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Grover

Brewery at Prenmôr

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Posted (edited)
Spoiler

I attempted this in the ancient dialogue style to try and make the long explanation of medieval brewing more interesting.  Hopefully you enjoy it!

These events take place just before Book III Challenge V, all of the Varlyrio Rego turmoil.

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After the castle forge was completed, attention was turned to the brewery.  Many castles had a small brewery, but Lady Gwenllian had planned a large facility located prominently in the inner ward next to the kitchen since it would be a significant source of her household income.  The structure sat directly over a small fissure that had been excavated into a makeshift cave that allowed for a climate-controlled fermentation area.  Like the blacksmith shop, it would eventually form part of the inner curtain, so the roof was built to slope only one direction.

The brewery had been completed just before Ambassador Gisela was to leave for her journey back to Varlyrio to avenge the attempt on her brother's life.  Lady Gwenllian wanted to tour Gisela through the brewery before she left, and they now walked to the large new building.

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As they entered the finished brewery, Lady Gwenllian showed Gisela around.  Mohatu stood guard outside under the pentise, having learned to trust Lady Gwenllian as much as his training would allow.

Looking around, Gisela noticed that someone had filled barrels with water and grain, but no one was around aside from several terriers that scurried about.  "Might I ask who you have found to brew, m'lady?" Gisela asked.  "I have not seen any new servants, and I see no one here."

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Lady Gwenllian laughed.  "I myself am brewing."

Gisela raised her eyebrows, but had learned not to be surprised by her liege.

"Brewing was my family's business, so I am well versed and I will have to do the work myself until I can train a brewmaster," Lady Gwenllian replied.

Gisela bowed her head.  "As you will, m'lady."

"How familiar are you with brewing?" Lady Gwenllian asked.

"Not particularly.  Could you please explain it?  I would be remiss if I did not understand the intricacies of my community's largest industry," Gisela replied.

"Of course," said Lady Gwenllian.  "The first ingredient is the grain.  The best is barley, but almost any grain can do.  Oats are the second choice.  Wheat can be used, but is usually combined with another grain since it's hard to brew.  Once you choose your grain, you soak it in water for several days."  Lady Gwenllian showed Gisela the sacks of grain and the malting vat.

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"This is the first step in the malting process.  Any fresh water will do at this point, so we will use river water since it is abundant."

"Then you dump the wet grain out onto the floor to let it germinate," she said and gestured to a slight depression in the stone floor.

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"It just sits on the floor?" Gisela asked, both surprised and somewhat disgusted.

"Not entirely.  You have to turn the seeds, which involves picking them up with a wooden shovel and tossing them lightly into the air once a day for a week.  If you think of the grains as seeds, it makes more sense.  They are sprouting, which makes the seeds able to brew.  If you want a detailed explanation, you'd have to talk to a druid or a sage, but if you don't let the grains sprout, they won't brew."

"So that's why the floor is tiled with stone?" asked Gisela.

"Yes, and also to keep the dust down so the beer is cleaner," replied Lady Gwenllian.

"The real trick to malting is to kill the new seedlings before they grow too far.  Not enough or too far and you can't brew," Lady Gwenllian finished.

"How does one kill the seedlings?" Gisela asked.

"Great question.  There are two methods."  Lady Gwenllian held up a finger.  "The first is to air dry them.  Air drying is best in the summer, when there's a lot of sunlight and heat.  It usually means a smoother tasting ale, but it's slower and less precise, so sometimes you lose yield to spores that grow too far.  We mark the barrels containing the  summer’s air dried brews and charge more for them since they have a cleaner taste but are lower yielding."

She held up a second finger. "The other method is kiln drying, which you can use year round.  Our kiln doubles as a heat source for boiling."  Lady Gwenllian pointed to the kiln.

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"Kiln drying is more precise and kills the seedlings quickly, but it can be tricky.  Too hot and you scorch the grains, making them useless.  If you use a smoky fuel, the ale tastes like the fuel.  Sometimes you want that, but usually you don't.  I prefer to use straw or sea-coal, but most people use peat or simply wood.  It's more expensive since you have to pay for the fuel, and since fuel around here is in fairly short supply, we will have to minimize kiln drying until we establish a good fuel source.  The expense of the fuel is made up for in the extra yield from killing the seedlings precisely and from the higher price charged for the ale made from the air-dried malt."

