Pizzasemmel

Angled beam and technic bricks - one plate offset

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Hey all,

in one of my mocs I need an angled connection of 2-3°.

This is one of the solutions I came up with, comes out at ~2,3°

667742243_technicslope1.thumb.PNG.b2cd1817927eaed256282362d63ced31.PNG

stud.io does not detect a collision, it goes together very smoothly in reality.
Mathematically speaking it is 10,008 studs instead of 10.

How illegal do you deam this?

 

Edited by Pizzasemmel

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Well, I ain't the police, but I expect it is fine. The only real question is whether or not such a technique could be used in an official set, and I think it could. Sometimes installing parts requires a temporary slight bend, and sometimes Lego will put up with a slight bend on a part. If you want to make it slightly more legal, you could try using frictionless pins on both ends. Lego seems to think that their extra slack allows for slight bend, as in the long pointy panels on the front of the Volvo dumper.

At the end of the day, though, I don't care a bit about whether a technique is legal.

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Tested with the studless beams on both sides of the studded to prevent a test axle from just racking to the side. In your configuration an axle drops through without any friction. Whatever difference there is seems to be less than legos own tolerances so there isnt any argument to be had for it being illegal. A 2 plate offset gives enough friction to hold the axle from dropping out but still its very light friction. A full brick is quite tight and definitely feels forced, would likely be bending whatever you have supporting the studded beams.   

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TLG sometimes has even more significant "level drops" by just using the axles or frictionless gray pins which have less diameter than regular black pins due to absence of friction lines. 

As a fresh example I can recall 42110 Defender's a-pillars. They don't preciselly match but legally attached using both variants above. 

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13 hours ago, markaus said:

Tested with the studless beams on both sides of the studded to prevent a test axle from just racking to the side. In your configuration an axle drops through without any friction. Whatever difference there is seems to be less than legos own tolerances so there isnt any argument to be had for it being illegal. A 2 plate offset gives enough friction to hold the axle from dropping out but still its very light friction. A full brick is quite tight and definitely feels forced, would likely be bending whatever you have supporting the studded beams.   

Thanks for your feedback. I like the criteria with the axle and the beam being on both sides.

11 hours ago, Void_S said:

As a fresh example I can recall 42110 Defender's a-pillars. They don't preciselly match but legally attached using both variants above. 

Well, that sounds official to me :)

7 hours ago, Gray Gear said:

I don't get the point of this thread. You tested the connection irl, it worked well, end of story.

For me part of the fun of mocing is being restricted by the same set of rules as most of us and trying to build the most accurate represantation / model of something within these rules.
And not everything that is possible with Legos irl is also agreed upon to be legal.

So since these "rules" are the communities interpretation of what TLG does and does not, and I was wondering about a certain edge case, I asked the community. That was the point of this thread.

Have a nice weekend everybody

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