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Not really a pirate ship, but a ship nonetheless.

From Wiki

A dromon (from Greek δρόμων, dromōn, "runner") was a type of galley and the most important warship of the Byzantine navy from the 5th to 12th centuries AD, when they were succeeded by Italian-style galleys. It was developed from the ancient liburnian, which was the mainstay of the Roman navy during the Empire.

Dromon Render 1Dromon Render 2

 

 

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Something diffefent from another era, really like that one. Do yiu have more pictures, from different angles? 

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Wow! Yes, this is certainly different... I like it though. Could you imagine how hard it would be to coordinate the double-decker rowing situation? Seems like you'd have to have someone there cracking the whip on everybody. :wink:

Good work!

 

MAC

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On 9/1/2019 at 8:46 PM, DonRamon1981 said:

Something diffefent from another era, really like that one. Do yiu have more pictures, from different angles? 

Yes and with some explanation as well.*oh2*

 

Dromon Front.lxf

On a Dromon the ram found on earlier galleys was replaced by a ”spear”.

On the bow, there was an elevated platform with the weapon known as “greek fire”.

Behind the platform is a windlass, which has similar purposes as the (later) capstan.

The deckspace below and above the upper and lower rowers respectively, is a grid/lattice. This is makes it possible for the rowing soldiers to coordinate the rowing action.

 

On 9/2/2019 at 6:48 PM, iammac said:

Wow! Yes, this is certainly different... I like it though. Could you imagine how hard it would be to coordinate the double-decker rowing situation? Seems like you'd have to have someone there cracking the whip on everybody. :wink:

Good work!

 

MAC

On a sidenote:

Galley slaves was a rarity. Not even the Romans used them and not at all on a war galley.*oh2* Professional rowers or soldiers operated the oars and participated in fighting the enemy when boarding.

...But -Ben Hur-. Yep that is Hollywood for ya. I "knew" about galley slaves before researching the ships as well.:pir-grin:

Dromon Back.lxf

Aft. The Dromon looked similar to older galleys. On later Italian style galleys, a rudder would replace the steering oars.

The elevated platforms on the side are a distinct dromon feature.

Other versions usually have higher platforms or even an elaborate castle centered in the middle.

I found that this made the ship potentially very heavy and/or compromising the use of sails. Not really fitting a shiptype named “runner”.:grin:

 

Edited by Anders T

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Wow, very cool! As far as I can tell this one is to scale and historically correct - impressive! Something you could put in a museum, well done. :thumbup:

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19 hours ago, Darnok said:

Wow, very cool! As far as I can tell this one is to scale and historically correct - impressive! Something you could put in a museum, well done. :thumbup:

Thanks, historical and scale accuracy is indeed some of the goals I have in designing ship models such as this one.

 

Reading your comment, I realize that I omitted some information that I usually give at the start of a topic.

Therefore, here comes a somewhat late introduction.

 

This model resembles a Byzantine Dromon.

It is in minifig-scale or 1:40’ish.

The model will have the dimension Length: 93 cm, Height: 43 cm (with stand), Width: 37 cm (with oars)

There is approx. 4350 bricks in the model.

 

For reference, I have used several models, paintings, drawings and descriptions of the type.

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