2GodBDGlory

1:7 Bugatti Chiron Grand Sport 300 Aero

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Posted (edited)

 

This model is the latest of a long series of "Ultimate" supercars of mine, with ever-increasing complexity. This was my first one to go all the way up to 1:7 scale to fit more complexity, and I think I can honestly claim this as the most functionally complex Technic Supercar ever! Of course, this is not the overall best Technic model, most likely, because of concerns about aesthetics and reliability. You should also note that there is no real Bugatti Chiron "Grand Sport 300 Aero," for I decided to build a made-up special edition. The Grand Sport part denotes the fact that this, unlike any factory Chirons, is a convertible, the 300 denotes the fact that this model has the extended rear end and rear aesthetic of the Super Sport 300+ version, and the Aero part denotes the aero flaps I included.

So, let's get on to this!

Aesthetics:

I think the aesthetic can be summed up as complete and detailed, but poorly proportioned. There are no large gaps in the bodywork, and many details are included, but some of the shapes and curves are off, and it is undeniably blocky.

There are LED headlights and taillights, and the classic Bugatti two-tone color scheme.

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Interior:

The interior was meant to be very detailed looking, and has many working functions, which will be covered later. One I will cover now is the adjustable steering wheel, which can be tilted and slid forward and backward.

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Opening Stuff:

The hood opens using a large pneumatic cylinder to reveal a smooth storage area.

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The doors are spring-loaded in their opening and closing, and have spring-loaded latches connected to the handles. Unfortunately, the latches were built to work the way the car was sitting when I built it, so when it was sitting on the ground, they would not latch unless I pushed up on the front end of the car.

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There is an opening gas cap controlled by a small lever under the steering wheel. I thought this was a fun function, and I got to put some old flex system parts to good use.

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The glove box opens, and has a simple latch.

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Finally, there is a simple access panel at the rear for the pneumatic controls, that doesn't correspond to anything on the real car.

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I know this doesn't really open, but it seems like a good time to mention the switch for the battery, hidden behind the passenger door.

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Pneumatic Functions:

The car has an extensive pneumatic system, with many, many components. An L-motor is hidden under the floor, and runs a single compressor at high speeds. It is controlled by a switch under the floor (I would have put it in a more convenient spot, but I was out of extension wires, and I had no choice really) Additionally, there is a manual pump under the access panel to build pressure more quickly. There is a pneumatic air tank and a manometer. There are six pneumatic switches under the access panel, controlling different functions. Two of them individually control medium size cylinders which slide the seats fore and aft, and two more control small cylinders tucked under the seats to tilt them. A fifth one operates a long, skinny cylinder that controls the rear differential lock, and the final one, as mentioned before, opens the hood with a large cylinder. Another pneumatic function is controlled by a switch in the front of the car, connected to a small axle protruding from the front. When a collision or an impact presses this axle, it opens another valve, dumping the whole air tank into a plastic bag folded into a compartment ahead of the passenger seat, to emulate an airbag deploying. (I didn't think I could fit an airbag into the steering wheel without making it hideous).

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Suspension:

There is four-wheel independent suspension, with two hard shocks per wheel. There is negative camber on all wheels, as well. Unfortunately, the suspension was utterly overwhelmed by the 17.7 pounds of Lego on top of it, so it was perpetually bottomed-out.

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Park/Reverse/Neutral/Drive Selector:

There is a manually controlled drive selector on the central console, which operates a sliding-gear gearbox to choose between park, reverse, neutral, and drive. (Park just locks the drivetrain)

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Drive:

