Tenderlok

MOC: 1/22.5 scale Kitson-Meyer 0-6-6-0T - Ferrocarril de Taltal (Chile)

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Posted (edited)

Dear trainheads,

Finally, my new locomotive is ready!

This time, I chose a prototype from quite a distant edge of the world - an articulated narrow-gauge (1067 mm) 0-6-6-0T "Kitson-Meyer" engine belonging to the Chilean "Ferrocarril de Taltal" (FCT; written as "Ferro Carril Taltal“ on locomotive number plates), or "Taltal Railway".

Ten of these locomotives were delivered to the FCT by Kitson & Co. (Leeds, UK) between 1904 and 1907, and further eight engines later acquired second-hand.
Over the years, several modifications were carried out: For example, all engines were converted to burn oil soon. Water and fuel capacity of some locomotives (including No. 50, the prototype for my model) were increased by adding welded enlargements on top of the side and rear tanks.

"The Railway Magazine" gives a short description of the FCT (Vol. 90. No. 551, May-June, 1944, pp.158—159):

Spoiler

"The Taltal Railway of Chile is [...] located within the so-called “rainless belt” and serves the department from which it takes its name in the southern part of the province of Antofagasta, which is situated in the north of the country. Its principal source of revenue is the traffic provided by the nitrate industry, for which Chile is well known, and [...] it is the only railway connecting the territory through which it runs with the port of Taltal, on the Pacific Ocean.

It connects with the Northern Longitudinal Railway at Catalina. The line was opened for traffic on October 20, 1882, and the company now owns 160 miles of single track (including 68 miles of branch lines); the gauge throughout is 3 ft. 6 in. [...]

Apart from nitrate, the Taltal Railway is concerned with the carriage of coal, mineral ore, and fuel oil, [...] and of foodstuffs and gold, the latter from a mine about 80 miles from Taltal. Trains loaded with coal, fuel oil, and foodstuffs constitute the main traffic in the inland direction, and the chief commodities conveyed down to the port are nitrate, gold, and mineral ore. The company owns two moles at Taltal, from which the shipping capacity is 3,000 tons a day outwards, and 700 tons a day inwards. [...] The Taltal Railway has two tanks for the storage of fuel oil, which hold together 4,000 tons; it owns also a water pipe-line, 112 miles in length, leading from the foothills of the Andes down to the port."

More detailed information can be found in the books "The Taltal Railway" and "Kitson Meyer Articulated Locomotives", both by Donald Binns, which were my two principal sources. In general, very few technical information about the FCT locomotives can be traced. Despite searching for months, I wasn't able to find a detailed drawing. So I had to largely rely on taking measures from photos and on one single, distorted sketch on a data sheet describing the near-identical engines from the "Ferrocarril Tocopilla al Toco" - see below.
(While there are numerous photos of the sole surviving FCT Kitson-Meyer, no. 59, nearly all of them were taken during the engine's last years in service, when it was already in a very poor state of maintenance, or since it has been on display as a monument. Because of that, it's difficult to conclude how it looked in better days. Nevertheless, I hope - and believe - that the model's overall impression comes close enough to the real locomotive's appearance.)

The model is held in accurate 1/22.5 scale. It consists of quite exactly 3,000 parts and weighs in at 2.4 kg. The engine is powered by two L-motors (one mounted vertically in each bogie); each motor has its own BuWizz as a power supply and R/C unit (technically, one BuWizz would suffice, but this configuration allows for longer running times).
The wheels come from BBB and the lighting equipment was purchased from Brickstuff, as usual, while the rods are 3D-printed parts of my own design.

Enough said – enjoy the photos!

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Data sheet for the similar engines (though with different brake equipment and cab) of the "Ferrocarril Tocopilla al Toco":
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Detailed cab...
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... and also smokebox interior, showing the exhaust nozzle, the base of the chimney and the boiler tubes:
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The cab roof is detachable. The ventilation flap really opens, you can see the lever for the steam whistle through the hole:
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The top of the Belpaire firebox is also detachable, giving access to the charging sockets and the power buttons:
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The lower part of the cab ladder is attached to the bogie and turns with it. Note also the chain which prevents the bogie from jackknifing in case of a derailment.
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Advanced lighting functions, controlled via two BuWizz channels:

 

Before starting their daily trip into the Andes, engineer and fireman still have enough time to pose for a photo with their trusty old lady...
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... while one of the brakemen uses the unexpected spare time in a different way.
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Well, but not for long. Soon "El Jefe" arrives in his flashy Chevrolet and critically watches his employees' activities...