"At this point, your malt is done.  Malt is easy to store for a year or more.  We will make sure we always have an ample supply on hand in the case of a siege.  Once our reserves are full, we will sell the excess.  Small breweries without enough floor space will pay for malt to avoid having to malt their own grains."

Gisela nodded.  "I shall make it a priority to cultivate trading partnerships with such establishments."  She looked at the barrels of malted grain on the floor, then to the storage of grains in the rafters above.

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A few cats roamed the overhead storage, while on the ground level, several terriers happily patrolled about.  "M'lady, may I assume that the animals are for rodent control?" Gisela asked.

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Lady Gwenllian reached down and scratched one of the terriers behind the ears.  "That's right.  The dogs are easier to train to stay in a territory, so they get the brewery floor.  The cats roam freely in and out, but they can get into the higher and tighter spaces.  Mice and rats are always a problem with the amount of grain stored here, but we should be able to keep the population under control with the dogs and cats."

Next, Lady Gwenllian led Gisela to a large contraption with a hopper and three stone rollers in the corner.  "The next step is to mill the malted grain."  She pointed to the odd equipment.

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Gisela looked confused.  "This does not appear to be any mill that I am familiar with.  Are not mills usually two large, flat stones that lay atop one another and turn to grind grains?"

"Many people grind their malted grain with traditional mills as you describe, but this type of grinding damages the husks too much, which makes the next step, the mashing process, more difficult.  Small breweries get around this by hand crushing the malt in a mortar, but it's too time consuming for larger operations.  My family invented this rolling mill for crushing the malted grains while being gentler on the husks."  Lady Gwenllian demonstrated the hand crank that spun the three stone rollers.  Gisela imagined the malted grain falling down from the hopper above and getting crushed in the rollers before falling into the barrel below.  "It's been copied by a lot of breweries over the years, so it's not a great secret anymore."

Lady Gwenllian walked past the door to the kitchen to the next corner of the brewery where a large lead vat sat atop the stone kiln.  Next to it, a long trough stood, sloped slightly downward, and below it sat a barrel.  Some steps led up to a wooden walkway around the lead vat.  Lady Gwenllian climbed these and Gisela followed her.

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"The crushed, malted grain is dumped into this vat, and water is added.  This time, the water should be fresh and as clean as possible, so we will have to cart in water from some of the nearby springs that feed the Afondraig River."

"How is water sourced in times of siege?" Gisela asked.

"In the case of a siege, we will use any stored clean water, but after that we can use either well or river water.  Although it won't produce as high a quality brew, it will sustain our troops," Lady Gwenllian replied.

Continuing, she gestured to the vat.  "The mixture of crushed malt and water is heated from the oven below.  This is called mashing and is the trickiest part of brewing.  The temperature must be exact, or the brew will fail.  Too cold and the mash is not activated.  Too hot and the life of the brew is killed.    The whole mashing process takes around an hour."

"How do you know when the right temperature has been reached?" Gislea asked.

Lady Gwenllian smiled at her.  "That is the art of brewing!" she laughed.  "The truth is that most brewers feel the temperature with their hands and only the good ones get it right all the time.  My great grandmother found a way around this, and made our family famous for producing a consistently good beer."  Lady Gwenllian climbed down to the floor again then unlocked and opened a chest, removing two candles: one white and one black. 

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"These candles are made from special waxes by a secret family process.  A cut of wax from each is placed in a small glass dish and floated on the surface of the mash.  When the white wax melts, the temperature is hot enough.  If the black wax melts, it's too hot, and you have to cool the fires quickly to avoid spoiling the brew."

Gisela was suitably impressed.

"Of course, these are actual candles, too, so their true nature is hidden well and if need be, you can burn them to prevent the secret from being revealed," Lady Gwenllian said.  She reminisced for a moment on her old life.  "When I escaped from Albers, I brought three chests from my family's castle.  They contained gold, a few family heirlooms including the recipe books for our ales, and these candles.  This is the secret of our craft that we must protect."

Gisela nodded.  "Of course, m'lady."

Lady Gwenllian replaced the candles in the chest and locked it.  She stood and dusted her hands.  "The mash after heating is called the wort.  Wort is sweet with the sugars, and has to be separated from the grains.  The vat is drained from this spigot," she pointed to a metal spigot, "through a cheesecloth into a barrel to filter out the spent grain.  The grains are poured back into the vat and warm water is used to filter it again, and then the process is repeated.  Each filtration has less sugar in it, and makes a weaker brew.  This is called parti-gyle brewing.  The first extract is the 'single beer' and is sold.  The weaker brews are called 'small beer' and are reserved for servants.  The spent grains, called draff, are fed to livestock."