Two XL motors in the rear of the car drive all four wheels through the gearbox (which will be covered more fully later), the drive mode selector, and three differentials. An interesting function is the torque-vectoring on the central differential--essentially, this just gears up the front half-shaft from this differential by a factor of 5/3, which results in more torque going to the rear wheels. There is also a fairly realistic W16 piston engine hooked up to these XL motors. Unlike all other Lego designs I have seen, mine not only had a single crankshaft for all 16 cylinders, but it also managed to use the regular engine block parts! Its main downside is that the shape of the engine looks like a V8 atop an H8, rather than a V8 atop a V8 (Basically, I mean that the bottom eight cylinders are flat, rather than tilted up as they should be). A Servo motor under the floor, attached to the same channel as the drive motors, controlled the gas pedal and the speedometer dial on the dashboard. On the topic of "Drive," I should probably mention that driving is not this car's forte. True, in first gear, I did manage to get the wheels to spin at infinitesimal speeds,, but I am not sure if it even moved, or whether, thanks to the bottomed-out suspension, the wheels were just spinning. Also, the drive from the motors to the gearbox was very poorly designed. I did lots of work making the drivetrain as bulletproof as possible, and then I had to move the XLs from their original position, and made a stupid design choice. I know this model is far too complex to function well, but I decided that I would rather have the challenge of building a super-complex car than the satisfaction of driving a car around.

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https://bricksafe.com/pages/2GodBDGlory/17-bugatti-chiron-grand-sport-300-aero/17-bugatti-chiron-grand-sport-300-aero-part-2/17-bugatti-chiron-grand-sport-300-aero-part-3

Steering:

The steering system may well be the most complicated thing in the entire car other than the gearbox. First of all, it has four-wheel steering, with one servo motor for each axle. Both axles have Ackermann geometry (to an extent), castor, kingpin inclination, and toe-in, and are regular rack-and-pinion setups. The front motor is hooked up to aero flaps in the hood to aerodynamically slow down the inside corner of the car, and the LEDs in the headlights are also attached to the steering motor in order to send their light into the corner rather than straight ahead. The rear axle also has aero flaps, which are built into the rear spoiler. Additionally, the rear servo is controlled through a switch that is attached to the gearbox. This has the effect of causing the car to have regular four-wheel steering in low gears, front-wheel steering in medium gears, and crab steering in high gears.

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Okay, I will confess. In those last two images, I was actually holding the flaps down with my fingers, since the mechanism was broken at the time. When I got it working later, I don't think it worked quite as well as that.

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Convertible Roof:

An Xl motor is employed in deploying the convertible roof. The mechanism in itself is rather simple, but is very reliable. The motor merely spins some tiny rubber tires (on tiny wheels, of course), which push the system-built roof forward out of its slot, covering the interior.

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Spoiler:

An M-motor in the rear works two large Linear actuators to deploy the spoiler.

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Brakes:

An L-motor under the floor runs two linear actuators through a worm gear drive, which work linkages to deploy the four-wheel disc brakes, but also to work the brake aero flaps (Unfortunately, this has a barely noticable movement). The brake pedal also is depressed by this action.

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Again, I think I might have had a finger on the corner of the spoiler here, making it look like it worked better than it did.

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Gearbox:

An M-motor in the rear shifts the eight-speed dual clutch sequential gearbox. The gearbox itself is built very strongly and fairly compactly (for a dual-clutch design). I had planned to build a 7+R, but I couldn't get the reverse gear to be strong enough, so I resorted to using an external PRND selector. There was a rear speed indicator, but it ended up rotating at the wrong ratio to work well. Additionally, I had a dashboard-mounted speed indicator, but the diabolical strings of U-joints to get the drive there prevented it from having any accuracy.

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Suspension Adjustment:

There are two more L-motors, one for each axle, that adjust the ride height using two small linear actuators. Unfortunately, this too was overwhelmed by the weight of the car, but still had a minimal effect.

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Windshield Wipers:

The final function is the windshield wipers, controlled by an M-motor through some complicated linkages. It is a rather fun model to include.

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Other Images:

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Tractor tires? you may ask

To which I would reply, "Why not?"

Conclusion:

I am very glad to bring this model to a close (And this lengthy post!). It took me over four months to build, which is crazy for me! My previous most complex car took little more than one month! I think the aesthetics were poor, but about all I expected of my mechanically-minded self. The functionality was, naturally, the focus of the car, and I was pleased to stuff so much complexity into a single car. However, not surprisingly, over-complicated mechanicals prevented the car from performing well. Another feature I tried to include was refinement, especially in the interior, and I think I succeeded. I am glad to have built this, but I may not ever try to top it, because I am disinclined to put in that much hard work again!

