ColletArrow

7760-inspired PF Shunter

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I've always enjoyed the off-centre-cab shape of the classic 7760, so no sooner had I bodged my own PF-9V battery connector then I started to build one. There ended up being very little in common with the original set other than the overall body/cab shape, but anyway.

The colour scheme was dictated by A: my existing parts collection, because I'm a student and don't like buying things, and B: an attempt at what this loco would look like if the British Rail Civil Engineers had used one. I quite like using this grey-yellow-black livery on locomotives, because the black around the windows and doors make them stand out against the bodywork.

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The handrails either side of the cab don't really make sense, but the only LBG 1x1s I had available are either horizontal clips or headlight bricks, so I put them there anyway. The cab is actually fairly open inside, but there isn't really an interior unless you count lots of wires...

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The front bonnet ended up held in place by gravity and friction rather than stud connections; this makes it very easy to open in order to detach the battery from the connector, which is the only way to turn the model off!

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With the cab removed as well, we can see there really is just a big bundle of cables in there. The receiver is only half poking out into the rear bonnet, but signal reception is still fine.

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In building this model I stole plenty of parts from my 20T Brake Van (and yet still didn't have enough LBG 1x1 & 1x2 bricks, hence why the cab sides are so messy). This meant it needed rebuilding, and I'm actually happier with it now - it's lost the handrails, but the yellow banding is a lot more consistent around the ends.

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Finally, the loco with its short works train of a bogie flat, a general purpose crane and the brake van. 

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And, as ever, the Bricksafe folder containing the photos and LDD file can be found here: https://bricksafe.com/pages/Collet22/7760-inspired-shunter.
Thank you for reading; what do you think?

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That's a nice detailed shunter in a small package! I like the color scheme and the clever power system. :thumbup:

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Wow! Incredible that you managed to fit everything in such a tiny model and still make it look good. 

Do you have any videos of the shunter running? Very interested to see how the rods look when it's running. :sweet:

 

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19 hours ago, Pdaitabird said:

That's a nice detailed shunter in a small package! I like the color scheme and the clever power system. :thumbup:

Thanks, I'm glad you like it. 

7 hours ago, LEGOTrainBuilderSG said:

Wow! Incredible that you managed to fit everything in such a tiny model and still make it look good. 

Do you have any videos of the shunter running? Very interested to see how the rods look when it's running. :sweet:

 

I'm quite happy with the bonnet, especially the grilles on the side - I initially tried using panels, but they looked far too plain, so I went brick built instead and I'm glad I did. As for a video, I'll make one and add it to the backlog I have to upload when I get access to reliable internet again! 

6 hours ago, A Wild P42 said:

Love it! How did you hook up that non-lego to the motor?

Thanks! Like this:

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The receiver's plug was already damaged, so I had no concern opening it to splice in the extra wires from the 9V battery clip. Due to the internals of the connector I didn't even need to solder anything, so it's completely reversible. Now I just need to find some rechargable 9V batteries for it! 

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12 minutes ago, M_slug357 said:

You should add a on/off switch!

I used a SPST, but you could make it fancier, if you fancy it.

I contemplated it, but since I need to be able to take the batteries out easily to recharge them (when I get rechargeables), I might as well use that to cut the power. Maybe I need to rummage through dad's extensive electronics-bits collection again...

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Technology indeed! It turns out I now have the technology to upload videos in minutes not hours, so here's what she looks like running around my temporary layout.

Side-notes on the layout - I've built a few items of lineside detailing, inspired by @Hod Carrier's work in his thread. However, as you can see in the video, I'm experimenting with making the signals work. I've brick-built all the signals I think need - a 2-aspect standard and a ground signal protecting the siding, one set of wig-wags for the open level crossing and a pair of Driver's White Lights either side.

Currently only the 2-aspect and the level crossing wig-wags have LEDs wired up for them, using 5mms and 3mms respectively. I also haven't built any proper controls yet - I'm using a children's "digital logic" experiment kit thing to power and manually switch one signal at a time, as well as provide the flashing circuit for the wig-wags. Hopefully, there's more to come soon!