"At this point the wort can be flavored.  Many brewers flavor their drinks with herbs and spices.  My family did as well, but hops can also be added as a preservative.  Hops add a bitter taste so must be used carefully so as not to be overpowering, but the beers last much longer and are easily transported for sale great distances away.  In Albers, there was another preservative plant, but I have not seen any here in Avalonia yet.  If hops or other preservatives are used, the wort must be boiled with them for at least an hour.  This uses more fuel, but the beer keeps much longer.  Most brewers boil their beer anyway, since it kills some of the bad growth, which helps keep it a bit longer even if hops aren't added.  Boiling also leaves a foam that is skimmed off, which improves the clarity.  I have noticed that a few brewers here in Avalonia forgo hops and boiling to make their brew more quickly, but it spoils just as quick and has a sour taste."

"M'lady, you have used the terms brews, beer, and ale.  What distinguishes between them?" asked Gisela.

"Brews are anything that is brewed, so it is a generic term," Lady Gwenllian began.  "The other terms are more confusing.  Back in Albers, we had a term called 'beor', which meant a drink made from honey, although I believe it is called 'mead' here.  Brewers in Albers describe ales as a type of beer that ferments at warmer temperatures with a particular kind of yeast (lagers being another type), but here in Avalonia any brews made without hops are called ales while those made with hops are called beer."

Gisela paused and looked like she wanted to say something, but didn't.

"It's confusing, I know," Lady Gwenllian replied. "I'm not sure the terms have global agreement yet, so be careful to ask when you travel to different places to make sure it's clear what you're talking about.  Ask what the brew is made from and if it has hops or not, and you should have a good idea."

"Yes, m'lady," Gisela replied.

"Once you boil the wort, you must cool it.  The faster the cooling, the better tasting the beer, since less time is allowed for the growth of unwanted spores and such.  To that end, we pour the hot wort into this long, shallow cooling trough."  Lady Gwenllian pointed to the large trough that sat above barrel. 

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"Because faster cooling leads to better beer, the best brewing is done over the winter, when the air is cold.  This building is designed so the doors and some windows in the roof can be opened to speed the cooling process.  If there is snow on the ground, it can be packed around the troughs for even faster cooling.  For these reasons, malt is usually made and stored in the summer, and the brewing takes place during the winter.  Poor quality brewers will make beer in the heat of summer and can have their brews 'foxed' if it's too warm outside.  Foxed beers have a red color from unwanted growth.  Our location on the coast helps keep the summer temperatures down, so we can start brewing earlier in the fall than some of the inland brewers."

"After cooling, there's usually some sediment that falls out.  You can see that the valve for draining the trough sits a little above the bottom.  That prevents some of the sediment from draining.  Small particulates are filtered out by a bit of cotton stuffed into the end of the valve.  It drains more slowly, but has better clarity, and the plug is changed out each brewing."

Lady Gwenllian walked Gisela over to a large wooden crane with various pulleys on it, suspending a barrel above some doors on the floor. 

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"And now we come to the purification process.  Yeast is added to the cooled and filtered wort, and the barrel is sealed with a lid.  This part of the process takes a few days to a couple of weeks, depending on the strength of the brew and the desired end taste.  Usually the purification process must take place in a cellar to hold the beer at the right temperature.  In our case, we were lucky to take advantage of a natural fissure in the rock that we dug out into a makeshift cave that serves the same purpose.  These large doors close to keep the temperature in the cave constant.  The barrels are lifted in and out of the cave by this rig," she said, pointing to the large wooden scaffold.  "With the pulleys, a single person can easily lift a full barrel up and down without difficulty."

"Is that rig built to the dwarven designs?" Gisela asked.

"Yes, Sven used the design that you negotiated from the local dwarves to build this contraption.  It is counterweighted with some stone from the top, and has gears underneath that allow the entire apparatus to turn back and forth to load the barrels.  Nice work getting the design for such a low price!" Lady Gwenllian complimented.

"Thank you, m'lady," Gislela curtsied.  Pausing a moment and looking at the barrel, she then asked "Where does the yeast come from?"

"For now, we're buying it from the baker in town, but eventually we will be able to hold back some of the yeast that settles out of our brews to begin our next batches, and in time, we will have enough to be sold to others," Lady Gwenllian replied.

