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This latest model of mine has two rather unique functions, and a number of more commonplace ones. The unique ones are a remote-controlled torque-vectoring central differential, and an automatically functioning twin-clutch rear axle. Read on for more details!

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Features:

Opening doors, hood, and tailgate

AWD with two PF L-motors and an I-4 piston engine

Steering with PF M-motor, connected to steering wheel and PF switch for controlling twin-clutch rear axle

Disc brakes with two PF M-motors

8-speed sequential gearbox with PF Servo motor

Servo motor for twin-clutch rear axle

M-motor for overriding twin-clutch rear axle

M-motor for torque-vectoring central differential

Front MacPherson strut suspension

Rear multilink suspension

 

More details:

Aesthetics:

The aesthetic was honestly rather half-hearted at the back, but the front was attractive enough for my low standards. As usual, though, the effort went into the functions.

Spoiler

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Opening stuff:

Spoiler

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Interior:

The interior was fairly detailed, with tilting front seats and a 60/40 folding rear bench.

Spoiler

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Drive:

A goal in this model was to model a realistic transverse drivetrain as far as it was possible, before the AWD components come into play. As such, the two PF L-motors, I-4 piston engine, and transmission were all oriented transversely. The model drove reasonably well in the lower four gears, but would not drive in the upper four.

Spoiler

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Steering:

There was a PF M-motor for steering, which drove the front rack through a 1:8 worm ratio, and then a 8:24 ratio. After this, it drove some 16T gears, one of which drove the steering wheel through a chain, and another of which drove a pair of bevel gears, which flipped a PF switch through its full travel as the wheels steered. More on this switch's function later.

Spoiler

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Steering motor

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Steering drivetrain and rack

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Steering drivetrain and PF switch

 

Brakes:

The disc brakes used a new design of mine in hopes of attaining greater breaking power, but this was not really to be, since the brakes were still weak. For the first time, I used two separate motors (PF M) for the front and rear, in order to avoid a challenging to package and backlash inducing mechanical linkage.

Spoiler

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This PF M-motor drove the 16T gears, which then drove bevel gears, which moved 2L beams, which pulled links, to activate the brakes.

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The M-motor drives the U-joints, which moves a basic linkage, which runs the bevel gears for the rear brake.

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The bevel gears drive these 2L beams to pull these 6L links

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Which run this braking system.

 

Gearbox:

The gearbox used a tried-and-true 8-speed sequential gearbox of my own design, which packs a lot of gears into a strong, compact structure. Here it is shifted by a PF Servo motor.

Spoiler

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The gearbox was not very visible here, but better images can be seen in either my Audi RS6 or my Ram Rebel TRX models, both of which used this design.

 

Twin Clutch Rear axle

This feature replicates a real feature present on Badlands versions of the Bronco Sport. It replaces the rear differential with a pair of two clutches, which allow the torque to be electronically varied between the two rear wheels. In my simplified version, a servo motor moved a rotary catch set up such that in the center, both axles' driving rings would be activated, but rotating it to either side would disconnect a wheel. This servo was driven by the aforementioned switch connected to the steering motor, so that it would automatically disconnect the inside wheel when the model steered.

Spoiler

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This Servo motor drives the 12T bevel gear, which drives the 20T double-bevel gear

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That 20T double-bevel gear drives a 12T double-bevel gear hidden under the universal joints in this image, which drives the rotary catch.

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Rear axle lock

As in the real car, I had a lock mode for the rear axle. In this mode, neither rear wheel gets disconnected when steering, causing the model to function as if it had a locked rear differential. This was done rather simply with a second switch controlling the servo motor for the wheel disconnect. When the switch was on, the axle worked as usual, but when it was off, the axle remained locked. This switch was controlled remotely with a PF M-motor

Spoiler

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Suspension:

The suspension was fairly complicated, with a front MacPherson strut setup, and a rear multilink setup. The rear suspension was directly copied from a third-gen Ford Escape's rear axle, so it ended up having four links (as well as a link for brakes), which were a longitudinal link, a lower wishbone, and two transverse links. The front suspension used one hard 6.5L shock per side, and the rear used a hard 6.5L shock per side, as well as some rubber band assistance (I know it's a cheap solution).

Spoiler

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Overall, the model provided me with interesting mechanical challenges, which is my main motivation for building. As always with my large, complex models, it was hardly an enjoyable car to drive around (I think I drove it twice: Once for testing, and once on video), didn't work flawlessly (The steering could be hesitant to steer, and the upper four gears didn't work), and didn't look perfect, but it succeeded at my goals of packing a lot of realistic, interesting functions into a reasonably small package.