 

Edited by 2GodBDGlory

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This car is a technical marvel. The amount of functions and different systems going on under the body are just mind blowing.

I think that most of the members here will skip past this post as soon as they see the poor formatting and square body, but those who bother to read the whole post will be blown away like me.

This is an awesome build. Good job!

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The amount of technical/mechanical stuff going on here is indeed mind blowing. I read and watched the entire post, but still only understood half of what is happening (and I do not consider myself a noob on this matter...). The belly shot with the everything-spaghetti going on is making my head spin, I dare not watch that pic again :wacko: :laugh:.

OK, looks might not be top notch, but still it is recognizable what you wanted to achieve, so good enough. I'm actually surprised you were even able to come up with a reasonably coherent body to cover all mechanics. And it is nice to see some LBG bodywork, not a lot of people use that color.

All-in-all: nice job, sir!

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Yea, you might get some negative comments on the looks, but I second some of the comments made already.  Lots of technical stuff going on here.... lots of great technical stuff and other stuff that is well, still undecipherable. 

Perhaps something constructive to say would be if there is not much to the looks of your model, but a ton of stuff to see functionally, would be to take some time and make a good video of the functions.  You have added lots of photos and some text, which is helpful, but you will lose some folks (and partly me) when many are fuzzy and unreadable.  You have obviously taken a lot of time to build this great model, take a little time to make a video or better photos to properly display it!

But overall great job and have to admit, it looks like you had a blast building it.  So complex!

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Posted (edited)
22 minutes ago, nerdsforprez said:

Yea, you might get some negative comments on the looks, but I second some of the comments made already.  Lots of technical stuff going on here.... lots of great technical stuff and other stuff that is well, still undecipherable. 

Perhaps something constructive to say would be if there is not much to the looks of your model, but a ton of stuff to see functionally, would be to take some time and make a good video of the functions.  You have added lots of photos and some text, which is helpful, but you will lose some folks (and partly me) when many are fuzzy and unreadable.  You have obviously taken a lot of time to build this great model, take a little time to make a video or better photos to properly display it!

But overall great job and have to admit, it looks like you had a blast building it.  So complex!

Thanks!

As for the video, I do have one posted on YouTube, and I put the link at the bottom. I would like to embed it, but I am not sure how. My video is pretty low-quality, though, since I would rather build Lego than edit videos...

Edited by 2GodBDGlory

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19 minutes ago, 2GodBDGlory said:

I would like to embed it, but I am not sure how.

Go to your vid on Youtube, right-mouse click on it and select 'copy video url' (2nd option from the top, I'm using Chrome browser in Dutch, so I'm not exactly sure about the menu options for other languages or browsers), and just paste in here. It should automatically create an embedded video even while you are still in editing mode.

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Posted (edited)

This is awesomely insane :pir-love: The rugged looks and the mind-blowing amount of functions make it an instant winner for me, even if it's mechanically rough around the edges. It has an old-school vibe that's missing from all the more recent supercars.

One thing you might do if and when you feel like it is redesign the chassis so as to make it stiffer. That would also solve the issue with the doors.

Anyway, phenomenal work!

Edited by suffocation

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This is the sort of build that you could spend years and years refining to make the functions work half as well as they ideally should, and you managed to make them work at least in principle in few months. The outside certainly needs attention to make it less blocky, but I don't think I've ever come across a car MOC with anywhere near the amount of functions crammed in one model. You made functions that never even crossed my mind to be replicated in Lego, like the airbag. Kudos to you.

One complaint/criticism I have: those paper parts on rims and for various indicators look really out of place. Maybe replace them with computer-designed and printed+laminated versions or something?

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What the hell dude, this thing is...different? There are more functions crammed into this thing than I can keep count of while reading.

For me LEGO Technic MOC building is all about making compromises. Sometimes you have to compromise on the looks a little for function. Other times you may have to scrap a function to get the desired look. But it should always be in balance, to create a beautiful Model, both inside and outside. And most importantly: everything has to be stable and reliable.