"Are the beers sold in the purification casks?" Gisela asked.

Lady Gwenllian shook her head.  "No, once the brews are purified, the barrels are hoisted back out of the cave and are opened and poured into new, clean barrels of various sizes.  Excess yeast is harvested that can be used for the next batch of beer, and more sediment falls out, again improving the clarity.  Then the casks of beer can be sent back to the cave for storage during the summer months, or stored in a shed in the winter before being sold or tapped and drunk."

Lady Gwenllian led Gisela outside through two huge doors, finding Mohatu waiting for them.  

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"The large doors allow for a horse cart to be pulled into the brewery to load the barrels," Lady Gwenllian explained.

She gave Gisela a serious look.  "Our first brews will be sold, since we need a source of income.  I have spent most of my family's fortune on the beginnings of the castle, so it is important that you bring us the best prices you can for our beer, or we will have a hard time next year.  I will mark each barrel with the flavors they contain and discuss prices for you to negotiate their sales."

Gisela nodded.  "I understand, m'lady.  I will make sure that our beer is sold widely at the best price possible."

As Lady Gwenllian closed the large doors behind her, she turned back to her new ambassador.  "I'm sure you will.  I wish you well in avenging your brother.  I have assigned a small contingent of my guard to accompany you to help with your endeavor and keep you safe."

"Thank you, m'lady," Gisela replied with a curtsey.

Lady Gwenllian took her hand in a warrior's grasp.

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"Go with speed and luck!" she wished her new ambassador, and then watched Mohatu follow her down the rock outcrop to her waiting ship.

Spoiler

This thing has been a monster, having been a year and a half in the making now.  Multiple purchases from B&P, PAB, and BL later, I finally had all the parts I needed.  I was trying to do some new techniques, such as with the smooth roofline, and wound up rebuilding the interior several times, including one from a catastrophic fall where it exploded.  I also found out how many reddish brown bricks from the weak batches I had since I lost at least 50.  All in all, I’m pretty happy with how this turned out, although it is deceptively large.  The back of the roofline at the highest point is the height of the inner curtain for the castle, so this will eventually form part of a larger structure.  Everything is functional: the doors all open, the kiln opens, and the winch actually raises and lowers.  I know some people are going to kill me for mixing old LG and new LBG, but I think that it kind of works on a scale and texture this large.

The design of this brewery is based on the plans for St. Gall, a planned but unbuilt medieval abbey, that included a brewery.  The scale here was translated using the 1:42 minifigure scale shown in Brick Architect's website to give a 30x35 stud base for the brewery (which is not unreasonable given the approximations made from the original plans).  Much of the interior inspiration comes from Lacock Abbey Brewery

I had to do some research into brewing itself to faithfully replicate any medieval brewery and its contents.  In particular, the economics of medieval brewing are discussed at length through the history of Margery Kempe in a scholarly fashion.  The process described is as accurate as I could make it, with, of course some modern terms changed for old ones and a few embellishments for the story.

And finally, Prenmôr is on the map!  C&C welcome and appreciated!

Edit: Ooops, forgot the microscale update!

 

Edited by Grover

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Nice building, I like a lot the roof, details and the interiors.
I would have liked to see some liquid but I understand if it is not present.
Overall good job. :thumbup:

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Posted (edited)

Prenmôr is back, and better than ever! *oh2* Comparing this build to Prenmôr Forge, you can really see your progression as a builder!  I find those dormer windows excellent! Seamless integration, great placement and spacing, and they complement the look and feel of the black double cheese slopes so well! :wub: Also, just the right amount of birds and 'growth' to avoid monotony. Nice canopy and decorated pillars, windows with inset (nicely in grey!) and that cups and barrel decoration above the door is just fantastic! I'm impressed with the functional, well-thought-out, and presentable the interior, and I really enjoyed the guided tour! :wink: Love the malt mixture heater in the corner, great use of modern pieces! Looking forward to your next build!

Edited by Exetrius

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8 hours ago, derEselausErgste said:

I‘m in a hurry, so just in a few words: awesome building, awesomely built! 

Thank you!

3 hours ago, Niku said:

Nice building, I like a lot the roof, details and the interiors.
I would have liked to see some liquid but I understand if it is not present.
Overall good job. :thumbup:

Thanks!  I have plans for some pics of the first brew party wherein the brewery will be operational so look for that later when I get some more of those Harry Potter butter beer mugs!

