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Hello everyone! In december I started my drift-car project. I made the chassis witn 1 Buggy Motor & Buwizz. Than, after 2 months of work, car looked like this:
You can check out the album here:https://flic.kr/s/aHsmNkgWWC

P3290734

 

But, my friends said that the chassis is very bad & that was true, so I refreshed all the chassis.

P3290740P3290741

The old chassis...

The new one:

P5200044

 

P5200045

 

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My goal is to make car very good at drifting(it drifts nice already), make it very similar to the original. I think I will end the project soon. But I want to make some detalisation - box with tofu in trunk, make some engine detalisation & make a safety cell. I also want to make some interior like steering wheel or seats, but it will be hard to make it because there's a Buwizz there.

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Posted (edited)

You must make a vid with the background music of:

 

Edited by Ivorrr
forgot the link

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1 hour ago, Ivorrr said:

You must make a vid with the background music of:

 

Yeah, I have my own YouTube channel and I'm planning to make a video with this car... But I want to use this soundtrack from Initial D, it's not popular but I like it!


P.S. This is my best MOC for now, because I started to making Technic MOCs only in July 2019...

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While it is possible to make a Lego car that car briefly loose traction outdoors, I've never seen a Lego vehicle that could sustain a drift, so my current thinking is that level of performance is reserved to hobby grace RC or those that are able to do so on frozen lakes. The more buggy motors, the better the chance, but lego gears aren't deigned to transmit those sort of forces and will most likely give up. However, whip the tyres off what you've already got and I'm prepared to bet it would make for a pretty spectacular indoor drift car on a hard surface, and would be a lot of fun.

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I was suprised because I also trying make AE86 drift machine.

But your model is very different with me.

Anyway, some guy who made drift car out of lego in this small scale, he use some tape to tire for lower friction. I recommend this for video. 

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Posted (edited)

Hello again!
Today I'm gonna show you how this little monster drifts. In the videos I didn't use any tape. Only standart tires. In the video where the car drift without lights it's 4WD on. On the video where the lights are turned on it's RWD on. 

You can check the videos here(the link doesn't work,so I can't share the videos here): https://www.flickr.com/photos/188506193@N05/

 

 

8 hours ago, msk6003 said:

I was suprised because I also trying make AE86 drift machine.

But your model is very different with me.

Anyway, some guy who made drift car out of lego in this small scale, he use some tape to tire for lower friction. I recommend this for video. 

Thanks!

12 hours ago, CrankyCraig said:

While it is possible to make a Lego car that car briefly loose traction outdoors, I've never seen a Lego vehicle that could sustain a drift, so my current thinking is that level of performance is reserved to hobby grace RC or those that are able to do so on frozen lakes. The more buggy motors, the better the chance, but lego gears aren't deigned to transmit those sort of forces and will most likely give up. However, whip the tyres off what you've already got and I'm prepared to bet it would make for a pretty spectacular indoor drift car on a hard surface, and would be a lot of fun.

Yes, drifting on this car is very cool!

Edited by Kosmoss Lego Lab

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Posted (edited)

Looking good, great job. AWD is the way to go as RWD is too difficult to control, you just need less traction and a bit more space to get a really spectacular drift going. Oh, and a couple of items to drift around in a figure 8. 

You can use tape, but in my experience plastic wheels are much better, as it's it doesn't take tape long to separate from the tyre. The other thing you can experiment with to fine tune it is changing the weight distribution by moving the battery box between the front and the back.

Have fun!

Edited by CrankyCraig
SP.

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46 minutes ago, CrankyCraig said:

Looking good, great job. AWD is the way to go as RWD is too difficult to control, you just need less traction and a bit more space to get a really spectacular drift going. Oh, and a couple of items to drift around in a figure 8. 

You can use tape, but in my experience plastic wheels are much better, as it's it doesn't take tape long to separate from the tyre. The other thing you can experiment with to fine tune it is changing the weight distribution by moving the battery box between the front and the back.

Have fun!

Thanks! I'll use your suggestions in my car, thanks a lot!

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One thing you could do is keep modifying the steering so you get more and more steering angle. The closer you get to 90 degrees the better. 

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4 hours ago, JoshsTechnicWorkshop said:

How about this:wink:

Sorry, what I'd meant was outdoors on rougher surfaces (and so with rubber tyres), but on re-reading my post I can see that may not have been clear.

It's not that it's impossible outdoors, it's just that it's impractical with Lego. What the OP has built will be just as fun indoors, but won't be as demanding on the materials.

3 hours ago, Mechbuilds said:

One thing you could do is keep modifying the steering so you get more and more steering angle. The closer you get to 90 degrees the better. 

In reality, on an AWD RC car, once the drift is initiated, there's no need to balance the car with counter-steering. That's why AWD is so much fun. RWD is much more difficult and does require counter-steering, where a greater steering angle matters and finding that delicate balance between throttle and steering angle is hard to the point of being frustrating, especially without proportional controls.

I'd recommend anyone with a suitable surface in your home to give one a try. Even without buggy motors, they're still a blast!

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21 hours ago, CrankyCraig said:

Sorry, what I'd meant was outdoors on rougher surfaces (and so with rubber tyres), but on re-reading my post I can see that may not have been clear.

It's not that it's impossible outdoors, it's just that it's impractical with Lego. What the OP has built will be just as fun indoors, but won't be as demanding on the materials.

In reality, on an AWD RC car, once the drift is initiated, there's no need to balance the car with counter-steering. That's why AWD is so much fun. RWD is much more difficult and does require counter-steering, where a greater steering angle matters and finding that delicate balance between throttle and steering angle is hard to the point of being frustrating, especially without proportional controls.

I'd recommend anyone with a suitable surface in your home to give one a try. Even without buggy motors, they're still a blast!

I agree with you, in lego AWD drift there's no need in big steering radius, but the steering must be configured very well because if the steering radius will be too small it will be very difficult to enter in a turn and then turn out the wheels for control of skid.

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On 5/22/2020 at 2:28 AM, CrankyCraig said:

Sorry, what I'd meant was outdoors on rougher surfaces (and so with rubber tyres)

Now that comes down the vehicle's weight or you'll need a proper handbrake like Attika did, I'm working on one with awd but sadly it doesn't seem to drive with those rubber tires on since the car is wayyyy too heavy. :grin:

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14 hours ago, JoshsTechnicWorkshop said:

Now that comes down the vehicle's weight or you'll need a proper handbrake like Attika did, I'm working on one with awd but sadly it doesn't seem to drive with those rubber tires on since the car is wayyyy too heavy. :grin:

This is intended in no way as a criticism of Lego, but while Lego electrics are great for demonstrating function, they just aren't designed for high performance. There are a few RC areas that work reasonably well with Lego, such as crawlers, but the performance in most areas is underwhelming in comparison to hobby grade RC of similar cost.

It's comparable to turning your grandmothers car into a track car. Sure, it can be done, but with it's 1.nothingwhatsoever engine and roly-poly suspension, it'll take a lot of time, money and effort to make it close to comparable with anything built with track intentions by design. 

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