ks6349

How do those people create MOC?

Recommended Posts

Do they have a program or software which will help them create the basic structure of the desired result or do they just create on their own starting from zero?

I always want to try to create something different because even with 3in1 creator sets, which come with three designs and instruction booklets it doesn't take too long to get tired, and then, all I can do is to either dissemble them and put them away, or to put it on my desktop as a decoration...

I have spent quite some time and effort trying to create a different building on my own but I could hardly build anything

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Knowledge of parts and experience at building. It's like anything creative, without practice and trying out different techniques, someone's MOCs are not likely to be very interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not quite a master builder, but I usually just build either something randomly from the parts that I have, or build something that I have a vision of in my head. For far bigger projects I (sort of) make digital model and then based off it, I create the thing in real life.

 

But like @MAB said, experience is important, knowledge of parts, building techniques and all that. :pir-huzzah2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I build MOCs using a knowledge of parts and what they can do, with a little bit of experimenting and getting things wrong/seeing something explode because the parts were not going to stay connected the way I used! I have a shape in mind that I want to achieve and build from that; filling it in with the parts that will create that shape. 

I takes some practise and always pushing past failure/disappointment. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with @MAB and @Jack Sassy. There is something else, though, I believe. It is the way you "store" your models.

Just my personal view: When your sets are assembled, nothing much will happen, creativity-wise.

On the other hand, when you have a box full of >parts< of several models, ideally so many, that you can't "see" the individual models anymore - creativity may pop in there. I am convinced it will. But that requires to simply give up the "model" idea of LEGO. The original idea of LEGO was not to collect, but to build. It may very well be, that they switched to "please collect, as we can make more money that way" - or - because creativity is not in the forefront anymore. Who knows. You know, 18+ and such. And only very limited "smart" simply piece sets. Bricks and bolts and so on. 

Furthermore: "Just do it". Sounds dumb; this is my personal experience. Put something together - and take it apart again. Learn to like the building experience. Learn to like your MOCs.

"Later on": When you have all these pieces at increasing numbers in your "box" ... maybe sort them. That may result in "knowledge" on parts. Others (as me) may like the box, or boxes. You know, when the box count goes up ... or the one box gets bigger and bigger, MOCs will appear by your imagination.

And just don't judge your MOC against others. >Never<. Your MOC is your MOC. It is all that counts.

Best
Thorsten 

Edited by Toastie
Beer, wine, Captain Morgan, family all here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Practice, start small, don't try and make some huge building at first. Also I find it helps to just concentrate on certain sections at a time then join them together. Like just build a simple one room cabin first.

Other than that it does help to be able to visualize your design first, I have even sketched the basic shape out on paper, don't worry to much about details at first. Tear it apart and try again, lol.

Anyway that's how I do it. There are software programs available but as far as I know they don't actually show you how to assemble bricks and I don't use them anyway. 

Practice and look at what others have done, experiment with different parts and have fun, best advice I can offer.

 

Edited by Johnny1360

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Johnny1360 said:

Practice, start small, don't try and make some huge building at first. Also I find it helps to just concentrate on certain sections at a time then join them together. Like just build a simple one room cabin first.

Other than that it does help to be able to visualize your design first, I have even sketch the basic shape out on paper, don't worry to much about details at first. Tear it apart and try again, lol.

Anyway that's how I do it. There are software programs available but as far as I know they don't actually show you how to assemble bricks and I don't use them anyway. 

Practice and look at what others have done, experiment with different parts and have fun, best advice I can offer.

 

The biggest problem is- for example, I have a general idea of what a building I want to build, but it is normal that my direct human sense is to put a base plate, build a few walls, and then the ceiling, I cannot think of how I can use the bricks to implement the idea in my mind. When I look at the instruction booklets of a commercial set, I don't understand how the designer could think of all those complicated steps and details to create the buildings step by step

 

 

Edited by ks6349

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is something that comes with time and why I say practice, there is no substitute for experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, ks6349 said:

The biggest problem is- for example, I have a general idea of what a building I want to build, but it is normal that my direct human sense is to put a base plate, build a few walls, and then the ceiling, I cannot think of how I can use the bricks to implement the idea in my mind. When I look at the instruction booklets of a commercial set, I don't understand how the designer could think of all those complicated steps to create the buildings.

 

 

Consider looking at real-life buildings or objects and think about what pieces would fit best to recreate those buildings or objects, then think about what techniques you would use to make sure all pieces are where they need to be. I often do this in my free time or when I'm bored, on the bus, at the supermarket, wherever. It's recreating what you see before coming up with things of your own. Many art classes will have you painting or drawing real life objects or people before you get to make things up.

But yeah, it's pretty much just build, build, build and you'll discover neat techniques and unexpected uses for otherwise inconspicuous pieces.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you don't want to go through the added time of sorting sets, start with alternate builds, also adds the challenge of a limited parts availability (especially on smaller sets).

LEGO used to put alternate models on the box, eventually they stopped doing that, but there's still the 3-in-1 theme (which sometimes even has a 4th or 5th downloadable instruction) which can serve as inspiration.

