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Presenting another Danish train...

DSB IC3

The Danish State Railways’ (DSB) highly successful and innovative InterCity 3 (IC3) passenger train was co-developed by Siemens Duewag in Germany and ABB Scandia in Denmark.

The train is operated by DSB in Denmark and Sweden, by Renfe Operadora in Spain and by Israel Railways in Israel.
Amtrak in the USA and Via Rail in Canada have tested the train in the past.

A trainset consists of three units, two diesel motor units (MFA and MFB) and one intermediary unit (FF).
Up to five trainsets can be coupled together. 

96 trainset were built for DSB from 1989 to 1991.

All are still in service today.

My model:

Room for lights in all headlights and interior.

Scale: 1:50
Lenght: 140 bricks (MFA 46 bricks - FF bricks 40 - MFB 46 bricks)
Width: 7 bricks
Bricks: 2.084 (9v) or 2.079 (PF)
Powered: 2 x 9v or 2 x PF train motors with 2 x battery boxses
Designed: 2017

Digital model but built by me (and many others) irl :classic:

Very high setting render from Stud.io with custom decals done in the PartDesigner tool.

Free building instructions:
DSB IC3 9v variant here
DSB IC3 PF variant here


DSB original white and red livery of the 1990-2000s:

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View from the side - unfortunately the wide gab between the units is necessary to run through R40 curved tracks smoothly:

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Access to the interior with seating for 54 minifig passengers, 2 train drivers and additional space for 2 bicycles, standing passengers, stewards and 2 toilet guests:

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FF unit (PF) with 2 IR Receivers, 2 Battery Boxes and 1 Polarity Switch:

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Technique used for the sliding toilet doors - turning the Pneumatic T Piece 90° behind the seat keeps the door shut when closed:

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Youtube video from fellow Danish LUG member Knud Ahrnell Albrechtsen: 

Edited by dtomsen

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I always love this model, the front looks like if goes into a clean wall it will be stuck like a suction cup :P

Nice job!

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39 minutes ago, Sérgio said:

I always love this model, the front looks like if goes into a clean wall it will be stuck like a suction cup :P

Thanks!

Suction is more or less the idea :grin:

From wikipedia:
"The front- and cab-design is the most significant feature of the IC3 (and its cousins). When viewed from the outside, the viewer will notice the large rubber diaphragm surrounding a flat cab. The cab is separate department in the train, but the table with the controls are mounted on a huge door, to which the seat is also mounted. When two or more units are coupled together in a single train, the entire front door folds away to give a wide passage, and the rubber diaphragms at the ends form a flush aerodynamic seal."

Edited by dtomsen

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Super MOC of a funny looking train. My favourite detail is, that you even took care that the chairs are aligned with the windows.

55 minutes ago, dtomsen said:

"(...), and the rubber diaphragms at the ends form a flush aerodynamic seal."

I guess that's the only aerodynamic part of the train:grin:

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2 hours ago, Stefaneris said:

I guess that's the only aerodynamic part of the train:grin:

Not really a problem, as the IC3 is more built for quick accelerations and smooth stops (then all-out speed) suited for the short distances between stations in small countries like Denmark.
Top speed is only 180 km/h or 111.85 mph.

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I really like the use of red for some color. Not sure if that's how this train always looks but either way its very easy on the eyes!

Well done

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18 minutes ago, LEGO Train 12 Volts said:

Very well made ...I like the shared bogie :wub:

Great video, thanks for sharing! :thumbup:

I love this train as well. Nice work. That shared boogie looks a little awkward to me though, with the unnecessary pin in the middle, and the pins on the end certainly take up room in the car. I wonder if you might benefit from using a turntable instead like I did on my shared bogies, all my trucks actually use this turntable. 

2019-08-02_02-49-40

 

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1 hour ago, sed6 said:

That shared boogie looks a little awkward to me though, with the unnecessary pin in the middle, and the pins on the end certainly take up room in the car. I wonder if you might benefit from using a turntable instead like I did on my shared bogies, all my trucks actually use this turntable.

I definitely agree but unfortunately the placement of the train motors as Jacobs bogies proved the better PF solution in practice than having the train motors placed in the far ends. The weight of the battery boxes gave a much firmer grip and didn’t require lengthy cables running underneath from the train motors in the far ends to the battery boxes in the mid-unit.

A fragile and prone-to-break pin solution spaced a bit closer together was used at first for the Jacobs boogies but the more robust-but-farther-apart pin solution chosen proved far superior in that aspect. Almost unbreakable 😁

A turntable instead of a pin would block the power cables behind the train motors from being pulled up (towards the free pin on top of the train motors) and through a hole in the doors in both ends of the mid-unit. Also a pin through a 1 x 1 hole is an easier solution for a 7-wide base than a turntable. I hope this makes sense without a picture 🙂

Brick-built and better-looking Jacobs boogies could have been used for the 9v version but my goal of using the same basic building teamplate for both versions (needed for the instructions) killed that idea. And all boogies on the train are identical anyways.

Make no mistake, I would have loved a better-looking solution too but couldn’t find any without serveral drawbacks and so simplicity and durability won out in the end 🙂

Edited by dtomsen

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An excellent representation of the "bumper-trains", the first trains I saw in Denmark :grin:! Everything about your model is neat and clean from top to bottom, and faithful to the prototype.

Regarding the annoying but necessary gaps; how does the set look with the cars closer together, even if they can't run that way?

Finally, I'm comparing notes on the prototype; Denmark went for moving the entire control panel and window to convert a large cab to a large gangway, wheras British Rail decided with it's class 150/153/156 etc to squeeze in fixed and narrow cabs, gangways and guard's compartments on each end instead!

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3 minutes ago, ColletArrow said:

Regarding the annoying but necessary gaps; how does the set look with the cars closer together, even if they can't run that way?

Much better 🙂

Fellow Danish LUG and Eurobrick member Esben Kolind designed some Jacobs bogies serveral years ago for his Öresundstrain with flexible connectors and rubber bands being pulled apart in curves and pulled closer on straight tracks. Unfortunately this required unavailable space on my train - otherwise I would probably have (ahem) borrowed his solution 😁

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2 hours ago, dtomsen said:

I definitely agree but unfortunately the placement of the train motors as Jacobs bogies proved the better PF solution in practice than having the train motors placed in the far ends. The weight of the battery boxes gave a much firmer grip and didn’t require lengthy cables running underneath from the train motors in the far ends to the battery boxes in the mid-unit... 🙂

Oh, wow, it didn't dawn on me those bogies were powered. You solution and explanation are great! Thanks for enlightening us! FWIW, I think the spacing between the cars is great as is, don't let that bother you. 

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