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Posted (edited)

Normally, RC cars can't roll free, when an electric motor is off, due to reduction inside the motor.

As a result - no free rolling, no inertia. Sudden starting and stopping. Robotic movement.

In my RC car a clutch is automatically enabling/disabling, once the motor is on/off respectively. 

It's similar to a real life driving, where you can alternate acceleration and free rolling in a neutral gear.

1 PF L-motor for propulsion

1 PF Servo-motor for steering

https://youtu.be/HMyCtJ3kZMM

https://www.instagram.com/parazels83

Edited by Parazels

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Looks good, can you show the mechanism used for that?

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1 minute ago, Jundis said:

Looks good, can you show the mechanism used for that?

Yes, later on instagram.

Can you explain me, how to make a visible YouTube link?

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5 hours ago, Parazels said:

Yes, later on instagram.

Can you explain me, how to make a visible YouTube link?

It should be automatically embedded

 

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5 minutes ago, JintaiZ said:

It should be automatically embedded

 

Thank you, but it didn't work. I added your link...

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Just now, Parazels said:

Thank you, but it didn't work. I added your link...

Did you use copy and paste?

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Just now, JintaiZ said:

Did you use copy and paste?

Yes

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1 minute ago, Parazels said:

Yes

Then I don't know why it isn't working, but since the video is added here everyone else can see it now.

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3 hours ago, Parazels said:

Thank you, but it didn't work. I added your link...

Try again: take the link, remove the "s" from "https", and copy & paste it here. It should work (don't forget to press enter).

I love this! The fact that the differential disconnects is for playability, right? If yes, great idea!

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Your link is the shortened version, you need the full one (the one you see in your browser bar, not the one you get from sharing it on mobile) Here's what you should paste for it to be automatically embedded:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMyCtJ3kZMM

Interesting idea with the freecoasting!

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, chlego said:

I love this! The fact that the differential disconnects is for playability, right? If yes, great idea!

It's realistic. But it works better, if you have enough space to accelerate your car. Then it can roll by inertia.

My car is a concept. With a buggy motor and more precise steering the results would be more impressive.

Edited by Parazels

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13 minutes ago, Parazels said:

This is how it works

Ah, thanks :-)

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Amazing solution! I expected to see a similar thing but still wondered how it works for reverse too, as a single "cutch" works only is a single direction.

So, your idea is quite smart and compact. All genius things are too simple to be easily-invented :thumbup:

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On 3/3/2021 at 12:37 PM, Parazels said:

It's realistic. But it works better, if you have enough space to accelerate your car. Then it can roll by inertia.

My car is a concept. With a buggy motor and more precise steering the results would be more impressive.

It is quite an interesting idea! I would say, though, that in a truly fast, buggy motor-powered vehicle, one might prefer an "engine brake" to the coasting ability, but the mechanism is still innovative and worth seeing!

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