Edited by ColletArrow
Added lineside detailing credit

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8 hours ago, ColletArrow said:

Technology indeed! It turns out I now have the technology to upload videos in minutes not hours, so here's what she looks like running around my temporary layout.

Side-notes on the layout - I've built a few items of lineside detailing, inspired by @Hod Carrier's work in his thread. However, as you can see in the video, I'm experimenting with making the signals work. I've brick-built all the signals I think need - a 2-aspect standard and a ground signal protecting the siding, one set of wig-wags for the open level crossing and a pair of Driver's White Lights either side.

Currently only the 2-aspect and the level crossing wig-wags have LEDs wired up for them, using 5mms and 3mms respectively. I also haven't built any proper controls yet - I'm using a children's "digital logic" experiment kit thing to power and manually switch one signal at a time, as well as provide the flashing circuit for the wig-wags. Hopefully, there's more to come soon!

WOW! The little engine that could runs really well. :wink: Looks like i will try using the those connectors for my shunter. 

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For the battery connection I just bought a couple of cheap PF extension cables from Ali Express and cut them in half. Connect to a switch and the battery clip on the other side.

On my Koef the battery is at the front, so it can stay in there for charging.

I was wondering whether you were off picture, furiously rocking a switch back and forth! :pir_tong2: I like all the lighting work you have done. :thumbup:

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On 7/9/2020 at 4:37 AM, LEGOTrainBuilderSG said:

WOW! The little engine that could runs really well. :wink: Looks like i will try using the those connectors for my shunter. 

Thanks, I look forward to seeing what you come up with!

20 hours ago, zephyr1934 said:

Great work!

Thank you!

29 minutes ago, Thai bricks said:

For the battery connection I just bought a couple of cheap PF extension cables from Ali Express and cut them in half. Connect to a switch and the battery clip on the other side.

On my Koef the battery is at the front, so it can stay in there for charging.

I was wondering whether you were off picture, furiously rocking a switch back and forth! :pir_tong2: I like all the lighting work you have done. :thumbup:

But this way, I didn't need to buy anything :tongue:! I made sure that I can still use the receiver with the normal PF battery boxes etc, although the connector doesn't have 'control' pins anymore since the battery clip wires occupy the space the 'control' wires used to exit the connector housing. As for battery placement, when I do get rechargeables they'll likely be the type that needs to be placed in a cradle to charge, so being easy-access is a distinct advantage even if it was largely accidental in this model.

And the lights - I was manually switching between off, amber and reds (I think you can here the switches click in the background), but as I said the flashing was done electronically. Part of me wants to set up a proper system with sensors and timers, but the 'layout' is so rarely set up I don't think it's worth it.

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My battery gets charged via USB cable from a phone charger. I was only trying to make a bit of fun out of you. :-)

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2 hours ago, Thai bricks said:

My battery gets charged via USB cable from a phone charger. I was only trying to make a bit of fun out of you. :-)

I've seen those come up in my searches, but I'm slightly concerned they would have poorer max. voltage or running time. Are you happy with them? I've just spotted a pair on Amazon at a heavily discounted price, I might have to try them!

And I figured, just wanted to take the opportunity to add more detail :tongue:

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I don't have a layout yet, so I can't tell. But the circuitry must make the actual battery cells smaller, no doubt. Then again, it's a shunter.

Edit: there are two versions of these so-called 9V Li-Ion batteries: the simpler version gives the straight LiIon voltage of 7.4V. Then there is one with a voltage step-up circuit that converts it to 9V. This will give more power/speed, but there are 2 downsides: the circuit takes up more space and there are losses in the conversion process, meaning less capacity (runtime). It is always on, meaning they will slowly self-discharge, until the protection circuitry turns it off to avoid damage. I have the simple version and for a shunter there is plenty of power and speed. Pulling power is limited by wheel traction only.