Your focus was only on cramming in more functions, and that's why the outside looks absolutely terrible, I am sorry. And it does not look like is has a lot of structural integrity as well, I can't see any reinforcements in the belly shot.

While I do respect the build, I do not like it. It is just too one-sided for my taste.

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So so much going on in this. How many servo motors do you have?!  In fact how many motors total? I could go through and count myself but it would take a while...

I'm a sucker for functions and this seems to have them all, I really like the novel idea of a Lego airbag. Whilst not actually a function the minifig hands for speedo needles is a nice touch.

I'm interested in your build process. Did you do any prior planning digitally or just build? Was the body shape limited by existing functions or part availability? Whilst the turning headlights are great maybe sacrificing one small feature would have allowed a large change in shaping.

Finally when photographing MOCs try putting your phone on a 2 second timer to reduce shake.

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Brilliant mechanical MOC, and certainly many unique functions included. The car is recogniseable enough, but needs a lot of improvement, maybe allowing first some gaps could help develop better panelling in the future))) 

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Well, this is something different. The post is nearly unreadable though. It would really help to only present a few good photos instead of a lot of bad quality ones.
Having said that, it certainly is an interesting build. I'm especially intrigued by the dual clutch gearbox. What is the purpose of the middle wave-selector? It looks like it engages the old catchover switch, but that doesn't seem to engage with any clutchgear besides it.

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What an incredible amount of features. Maybe this would work better as a generic 8880 style supercar than a specific model? Then you could just make bodywork that looked cool and fitted everything in without the constraints of having to follow the lines of the Bugatti?

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1 hour ago, Gray Gear said:

What the hell dude, this thing is...different? There are more functions crammed into this thing than I can keep count of while reading.

For me LEGO Technic MOC building is all about making compromises. Sometimes you have to compromise on the looks a little for function. Other times you may have to scrap a function to get the desired look. But it should always be in balance, to create a beautiful Model, both inside and outside. And most importantly: everything has to be stable and reliable.

Your focus was only on cramming in more functions, and that's why the outside looks absolutely terrible, I am sorry. And it does not look like is has a lot of structural integrity as well, I can't see any reinforcements in the belly shot.

While I do respect the build, I do not like it. It is just too one-sided for my taste.

@Gray Gear I could not agree more.

As pointed out by others, the post has way to many photo's of which most don't even make sense to post here since we have no idea what is going on or it's just an unimportant detail. Post a link to your gallery where you host your picures in the future and make a selection of about 15 pictures to put in the EB post.

 

 

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I can't say anything else than OH MY GOD!

So many functions! Congratulations man! 

Simply amazed

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Every time I read a new post I learn new things.
It is good to see someone share some new ideas new designs and I absolutely happy to see someone posted another Bugatti cars (my second fav brand).

I do agree the car is a little bit of rough and blocky, that is something that even I did take a long--------time to take over with.
I will suggest to try to use more technic panel and carved parts, to re-create to smoothly shape of the body frame.
6q05CPl.png 

Keep going! Good one!

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Hey you know what? I applaud this... We see too many cars claiming to be 'super' that are just a gearbox with a pretty shell. This may not be pretty, but its what technic used to be about and still should be. Going crazy and building stuff! No ldd, not intended to sit on a shelf gathering dust.

Its even got an airbag?!! The builder admits its not as beautiful as others, but i don't care... i absolutely love the sheer technicality of it. Sure there's reliability issues, but they can be fixed. V2 will be better, V3 better still.. progressive refinement is the JOY of lego. Its what lego should be about, not perfection on V1 and sealing it in a display case. Nothing replaces the crazy joy of building, and building, and building with real bricks. Wedging that extra function in and creating a hugely complex beast that has a life of its own!! And i suspect when modifications are started, it will fight back!! Like all great moc's do!

We all know there are issues.... but so what. The awesomeness, the craziness, the AMBITION beats all of that... dull suspension and a gearbox in a pretty shell isn't very ambitious any more.. I love this for just having the balls to go for it!!!

..in fact remember the good old days when official sets were a 'car chassis'? Ditch the bodywork.. show off the functionality. Display it in all its complex glory!

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Wow.

...I guess.