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A few shots from the building phase, showing further details.
First, the bogies with the motors. You can see the leaf springs underneath, as well as the brakes and (as on the real thing) only one single sanding pipe in front of the first wheel:

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The firebox once again:

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The main frame. The ashpan contains two weight bricks, which help to keep the centre of gravity low and thus to prevent the model from tipping over.

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And a view of the complete technical layout with batteries and motors. The multi-coloured bricks underneath are just the building stand.

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Full-resolution images can be found in my Bricksafe folder.
At the moment, it’s too hot in my attic for filming, and I’ll go on holiday next week; but when I’m back, of course I'll shoot a video of the locomotive and its train, so stay tuned!

Last but not least, I'd like to give my heartfelt thanks to all those AFOLs who attended the development of this model with their feedback and encouragement; and especially (though we've never met in person) to my dear "pen-friend" Sergio Monai @monai, whose multilingualism and commitment were an invaluable help during the research phase.

Comments and criticism are of course most welcome!

Thanks for stopping by!

Best regards,
Sven

Edited by Tenderlok

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One word - ASTONISHING.

It's a beauty, it is complex, it is an uncommon locomotive... fantastic.

Can't wait to see it working on your layout!!!

P.S.

The Chevy in the background looks great!!!

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Why is my favorite part the flickering oil lamp lmao? Seriously though great build all around. The detail you can add at this scale is remarkable.  I am in love with the firebox and the boiler tubes!  But all the little ladders and levers and the jack chains are great!

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First of all many thanks for thinking I was able to help you, but a thousand of thanks for this show of extreme LEGO ability in modelling such a masterpiece. With the risk of repeating myself you put the level of LEGO train (and not only) modelling to such an high level that perhaps could be even  discouraging for us, simply mortals.. :-) 

anyway, after the deserved compliments, I would pick you for even climb over your summit: after sound, smoke and fire lighting, "weathering", the final goal for a train model layout, is it a viable practice for LEGO? your magnificent loko is just as coming out from the factory, and I can assure you that in the Atacama region it would stands clean for no more than half an hour.

I wish you a wonderful (and cooler) holiday waiting for another great train adventure

sincerely

Sergio

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This is incredible! Wonderful engine! So many details...

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Posted (edited)

Wow very good use of new lego pieces!

I like the oil lamp and the firebox with those flickering lights :wub:

This kind of valves put backwards lacked in your collection ... excellent choice! :excited:

Top notch work ...as usual for your standard :thumbup:

Edited by LEGO Train 12 Volts

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Too big a scale for my taste but damn what a marvelous build...again :wub:

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The larger the scale, the more LEGO "pieces" CAN do it. Building 6 wide is - tough, as far as I am concerned. OK, 7 wide gives "some" flexibility, and X-wide even more. 

But: CAN, as in CAN. I have no idea, no clue, none-what-so-ever, how you accomplish the "CAN" part. This is breathtakingly nice.

Wonderful. Congratulations on this achievement!

All the best
Thorsten

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Posted (edited)

Thanks all for your kind words and appreciation!

17 hours ago, monai said:

"weathering", the final goal for a train model layout, is it a viable practice for LEGO? your magnificent loko is just as coming out from the factory, and I can assure you that in the Atacama region it would stands clean for no more than half an hour.

I know what you mean, and I also know there are fantasticly done examples of weathered large-scale locos. Unfortunately, my only argument is - I don't like that look...
Of course it's unrealistic to see a hard-working locomotive look that shiny and new (though, in the above-mentioned book about the FCT, there are photos from the early 20th century which show that - at least back then - the FCT engines were kept VERY clean.)
That being said, finally it's like Emanuele ( @LEGO Train 12 Volts ) stated some time ago for his collection: My little railway is an ideal one, where well-maintained, beautifully cleaned vehicles from all over the world live together in peace and harmony... :wink:

Edited by Tenderlok

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Tenderlok said:

That being said, finally it's like Emanuele ( @LEGO Train 12 Volts ) stated some time ago for his collection: My little railway is an ideal one, where well-maintained, beautifully cleaned vehicles from all over the world live together in peace and harmony... :wink:

I understand your thought, since a completely realistic layout is not your final goal, the shiny look is icing on the cake.

