into the wall outlet somehow lol.

The motor is almost inaudible, way quieter than Lego ones. There is no power converter, it really plugs straight into the outlet! Power consumption is 4 watts, the amount of torque is enormous. Also, it is slightly more bulky than Lego ones - basically a pancake slightly larger than 40t gear, 2 bricks high (4 bricks with motor shaft). It is buried inside my clock so I can't take photos.

Edited by Davidz90

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My 9v motor is very quiet but it has very low torque

it's 4x5x3L I belive

Edited by SNIPE

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Even it is still little expensive in bricklink you can use spike essential's small angular motor.

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On 11/18/2023 at 11:26 AM, Lego Tom said:

That is intriguing as hell!

I thought the same.:D It is fantastic for small MOCs!

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Any 9V/12V LEGO motor run at lower voltage will be much more quiet and have lower RPM (and torque). A train controller is perfect for this job (the one with the yellow knob)

Cheers,

Ole

Edited by 1974

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