I'm always surprised when I build a set, how much sideways building there is, and how cleanly hidden away those weird colored parts usually are , but don't let colors limit creativity.

I remember when most basic LEGO was just a few colors, and nowadays it's pretty daunting with the much larger color palette, but unless you strictly want a model in 1 color, use the colors for creativity.

Also don't feel bad if a building doesn't have some details like stairs/ladders/closed back etc , those all take more parts/size on a build, but unless it's a direct goal, start simpler with some imagination.

 

I do sometimes have a hard time with the thought of mixing many sets in a pile (pretty much gotta accept they won't be the original set anymore for a long time, because imagine 5 MOC made out of 10 set, and having to take em all apart to build 1 of the sets again), so that's how I started my MOC's with alternate builds of single sets first. 

 

Edited by TeriXeri

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think learning to build the 1980s sets' alternative models is a good starting point.  There are no instructions for them, just a picture on the box.  If you can create a model from a picture, you can also create from an image in your mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, ks6349 said:

I cannot think of how I can use the bricks to implement the idea in my mind. When I look at the instruction booklets of a commercial set, I don't understand how the designer could think of all those complicated steps and details to create the buildings step by step

Perhaps a browse through Flickr, Pinterest etc. might help you finding new techniques. I've been searching for a good brick-built hull bow technique for a long time now, I've found few, but nothing that I could combine to make an ultimate idea of mine.

17 hours ago, Toastie said:

"please collect, as we can make more money that way"

That truly does hurt, but I couldn't agree with you even more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could always start by MODing a set. I’m not much of a MOCer, certainly nothing on a large scale. But the one building I did was built around a window build I saw that I really liked. I do some, small simple stuff to add details to my city that’s all based on things I see. That’s another place to start. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, TeriXeri said:

If you don't want to go through the added time of sorting sets, start with alternate builds, also adds the challenge of a limited parts availability (especially on smaller sets).

LEGO used to put alternate models on the box, eventually they stopped doing that, but there's still the 3-in-1 theme (which sometimes even has a 4th or 5th downloadable instruction) which can serve as inspiration.

I'm always surprised when I build a set, how much sideways building there is, and how cleanly hidden away those weird colored parts usually are , but don't let colors limit creativity.

I remember when most basic LEGO was just a few colors, and nowadays it's pretty daunting with the much larger color palette, but unless you strictly want a model in 1 color, use the colors for creativity.

 Also don't feel bad if a building doesn't have some details like stairs/ladders/closed back etc , those all take more parts/size on a build, but unless it's a direct goal, start simpler with some imagination.

 

I do sometimes have a hard time with the thought of mixing many sets in a pile (pretty much gotta accept they won't be the original set anymore for a long time, because imagine 5 MOC made out of 10 set, and having to take em all apart to build 1 of the sets again), so that's how I started my MOC's with alternate builds of single sets first. 

 

which sometimes even has a 4th or 5th downloadable instruction?????

which 3in1 sets have a 4th or 5th instruction????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/9/2021 at 3:46 PM, ks6349 said:

The biggest problem is- for example, I have a general idea of what a building I want to build, but it is normal that my direct human sense is to put a base plate, build a few walls, and then the ceiling, I cannot think of how I can use the bricks to implement the idea in my mind. When I look at the instruction booklets of a commercial set, I don't understand how the designer could think of all those complicated steps and details to create the buildings step by step

Thats a perfectly fine way to start. I think most builds start off rough and simple and are refined, changed and added to as it progresses. Starting off with a rough build of just baseplate and walls is perfectly normal, you gotta start somewhere. Then along the way you can polish it up, try all sorts of connections and additions. Not every change will be what you want but you don't know unless you try and you'll discover a lot along the way just by trying things out and putting pieces together. Having a vision in your head, an idea of what you want to create is the start. Sit there with your pieces and think of what you can use, what pieces in what combination will achieve your vision.

Edited by koalayummies

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find that a lot of AFOLs who are set builders don't MOC because they are paralyzed by a fear of not being able to build well right out of the gate.

They see incredible MOCs at Eurobricks, via Flickr or Instagram, through their LUGs, or at conventions and say to themselves "I'll never be as good as these builders, why bother?".

They forget that everyone has to start somewhere, including some of the best MOCers in the world, and that there is no magic ability to suddenly be a good builder without the experience gained through actual MOCing.  Every MOCer produces duds all the time, but it's the knowledge of learning what doesn't work that allows for the discovery of what does work.  This process also involves learning what one enjoys building, which leads to each builder adopting a style that best fits them.

This is also why I encourage people to join LEGO rolebuilding games ad nauseum, especially new builders.  The games are safe environments to learn, where fellow players are highly encouraging and constantly provide constructive feedback.  On top of that, because part of the focus of most games is to tell stories as well as earning high scores, it takes some of the pressure off MOC quality if your priority is to tell a narrative.  As you build for the game, your skills as a MOCer will naturally improve over time.