1 hour ago, Exetrius said:

Prenmôr is back, and better than ever! *oh2* Comparing this build to Prenmôr Forge, you can really see your progression as a builder!  I find those dormer windows excellent! Seamless integration, great placement and spacing, and they complement the look and feel of the black double cheese slopes so well! :wub: Also, just the right amount of birds and 'growth' to avoid monotony. Nice canopy and decorated pillars, windows with inset (nicely in grey!) and that cups and barrel decoration above the door is just fantastic! I'm impressed with the functional, well-thought-out, and presentable the interior, and I really enjoyed the guided tour! :wink: Love the malt mixture heater in the corner, great use of modern pieces! Looking forward to your next build!

Thank you!  I wish I had more time to work on this, but I'm kind of a perfectionist, so I build and rebuild a lot, which doesn't help with my lack of time.  I can't tell you how many times I rebuilt the dormers!  I agree with you on the grey window frames.  I don't like the brown in grey when it's supposed to be all stone.  I did have to order those from B&P though, which took some time.  Glad you liked the stone barrel and cups!  I had fun building that and was worried it was too recessed to be noticed, but was pleasantly surprised with how the pictures turned out.  I'm really happy you liked the guided tour... I was hoping it wasn't too long!  Thanks for all the comments!

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This build kinda has it all, doesn't it? Great micro to set the scene, great exterior facade, great interior, great details (love the brewery details) great lighting and camera work, and a great in-depth story to go along with it.

Awesome work.

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1 hour ago, mccoyed said:

This build kinda has it all, doesn't it? Great micro to set the scene, great exterior facade, great interior, great details (love the brewery details) great lighting and camera work, and a great in-depth story to go along with it.

Awesome work.

Thanks!  I am glad you enjoyed it!  It only took a year and a half, so hopefully my next builds will be a little faster... :angel_sing:

And, I had some time for more shots tonight, so... bonus pics!

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Enjoying a job well done!  Lady Gwenllian's faithful steed Cedors steals some brew.

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Top down look at the interior.

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This is an older WIP shot with poor lighting, but it shows the upper storage area better with the roof removed.  Construction worker for scale.

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The build broken into its 5 pieces.

 

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Awesome interior!  Really like how you crafted all the equipment and squeezed it all into the build.

If I had one criticism, it's that the interior walls are very bare in some of the pictures.  Some racks with tools, couple more lamps, pictures or shields or something to bring some life to the interior might have helped.

Great build! :thumbup:

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Posted (edited)

This is a terrific build and narrative.  The roof looks awesome.  The interior details are very nice and I appreciate them more with your explanation (via story - well done).  Regarding the gray vs. bley, it looks fine with with the lighting you used - usually I don't like them mixed, but didn't notice until you mentioned it.

P.S. the decorative pillars on the outside and stone building make this quite the impressive brewery and it sounds like it is staffed when an excellent brewer.  The landscaping on the outside with the ruts looks great too!

Edited by jtooker
I had more to say

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On 6/13/2021 at 3:53 PM, mrcp6d said:

Awesome interior!  Really like how you crafted all the equipment and squeezed it all into the build.

If I had one criticism, it's that the interior walls are very bare in some of the pictures.  Some racks with tools, couple more lamps, pictures or shields or something to bring some life to the interior might have helped.

Great build! :thumbup:

Thanks!  It was a tough squeeze to put it all in!

I only see one wall near the kiln that is somewhat bare.  I could probably put a shield there, but I tried to be practical: tools or a lantern would not be reachable there, so it would be a largely bare wall.  I thought about tapestries, but settled for the flags, so they didn't cover as much wall.

On 6/13/2021 at 5:54 PM, jtooker said:

This is a terrific build and narrative.  The roof looks awesome.  The interior details are very nice and I appreciate them more with your explanation (via story - well done).  Regarding the gray vs. bley, it looks fine with with the lighting you used - usually I don't like them mixed, but didn't notice until you mentioned it.

P.S. the decorative pillars on the outside and stone building make this quite the impressive brewery and it sounds like it is staffed when an excellent brewer.  The landscaping on the outside with the ruts looks great too!

Thank you!  I was happy with how the roof came out.  I'm glad you liked the story explanation, I wasn't sure how that would turn out.  I think the LBG vs. LG can be problematic, but if there's enough texture and a large enough surface it can turn out alright, so I'm happy to hear it wasn't too noticable!

