SavaTheAggie

[MOC] Santa Fe Union Terminal

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49479069256_52279307e9.jpgSantaFeUnionTerminal_13 by Tony Sava, on Flickr

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Several years ago,.I attempted to design a LEGO version of the former Santa Fe Union Terminal on Galveston Island, Texas, now known as Moody Plaza and home to the Galveston Railroad Museum.  That digital MOC was too large, 2x5 baseplates, and would have taken up almost an entire club table to itself.

So this last summer/fall I decided to redesign it selectively compressed so that it would fit on 1x3 baseplates, and after placing many Bricklink orders it is complete.

49479075686_4170899d45.jpgSantaFeUnionTerminal_01 by Tony Sava, on Flickr

The finished MOC is too large for my house, so I can't set it up for pictures there.  Fortunately the Galveston Railroad Museum was generous enough to allow me to set it up on their property, allowing for a great backdrop.

49479063316_66d3827869.jpgSantaFeUnionTerminal_23 by Tony Sava, on Flickr

The terminal building served as the headquarters of the Santa Fe Railroad, and was built in three phases.  First the southern office building was built (on the right, above), which stood for several years.  Next, the original red brick terminal building was replaced with a building matching the art-deco stylings of it's neighbor.  Finally, the road between them was closed and a central, 13-story tower was constructed.

49479067681_9c3a310a67.jpgSantaFeUnionTerminal_16 by Tony Sava, on Flickr

This is why, from the front, the building looks unified as a single whole, but I'm the back it looks disjointed.

49479068771_446378148e.jpgSantaFeUnionTerminal_14 by Tony Sava, on Flickr

I wanted to mimic the texture of the real building, so the white areas of the building made with larger stones was built with all 1x2 white bricks...

49478585143_eff1af7952.jpgSantaFeUnionTerminal_18 by Tony Sava, on Flickr

And the tan masonry bricks on the rear of the building done using all 1x2 tan plates.

49479065226_6fb097dd82.jpgSantaFeUnionTerminal_20 by Tony Sava, on Flickr

I also built passenger platforms and the courtyard just as they are now, with artistic license.  

49478583348_ed4b0e8eb1.jpgSantaFeUnionTerminal_21 by Tony Sava, on Flickr

There are several out-buildings I did not include due to size restraints, some are historical, some were built for the museum.  I was able, however, to capture the palm tree lined courtyard and gazebo.

49479283457_592616d081.jpgSantaFeUnionTerminal_24 by Tony Sava, on Flickr

I even went so far as to build the locomotive and caboose the museum calls "The Harborside Express", which takes visitors on short excursions.

49479278057_f6c28aa02c.jpgSantaFeUnionTerminal_32 by Tony Sava, on Flickr

I even attempted to include the original cobblestone platform leftover from the original Terminal building, which can be seen at the real museum at the end of the platform between tracks 4 and 5.

49478573208_3cfc69d683.jpgSantaFeUnionTerminal_37 by Tony Sava, on Flickr

All told, not including the trains and figs, there are over 20,000 parts invested in the entire complex.  And while I set out to build a MOC of the Santa Fe Union Terminal building, I ended up making a MOC of the Galveston Railroad Museum itself (mostly).  

--Tony

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This is great. I was there before it was underwater in the hurricane (I have never understood why - with plenty of warning - they chose to let their rolling stock sustain millions in damages, rather than just MOVE them). 

Do San Diego next!

santafetrainstation-is-474787408-1233x86

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That's really outstanding, Tony. I'll have to visit the museum the next time I'm in Houston to visit my son.

Dave

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That is an amazing build (as is your norm), all of the detail on the platform side really comes alive.

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On 2/3/2020 at 6:16 PM, SteamSewnEmpire said:

This is great. I was there before it was underwater in the hurricane (I have never understood why - with plenty of warning - they chose to let their rolling stock sustain millions in damages, rather than just MOVE them). 

Do San Diego next!

santafetrainstation-is-474787408-1233x86

It's a bit more complex.  The museum doesn't own any tracks off the museum grounds, and there's only one track off the island.  They have to get permission and/or pay to use the lines, and prior to a hurricane the rail companies are more concerned with their assets and customer property than the museum's. 

As for San Diego, I'm focusing mostly on Texas buildings and rail lines.

On 2/3/2020 at 6:29 PM, Carefree_Dude said:

It all looks really nice! 

 

I have a question; what is the largest steam locomotive you've built so far? 

 

Depends on your definition, I suppose.  Longest would be my Yellowstone.  Widest and strongest would be my Allegheny.

On 2/4/2020 at 10:47 AM, bogieman said:

That's really outstanding, Tony. I'll have to visit the museum the next time I'm in Houston to visit my son.

Dave

Definitely worth the trip.  Also be sure to stop at LaKings Confectionery.

 

Thank you, everyone, for your kind words.  I appreciate it.  

--Tony

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Wow. Simply beyond belief.

The upcoming ASMS conference in early summer this year is in Houston - I'll be there. How is public transportation nowadays? For sure I will visit the museum. What is the LaKings Confectionery?

All the best,
Thorsten 

 

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19 hours ago, kieran said:

Great photos or a great build 

Thanks!

19 hours ago, Toastie said:

Wow. Simply beyond belief.

The upcoming ASMS conference in early summer this year is in Houston - I'll be there. How is public transportation nowadays? For sure I will visit the museum. What is the LaKings Confectionery?

All the best,
Thorsten 

 

Houston is just too geographically large for public transportation to make sense.  It's bigger than the state of Rhode Island.  There's a park and ride (I take it everyday to work), but I don't think it runs in weekends and only gets you halfway there.  

All told.its about 46 miles from the heart of Downtown Houston to Downtown Galveston.  If you don't have a rental car your best bet is either Uber or find a local to drive you around.  A trip to Galveston is nothing to us.

LaKings is just a block or so from the museum, and is a candy store that harkens back to the early 1900s.  Most of what they sell is made in-house, but they're most famous for their salt water taffy.  If you show up at the right time you can watch them pull the taffy on a century old equipment, and they toss free samples to the visitors.  My favorite flavor is either watermelon or strawberry.  My wife's is the peanut butter and the chocolate (two different flavors).

They also make Purity brand ice cream, which is a recipe from the early 1900s.  Super premium ice cream that "stretches" as you pull out your spoon (very little air mixed in).  My favorite flavor is the lemon custard.  The mint chocolate chip is good too.

--Tony

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6 hours ago, SavaTheAggie said:

Houston is just too geographically large for public transportation to make sense.  It's bigger than the state of Rhode Island.

I can see that ... but I think it also depends. I live in Northrhine Westfalia (NRW) - area about 34000 km2. Rhode Island is about a 10th of that. When travelling in NRW I always use public transportation. I believe it also depends on the infrastructure provided ...

Thank you very much for the directions! I will certainly visit the Museum! And then enjoy the ice cream ... looking very much forward to do so.

All the best,
Thorsten   

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