Edited by Thai bricks

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Super cool! Very hard to pack PF into a body as small as this, but you have done the job well, and also I love your innovative power system! I made a loco based on the 7735 loco, and then put a boxcar behind it and put the battery box and IR receiver in the boxcar. Then I put weights in the engine to weigh down the motor. The 12v grey era was the best era of trains!

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This is a really nice build. Could you tell me what wheels and cranks you used? 

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Hi ColletArrow,

I just wondered if you had any trouble with power form the 9V battery that you wired into the train?

I recently made a London Tube train and due to lack of space inside, I used a 9V battery like yours to power a PF Train Motor 

(see video below if you're interested)

But I got very flaky results... it would drive for a bit but then slow down/stop.

Did you have any power issues?
Were you using a Train Motor or a regular PF motor which then drove train wheels on axels?

Any help would be greatfully received,
Cheers
Jez.

 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Minifig Jez said:

Hi ColletArrow,

I just wondered if you had any trouble with power form the 9V battery that you wired into the train?

I recently made a London Tube train and due to lack of space inside, I used a 9V battery like yours to power a PF Train Motor 

(see video below if you're interested)

But I got very flaky results... it would drive for a bit but then slow down/stop.

Did you have any power issues?
Were you using a Train Motor or a regular PF motor which then drove train wheels on axels?

Any help would be greatfully received,
Cheers
Jez.

 

shouplnt be an issue. i ran a tram with a 9v block and a pf train motor once before switching to 9v metal track and it worked fine for a longer period of time

Edited by XG BC

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10 hours ago, Minifig Jez said:

But I got very flaky results... it would drive for a bit but then slow down/stop.

Did you have any power issues?
Were you using a Train Motor or a regular PF motor which then drove train wheels on axels?

Hmm, weird.

This shunter used a regular train motor, V1 receiver and a standard supermarket 9V battery, and had no notable issues as far as I can remember (. I've gone on to use this same power system for a couple of steam locos, although with older rechargeable batteries. In those locos, which I've probably run for longer overall, I noticed generally poorer performance. I put this down to 1. rechargeable batteries have a lower max voltage, and my ones are quite old so they're probably worse, and 2. the steam drivers have a much higher rolling resistance than the standard train axle assemblies.

I will defer to the greater experience of others when it comes to battery types, and determining whether those you used are particularly good or particularly bad.

However I might suggest swapping your technic-axle wheels for the standard axle assemblies (the slighlty older type with metal axles) - they have significantly lower rolling resistance which can make a surprising difference even on short trains, especially with weaker power sources.

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10 hours ago, ColletArrow said:

Hmm, weird.

This shunter used a regular train motor, V1 receiver and a standard supermarket 9V battery, and had no notable issues as far as I can remember (. I've gone on to use this same power system for a couple of steam locos, although with older rechargeable batteries. In those locos, which I've probably run for longer overall, I noticed generally poorer performance. I put this down to 1. rechargeable batteries have a lower max voltage, and my ones are quite old so they're probably worse, and 2. the steam drivers have a much higher rolling resistance than the standard train axle assemblies.

I will defer to the greater experience of others when it comes to battery types, and determining whether those you used are particularly good or particularly bad.

However I might suggest swapping your technic-axle wheels for the standard axle assemblies (the slighlty older type with metal axles) - they have significantly lower rolling resistance which can make a surprising difference even on short trains, especially with weaker power sources.

Many thanks for the quick reply!

The wheels will eventually never get seen, as the station I've built hides them all with platforms, so I'll try swapping them out and see if that helps (I went for technic axels as it was just cheaper than buying wheel sets!)

I'll also check the version number on my receiver, just in case that is a factor.

I'm no electrical expert, but I did some mooching last night and it also seems the AMPS you get from a 9V is less than 6 x 1.5's - AND the different types of 9V (Alkaline or ZInc-Carbon etc) also give out different AMPS, so yours may well just be better batteries than mine. - I'll buy a nice Duracell instead of Tesco own brand!

Thanks again, and as you know about the wheels I used, I guess you watched the video, so thanks for that too!

Best wishes
Jez

 

 

 

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