Now this is something different. For one, this is one of those models where "color vomit" would have definitely helped. The problem I think is this: when you (the builder) take a picture, you know what part of the car your camera is viewing. But when I, as a viewer, see a detail photo, I have no clue what part of the car I am looking at. It's all looking the same. And most of what you're showing, are details.

You can show a gearbox, or a pump, etc., but I have no idea where in the car that sits. There's a LOT going on, that's for sure, and there seem to be many things I can't even imagine putting in a Technic car, but to me as an unfamiliar onlooker, it looks like a jumbled mess of functions. It's all gray, and I can't focus on one part because everything seems to "blend" into one another - I don't know what parts belong together and which parts belong to different functions. As an example, I happen to have a supercar chassis in the works too, and without wanting to hijack the topic, please allow me to show 1 underside picture:

Spoiler

supercar2020_take1_underside.jpg

 

Now, color-wise, this may be the other extreme (sorry) and I have no idea what will change in the process or if I'll even finish it, and I don't want to say my model is good or whatever, and it has far less going on than yours, I know. But you'll immediately notice one axle has lime accents and the other orange. So if I show a close-up of an axle, and you see lime accents, you know it's the front, so you can "mentally" put it somewhere and relate it to other photos that have the lime parts. Also you'll immediately notice the dark-gray bricks which can only be one thing - the main chassis - which also provides some sort of visual "landmark" where other sections are positioned relative to. (Also, the colors could help talking about the model. I could say "this green beam controls the ___"). You can't do that if everything looks similar.

What's interesting, is that in my opinion, the model, the video and the post are all having the same 2 flaws:

  • It's too much
  • It lacks structure

The model is huge, the video is almost half an hour and the post is probably more than 100 photos. Just as the model looks like a jumbled mess of Technic-ness (to the untrained eye - I'm sure it all makes sense to you as the builder, but remember, you can see it, hold it, touch it, control things, see it move, etc.), the post looks like a jumbled mess of (mostly too dark or blurred) photos, which buries the (quite informative!) textual explanations, which is a shame, and the video doesn't seem to have subtitles or "sections" (not sure if your video editing program could do that).

One very obvious thing that I seem to be missing is a simple and concise list of functions. Why haven't you started your writing with just a bullet-list such as

  • Front suspension: steering + drive + camber + ___ (whatever more)
  • Rear suspension: ___
  • Gearbox: ___ gears + RNDP selector
  • Steering, driven by ___ motor(s), connected to gearbox and headlights
  • Pneumatic small pump(s), driven by ___ motor [in the middle of the car]
  • Pneumatic functions:
    • ___
    • ___
  • ___

This would tremendously help viewers/readers in appreciating the complexity of the model. And seeing your model, your list would be huge and invite people to read along and find out more. Also notice how in my post (which is quite long), the list provides a structure to the writing.

So, I think you have made a rather unique and potentially super interesting model, that could inspire some long-time builders. but if I were to give one advice, I'd say: try to bring some structure to it all.

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Posted (edited)
On 5/22/2020 at 4:24 PM, 2GodBDGlory said:

 My video is pretty low-quality, though, since I would rather build Lego than edit videos...

Fair enough.  But it seems like presentation is a fairly consistent theme others have critiqued as well, and, well, lets be honest, you shared for a reason. 

Most folks at some point want their hobbies to be relevant not just to themselves, but to others as well.  Same with most artists.  We all seek relevance in what we do, in work and in play.  I suspect that is why you shared. 

So, perhaps you might want to consider that sharing with others is part of "playing" with Lego as well.  Perhaps not as much as building, but "playing' nonetheless.  That perspective might help you get motivated to put a little more time and effort in your model's presentation. Like Erik mentioned above, you might have a really, really great model.  But if it is not presented in a digestible manner, we won't ever know it. 

Edited by nerdsforprez

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15 hours ago, ukbajadave said:

So so much going on in this. How many servo motors do you have?!  In fact how many motors total? I could go through and count myself but it would take a while...

I'm a sucker for functions and this seems to have them all, I really like the novel idea of a Lego airbag. Whilst not actually a function the minifig hands for speedo needles is a nice touch.