But the sense of being used is somehow charming me, is also for this (and wallet) reason that I prefer used bricks. As regard the photos of the early 20th century, let me say that probably the lokos were kept clean for the photographer (that time it wasn't so common take pictures), in that dusty countryside it should take more time to wash the engines than to drive them..:laugh:

Edited by monai

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30 minutes ago, monai said:

 in that dusty countryside it should take more time to wash the engines than to drive them..:laugh:

It's a common saying among museum railroaders round here that one hour of running requires two hours of repairing... Maybe that sentence actually originates from Chile... :wink:

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Posted (edited)

The highest level of modeling !!! Even additional photos of additional details can be viewed as a high art object. Of course, I cannot understand how everything is arranged there, but no one can take away feelings of joy for the appearance of such an accurate and beautiful model for public viewing !!!:classic:

Edited by Nemo57

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Thank you, @Nemo57 !

19 hours ago, Nemo57 said:

Of course, I cannot understand how everything is arranged there

If you'd like to know something specific, I'll be happy to answer your questions!

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Top notch work. So many details have been included. This stands out as a great example of what can be done with LEGO.

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Absolutely stunning work.  Your creations are such an inspiration.  I have been a lifelong collector of LGB trains in 1:22.5 scale, and being in the USA I have always had a fondness for European narrow gauge and similar prototypes, so your engine and coaches very much appeal to me.  I have thought more than once about buying the bricks needed to make one of your engines so I could run it with our annual Christmas layout (see here for a much earlier example).  Someday I may just do it-- it would be amazing to see such beautiful LEGO machines in motion.

Keep up the great work, and thank you again for sharing your amazing creations with the community!

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Thank you, @Feuer Zug and @Rob Klingberg !

10 hours ago, Rob Klingberg said:

I have thought more than once about buying the bricks needed to make one of your engines so I could run it with our annual Christmas layout (see here for a much earlier example).  Someday I may just do it-- it would be amazing to see such beautiful LEGO machines in motion.

I would absolutely love to see one of my engines running around your Christmas tree (btw - as a near-life-long Handel fan: great choice of music!). The only thing is - I fear you'd have to extend your "carpet layout"... my models require at least the LGB R3 radius (~1200 mm). :wink:

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Thanks again, @LEGO Train 12 Volts !

I have to say that the yellow lining is actually a thing which I'm pretty proud of (btw, it's in fact a 1x6 tile plus a 1x3 tile :wink: ). Here's a little lxf file to show how it's made and attached to the firebox.
I chose this arrangement because the prototype has a gently rounded "sill" below the cab windows, so I wanted at least a slightly stepped solution, with the yellow stripe offset inwards just a little bit, instead of a simple 90° corner.

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Great build again, tenderlok!

Have been taking a time off Eurobricks, and then this beauty comes along, in fact via the chevrolet car you built. Fantastic builds both of them.

I like the flickering light of the firebox and the rear lamp, nice details!

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A genuinely stunning model. I have recently rejuvenated my passion for Lego trains by getting my two sons involved. I dusted off my 1986 Xmas present - the 7745 high speed train. Since then I have dabbled with Hornby 00 gauge and most recently G scale. However, having recently been introduced to these splendid creations I think I have found my medium - Lego G scale! I am in your debt for your generous help with information on this model. It is literally awesome! 👍

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Thank you for your appreciation, @JP1976 !

17 hours ago, JP1976 said:

I dusted off my 1986 Xmas present - the 7745 high speed train.

Looking at your nickname, it seems that we share not only the year of birth, but also some childhood memories… though I think it was already a 1985 Christmas present for me. In '86 it was the 6392 airport, I believe. But it may also have been the other way round... :wink:
Unfortunately, I gave all my Lego away when I was 19 or so, and had to start from the beginning when I returned to the hobby in 2012…

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Yes that’s pretty much the same story, only returning to Lego with the kids growing up. I bought a whole heap of 12v off eBay and thoroughly enjoyed setting it all up. I then made the stupid decision of selling it all and moving onto the newer PF Stuff which isn’t as good in my opinion, but the kids like it. I’ll just satisfy myself with more “adult” models such as your creations!

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