 

More images at: https://bricksafe.com/pages/2GodBDGlory/ford-bronco-sport

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I'm still struggling to wrap my head around the insane amount of functions you've managed to cram into the car. I wouldn't even know where to start with something like this :laugh:

Don't worry about the (very few) technical shortcomings you mentioned. Your builds always have that "kid-going-all-out-with-his-Lego-because-he-can" feel to them which, to me, is one of the most beautiful things about this hobby. Please keep 'em coming :wub:

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Hey! My applause for the BRONCO sign imitiated from 1*1 tiles!

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5 hours ago, Aleh said:

Hey! My applause for the BRONCO sign imitiated from 1*1 tiles!

Thanks! I was planning on just using 1x1 square ones, but then I decided I might as well use circles for some, and then I realized that my lone quarter circle one would fit at well!

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Your build reminds me of this, in terms of sheer complexity, but you've really taken it to the next level :wub:

 

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How many motors do you want in your MOC?

2GodBDGlory: YES!

 

The underside of your MOCs always looks like a mess, but the ammount of functions is crazy!

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2 hours ago, suffocation said:

Your build reminds me of this, in terms of sheer complexity, but you've really taken it to the next level :wub:

That is a pretty sweet model, especially for its time period, and I think you're right that that is the kind of thing I might build if I had a 1990s-vintage collection!

(This one wasn't actually designed for the absolute maximum complexity, though, that would go to my older 1:7 Bugatti Chiron.)

1 hour ago, Gray Gear said:

How many motors do you want in your MOC?

2GodBDGlory: YES!

 

The underside of your MOCs always looks like a mess, but the ammount of functions is crazy!

Thanks! I always make sure to leave at least three studs of space under my floor, because I know I'll need to fit motors and all sorts of other stuff underneath.

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Nice build, crazy amount of details and functions. I think the front hood looks disproportionately large compared to the rest of the car. Also, on the front suspension, you mentioned that the spring just twists when the car is being steered, won't that mess up the spring eventually?

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9 hours ago, MY1 said:

Nice build, crazy amount of details and functions. I think the front hood looks disproportionately large compared to the rest of the car. Also, on the front suspension, you mentioned that the spring just twists when the car is being steered, won't that mess up the spring eventually?

The spring is attached to the hub rigidly, and pivots on the top.

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, 2GodBDGlory said:

I always make sure to leave at least three studs of space under my floor, because I know I'll need to fit motors and all sorts of other stuff underneath.

Yeah I noticed :laugh: your building style is quite unique. It allows for a lot of space to work with, but I dislike the decease in the car's interior space. 

I try to keep as much of a car's interior space on my MOCs, but that means I have a lot less space for mechanisms available. Basically only under the dash, in the center tunnel, under the rear seats and trunk area.

But I guess I kind of enjoy the space limitations, because it challenges me to improve my mechanism designs. And I only keep the functions that actually work pretty reliably :grin:

 

Btw do you have a part number for that Planetary piece? I have never seen that piece before, probably because it is older than me lol

Edited by Gray Gear

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4 hours ago, Gray Gear said:

Yeah I noticed :laugh: your building style is quite unique. It allows for a lot of space to work with, but I dislike the decease in the car's interior space. 

I try to keep as much of a car's interior space on my MOCs, but that means I have a lot less space for mechanisms available. Basically only under the dash, in the center tunnel, under the rear seats and trunk area.

But I guess I kind of enjoy the space limitations, because it challenges me to improve my mechanism designs. And I only keep the functions that actually work pretty reliably :grin:

 

Btw do you have a part number for that Planetary piece? I have never seen that piece before, probably because it is older than me lol

I suppose it is all about priorities...

That planetary part's Bricklink number is x186, and is very obscure, only appearing in a single Technic parts pack in 1978. When a Bricklink seller whom I was buying pneumatics from just so happened to have this rare part for $10, I couldn't resist picking it up, but this is the first time it has come in handy. It is hard to attach to studless models, and, unfortunately, has a rather easily activated internal clutch, but it can provide huge reduction in a way that no modern piece can.

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24 minutes ago, 2GodBDGlory said:

*snip* but it can provide huge reduction in a way that no modern piece can.

Well you can use the planetary gear hubs in a similar way. They might not be as effective, but they are easier to fix in place, and they are new. I'd say a good alternative :wink:

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22 hours ago, Gray Gear said:

Well you can use the planetary gear hubs in a similar way. They might not be as effective, but they are easier to fix in place, and they are new. I'd say a good alternative :wink:

Similar, but it has a much smaller gear ratio than the 1:20 the old part offers. It is a very useful part, though, and at least a partial replacement.

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