I'm just going to paraphrase what has already been said: just MOC.  Don't worry about being good.  That will come naturally if you keep MOCing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, ks6349 said:

which sometimes even has a 4th or 5th downloadable instruction?????

which 3in1 sets have a 4th or 5th instruction????

Not all sets have them but Brickset has most of the links to official instructions if available.

I won't list all the 3-in-1 but here are some.

 

31088: Deep Sea Creatures - Whale

https://www.lego.com/cdn/product-assets/product.bi.additional.extra.pdf/31088_X_Whale.pdf

31073: Mythical Creatures - Snake

https://www.lego.com/cdn/product-assets/product.bi.additional.extra.pdf/31073_X_Mythical Snake.pdf

 

31058: Mighty Dinosaurs even has multiple extras : 

https://www.lego.com/cdn/product-assets/product.bi.additional.extra.pdf/31058_X_31058 4th Model.pdf - Brontosaurus

https://www.lego.com/cdn/product-assets/product.bi.additional.extra.pdf/31058_X_Dino Island Recon Plane.pdf - Airplane

https://www.lego.com/cdn/product-assets/product.bi.additional.extra.pdf/31058_X_Green Ankylosaurus.pdf - Ankylosaurus

https://www.lego.com/cdn/product-assets/product.bi.additional.extra.pdf/31058_X_Scary Scorpion.pdf - Scorpion

 

 

Edited by TeriXeri

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, TeriXeri said:

Wow, that's why I didn't know. I never buy those creatures set. I only buy buildings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ks6349 said:

Wow, that's why I didn't know. I never buy those creatures set. I only buy buildings

I think maybe buying a range of different sets may also help expand your creativity. For me, I've never seen the appeal of buildings and mainly focus on vehicles. That's why when building mocs, spaceships are so easy to do as you can build something quite small rather easily by just using some triangular plates etc. I think it's easy to forget that mocs do not have to be grand, refined structures. It is okay just to build one room of a building rather than a complete structure, most of us don't have the pieces to build much more than that unless you actively buy sets for the parts rather than to display

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I generally start out with a rough idea of what i want to build but let the pieces decide how its going to end up. 

Like i wanted to build the major set pieces from The Martian. The rover the habitat Mav. The habitat ended up being about x4 the size from the movie. The rover ended up with more tires. I mean, rough ideas can go a long way. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

shipsmall.jpg

I built that when I was 13. Look at it.

Look at the rainbow colours. Look at all the old bricks and the actual clone brand parts (we were poor. No word of a lie. That is why I defend cheaper brands.)

This was a build I was proud of at the time and I look at fondly now. I was so proud that I had worked out how to make the prow into a point instead of just square. And using the paper to make a sail. I even made sure the backdrop had a sun and cloud and was the right colour to be the sky!

Practice, don't let other things that builders create get you down. Everyone has something cool to build and share with the community. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing wrong with a build that is BOLOCs (built of lots of colours). I think most younger kids learn that way. I still do it if I don't have the right part in the right colour when trying something out. If you are testing form and function, colour is irrelevant. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was an story I heard about a pottery class where the teacher divided the class into two groups: group A was instructed to create a single vase and their grade would be judged by the quality of it. Group B was instructed to create as many vases as possible, and they would be graded simply by the total weight of their vases. At the end of the class the teacher brought in a scale, and weighed the vases of the group B and graded them. Then came the time to give grades for the group A, and it turned out that they all failed miserably, everyone getting a poor grade and none of them having made vases half as nice as the students in the other group. The moral of the story is that the students in group B created and created, vase after vase, but in doing so they got really good at making vases so by the end their vases turned out really nice. The group A on the other hand, spent most of the time theorizing how to make a perfect vase, and never getting anything properly their hands dirty and actually practicing the skill, so they ended up with very poorly made vases if anything.

So, like others have said, practice is the key. You will learn the limitations of your parts, you will learn how to use them best and eventually you'll be able to turn the vision in your head into reality. Also, remember that it doesn't have to be perfect and your personal enjoyment is what matters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking as a MOCist myself, I think there is no direct answer to this question. I believe, like with pretty much any art from, some people will just naturally have a talent towards it, but anyone can become good at it with a bit of time and practice. 

As for how I make my MOCs, I just do everything off the top of my head. I come up with an idea and a basic outline of how I would build it (what parts I would use, etc) in my mind, and then just start building. Sometimes, the result doesn't satisfy me, and I just scrap the build and try something else out. 

One thing I would recommend for beginners though, would be looking out for inspiration from what other people have built. But don't ever compare yourself to them and how "you'll never be as good as them", just do your own thing, by developing your own unique style. If everyone had the exact same skill level, everyone's builds would look pretty identical to each other... which would be pretty boring if you ask me. 

As far as I am concerned, I can't say that I have any special talent or anything, but I can definitely say that I have improved over time. For instance:

This was my first Mermaid MOC I built all the way back in 2018. Looking at it now, I feel pretty embarrassed:

image

However, as time when on, and my building skills advanced, I attempted making another Mermaid MOC in 2020, and this was the result:

image

The difference between the two is pretty staggering... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.