I figured since this is the main income of the castle that I should make it more ornamental than the utilitarian forge and had some fun with the columns and the stone decoration above the door.  It's good to hear that you like the landscaping too.  It will be interesting to see how it fits together with the rest of the builds in the inner ward once I get it all done.

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You can really tell how much work you put into this build, it turned out really polished.  I think the black roof helps that look, it's so smooth.  (Also, the way it reflects the light a bit looks super cool!)

The kiln is my favorite part, I love how smoothly built into the wall it is--not something that's easy to build with a round shape like that!  But all the details of the process are so well represented.  The barrel lift is also a favorite of mine!

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On 6/16/2021 at 1:07 PM, Kai NRG said:

You can really tell how much work you put into this build, it turned out really polished.  I think the black roof helps that look, it's so smooth.  (Also, the way it reflects the light a bit looks super cool!)

The kiln is my favorite part, I love how smoothly built into the wall it is--not something that's easy to build with a round shape like that!  But all the details of the process are so well represented.  The barrel lift is also a favorite of mine!

Thanks!  I am glad it came out polished.  It got torn down a few times first!  The kiln was a challenge.  I had to experiment a bit, but finally used a method for Innovalug to do the curved part.  It's not perfect, but I think it works pretty well.  Getting all the parts to fit together was interesting too!

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Posted (edited)

As expected, this is impressive and I don't know where to start.

The roof is absolutely perfect, although I'm afraid the birds will soon have spoiled those nice black tiles. Did the gulls on the roof ridge bring a starfish up there?? (EDIT : oh yes, they did...it's obvious on the additional photos down the thread!)
The sculpture above the door is beautiful, decorative and yet quite sober. Very appropriate for a utility building in a castle.
I love the crane - well designed, efficient, perfect! And most generally all the interior elements, which really look functional and close to your source inspiration.
Also, it's really cute how the dogs follow the ladies everywhere during their visit.

Last but definitely not least, I'm really impressed by the amount of research you did for the build. I learned so much just by reading the text!

Edited by Aurore

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This is a very well built MOC, from the outside, aswell from the inside, I love the details of the interior. I also love how you can just tear this build down in just 5 parts, so it must be pretty stable too!

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very finely done, and the miniature at the beginning is a nice touch as well 

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Superb build! Even the thought of building independent pieces for easy dismantling is genius!

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On 7/8/2021 at 6:23 AM, Aurore said:

As expected, this is impressive and I don't know where to start.

The roof is absolutely perfect, although I'm afraid the birds will soon have spoiled those nice black tiles. Did the gulls on the roof ridge bring a starfish up there?? (EDIT : oh yes, they did...it's obvious on the additional photos down the thread!)
The sculpture above the door is beautiful, decorative and yet quite sober. Very appropriate for a utility building in a castle.
I love the crane - well designed, efficient, perfect! And most generally all the interior elements, which really look functional and close to your source inspiration.
Also, it's really cute how the dogs follow the ladies everywhere during their visit.

Last but definitely not least, I'm really impressed by the amount of research you did for the build. I learned so much just by reading the text!

Thank you!  The roof took some doing, but I'm pleased with how it turned out.  And yes, the gulls are eating the starfish!  I had some fun with the stone carving above the door.  I'm glad that you could recognize the source material from the build.  I try to make things realistic if I can.  I'm glad you enjoyed reading the text.  I try to provide some historical snapshots, even if this is a fantasy world!

And yes, I had fun with the dogs following the ladies around.  I thought it only natural!

On 7/20/2021 at 6:43 AM, Servertijd said:

This is a very well built MOC, from the outside, aswell from the inside, I love the details of the interior. I also love how you can just tear this build down in just 5 parts, so it must be pretty stable too!

Thanks!  It took a lot of work to pack all the detail in, but in the end it worked out.  Aside from some of the decorative bits (like the grasses and birds), the building itself is quite solid and does not fall apart.

On 7/20/2021 at 10:55 AM, Spader said:

very finely done, and the miniature at the beginning is a nice touch as well 

Thank you!  I try to keep updating the micro build to show the progress of the castle as it comes together!

On 7/21/2021 at 5:50 AM, blackdeathgr said:

Superb build! Even the thought of building independent pieces for easy dismantling is genius!

Thanks!  I try to make sure my story builds have interiors and thus they all need a way to see inside, so I plan a lot trying to get it into separable pieces!  Glad you liked it!

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