I'm interested in your build process. Did you do any prior planning digitally or just build? Was the body shape limited by existing functions or part availability? Whilst the turning headlights are great maybe sacrificing one small feature would have allowed a large change in shaping.

Finally when photographing MOCs try putting your phone on a 2 second timer to reduce shake.

I currently have three servo motors, plus two that died on me. I think I have 17 motors total, and I think I used 13 or 14 in this model.

I thought the airbag was pretty neat too, though it isn't actually original (I came up with the idea myself, and then did a YouTube search, and discovered I had been beaten too it--just not in a complete model).

My build process is fairly simple. I don't do any digital planning, and just start with the most complicated mechanisms. In this model, first I built the gearbox, then the axles, then installed the drivetrain, connected the axles, added the rest of the internal functions, built the interior and doors, added the exterior-related functions, and then finished the exterior. Yes, the body shape was definitely limited. For example, the rear end ended up being very squared off because of the position of the IR receivers right in the corner, and I am generally unwilling to buy new parts for each model I make, so I was limited by parts somewhat.

Thanks for the tip for photographing; I can try that sometime.

15 hours ago, Jeroen Ottens said:

Well, this is something different. The post is nearly unreadable though. It would really help to only present a few good photos instead of a lot of bad quality ones.
Having said that, it certainly is an interesting build. I'm especially intrigued by the dual clutch gearbox. What is the purpose of the middle wave-selector? It looks like it engages the old catchover switch, but that doesn't seem to engage with any clutchgear besides it.

I suppose I could try adjusting my photo strategy for my next model.

The middle selector does engage with the old catchover switch, but rather than meshing with clutch gears, I used the body of the piece to slide the 20T and 24T gears beside it to mesh with other gears. I find that the new catchover switches are more resistant to skipping than the old ones, and I had used all four of my new-style ones in the two 4-speeds, so rather than put in a relatively light-duty and gear-limited (but smooth-shifting) setup, I opted for a heavy-duty sliding gear setup, and found that that was the most convenient way to control it with the rotary shifters.

14 hours ago, MinusAndy said:

What an incredible amount of features. Maybe this would work better as a generic 8880 style supercar than a specific model? Then you could just make bodywork that looked cool and fitted everything in without the constraints of having to follow the lines of the Bugatti?

I understand the reasoning behind making this a more genaric car; in fact, my previous shot at ultimate complexity followed exactly that route (You can see it here). However, I was displeased with its final aesthetic, and I figured that for this model I would try to take advantage of the work of highly-paid automotive designers. Of course, it did mean I had less flexibility, and lost some of the accuracy I wanted. There are pros and cons of both routes.

 

13 hours ago, T Lego said:

@Gray Gear I could not agree more.

As pointed out by others, the post has way to many photo's of which most don't even make sense to post here since we have no idea what is going on or it's just an unimportant detail. Post a link to your gallery where you host your picures in the future and make a selection of about 15 pictures to put in the EB post.

 

 

Okay, I can do that next time. This is my first post on EuroBricks, so I guess I am still learning the etiquette here.

2 hours ago, Erik Leppen said:

Wow.

...I guess.

Now this is something different. For one, this is one of those models where "color vomit" would have definitely helped. The problem I think is this: when you (the builder) take a picture, you know what part of the car your camera is viewing. But when I, as a viewer, see a detail photo, I have no clue what part of the car I am looking at. It's all looking the same. And most of what you're showing, are details.

You can show a gearbox, or a pump, etc., but I have no idea where in the car that sits. There's a LOT going on, that's for sure, and there seem to be many things I can't even imagine putting in a Technic car, but to me as an unfamiliar onlooker, it looks like a jumbled mess of functions. It's all gray, and I can't focus on one part because everything seems to "blend" into one another - I don't know what parts belong together and which parts belong to different functions. As an example, I happen to have a supercar chassis in the works too, and without wanting to hijack the topic, please allow me to show 1 underside picture:

  Reveal hidden contents

supercar2020_take1_underside.jpg

 

Now, color-wise, this may be the other extreme (sorry) and I have no idea what will change in the process or if I'll even finish it, and I don't want to say my model is good or whatever, and it has far less going on than yours, I know. But you'll immediately notice one axle has lime accents and the other orange. So if I show a close-up of an axle, and you see lime accents, you know it's the front, so you can "mentally" put it somewhere and relate it to other photos that have the lime parts. Also you'll immediately notice the dark-gray bricks which can only be one thing - the main chassis - which also provides some sort of visual "landmark" where other sections are positioned relative to. (Also, the colors could help talking about the model. I could say "this green beam controls the ___"). You can't do that if everything looks similar.

What's interesting, is that in my opinion, the model, the video and the post are all having the same 2 flaws:

  • It's too much
  • It lacks structure

The model is huge, the video is almost half an hour and the post is probably more than 100 photos. Just as the model looks like a jumbled mess of Technic-ness (to the untrained eye - I'm sure it all makes sense to you as the builder, but remember, you can see it, hold it, touch it, control things, see it move, etc.), the post looks like a jumbled mess of (mostly too dark or blurred) photos, which buries the (quite informative!) textual explanations, which is a shame, and the video doesn't seem to have subtitles or "sections" (not sure if your video editing program could do that).

One very obvious thing that I seem to be missing is a simple and concise list of functions. Why haven't you started your writing with just a bullet-list such as

  • Front suspension: steering + drive + camber + ___ (whatever more)
  • Rear suspension: ___
  • Gearbox: ___ gears + RNDP selector
  • Steering, driven by ___ motor(s), connected to gearbox and headlights
  • Pneumatic small pump(s), driven by ___ motor [in the middle of the car]
  • Pneumatic functions:
    • ___
    • ___
  • ___

This would tremendously help viewers/readers in appreciating the complexity of the model. And seeing your model, your list would be huge and invite people to read along and find out more. Also notice how in my post (which is quite long), the list provides a structure to the writing.

So, I think you have made a rather unique and potentially super interesting model, that could inspire some long-time builders. but if I were to give one advice, I'd say: try to bring some structure to it all.

Well, I have already disassembled this model, so it is too late for any mechanical changes, but I see your point about the list of functions. I will add that soon!

5 hours ago, TeamThrifty said:

Hey you know what? I applaud this... We see too many cars claiming to be 'super' that are just a gearbox with a pretty shell. This may not be pretty, but its what technic used to be about and still should be. Going crazy and building stuff! No ldd, not intended to sit on a shelf gathering dust.

Its even got an airbag?!! The builder admits its not as beautiful as others, but i don't care... i absolutely love the sheer technicality of it. Sure there's reliability issues, but they can be fixed. V2 will be better, V3 better still.. progressive refinement is the JOY of lego. Its what lego should be about, not perfection on V1 and sealing it in a display case. Nothing replaces the crazy joy of building, and building, and building with real bricks. Wedging that extra function in and creating a hugely complex beast that has a life of its own!! And i suspect when modifications are started, it will fight back!! Like all great moc's do!

We all know there are issues.... but so what. The awesomeness, the craziness, the AMBITION beats all of that... dull suspension and a gearbox in a pretty shell isn't very ambitious any more.. I love this for just having the balls to go for it!!!

..in fact remember the good old days when official sets were a 'car chassis'? Ditch the bodywork.. show off the functionality. Display it in all its complex glory!

Thanks! I appreciate that, and agree with your comments!

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On 5/24/2020 at 12:43 AM, 2GodBDGlory said:

Well, I have already disassembled this model

That sounds just like me... i rarely keep anything built for long. The fun for me is in the building process, the puzzles and challenges, the trying and failing, and sometimes the success! But then i want to start the process again. Looking at the finished model has a short-lived appeal for me.

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12 hours ago, TeamThrifty said:

That sounds just like me... i rarely keep anything built for long. The fun for me is in the building process, the puzzles and challenges, the trying and failing, and sometimes the success! But then i want to start the process again. Looking at the finished model has a short-lived appeal for me.

Yeah. If I had the money and space to keep all my models built, that would be nice, but I usually can't make much progress on my next model until I get more parts freed up, so I disassemble stuff fast.

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