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blackdeathgr

[OL - FB] Filles du Roi

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Posted (edited)

New Terra, the land of opportunities, yet the land of danger as well... This statement best describes the new lands that are being colonized as we speak. But it is a harsh place and not fit for everyone, let alone women. How can our settlements grow and flourish with so few women around though?? After a careful evaluation by the King's advisers and after a petition by no other than our gracious Queen Mother, poor girls from various parts of Oleon's rural areas and cities were bestowed a dowry and sent to our overseas colonies to get married, have children and educate the newly formed colonies...

47370164301_98f9dd59f5_z.jpg

After some usual wiki-browsing, I stumbled upon that article that however strange, is completely true :cry_happy: . You can read more here and here. My creation is a loose interpretation of a past era painting"A view of women coming to Quebec in 1667, in order to be married to the French Canadian farmers. Talon and Laval are waiting for the arrival of the women" (Watercolor by Eleanor Fortescue Brickdale, 1871-1945. Courtesy of Library and Archives Canada, Acc. no 1996-371-1)

Not much of a moc (rather a figbarfing) but I hope you like this free build. Oh, and it's sooo good to be back (even for a while) after all this absence of mine!

Edited by blackdeathgr

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Interesting topic. And while, as you admit, it's more figbarf than MOC, I always enjoy attempts at recreating paintings, and it's on topic for the period. I like it. :thumbup:

And thanks for sharing the links about the topic.

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Never heard the term “fig barf” :iamded_lol:

Honestly, I think I’m a huge fan, well laid out minifigures are fun and can be interesting. Thanks for sharing the story!

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You portayed this watercolor very well... which settlement are the women for ?

Is there some dirty money to made in a white slave trade business ? (for some nefarious pirates of course) :devil_laugh:

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Glad your back!  I actually like this because you tied it directly to history...  I actually never knew there was such a program...  Then again I know more about the Cajun French then I do the Canadian French lol

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Very neat how you have managed to recreate the painting. We want more :moar:

What a time to be alive for those girls though.. Poor girls having to marry to snobby Oleon aristocrats :dwacko:

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Posted (edited)
On 3/13/2019 at 9:31 PM, Capt Wolf said:

Interesting topic. And while, as you admit, it's more figbarf than MOC, I always enjoy attempts at recreating paintings, and it's on topic for the period. I like it. :thumbup:

And thanks for sharing the links about the topic.

Thanks Capt Wolf! I wanted to recreate that painting approximately a year ago but I guess now was the (free) time!

22 hours ago, TomSkippy said:

Never heard the term “fig barf” :iamded_lol:

Honestly, I think I’m a huge fan, well laid out minifigures are fun and can be interesting. Thanks for sharing the story!

Thanks Skippy and I am glad you liked it! I am a huge fan of figbarfings! Woof woof!  :tongue:

21 hours ago, Professor Thaum said:

You portayed this watercolor very well... which settlement are the women for ?

Is there some dirty money to made in a white slave trade business ? (for some nefarious pirates of course) :devil_laugh:

Thanks Professor! Naaah, the girls got their dowry and such. Moreover they chose who to marry and not the other way around :tongue: As to their destination, I guess everywhere but Breshaun (which already has the creme de la creme of the female colonist so far)

14 hours ago, Roadmonkeytj said:

Glad your back!  I actually like this because you tied it directly to history...  I actually never knew there was such a program...  Then again I know more about the Cajun French then I do the Canadian French lol

Thanks Roadmonkeytj! The interesting topics one can find while browsing at wikipedia while the weather is not suitable for strolling, are endless!

7 hours ago, Fraunces said:

Very neat how you have managed to recreate the painting. We want more :moar:

What a time to be alive for those girls though.. Poor girls having to marry to snobby Oleon aristocrats :dwacko:

Thanks Fraunces! Rest assure that those girls won't marry Oleander aristocrats (those already have their own harems). They are destined for your average, everyday colonist :wink:

Edited by blackdeathgr

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Oh ! Great representation of this part of our History !

I knew (being French myself) the French government sent out poor young gals to be married in Canada during this period but I didn't knew there were paintings describing this event...

Good job on the painting, it's very close to the original. :thumbup:

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On 3/15/2019 at 9:49 AM, Faladrin said:

Oh ! Great representation of this part of our History !

I knew (being French myself) the French government sent out poor young gals to be married in Canada during this period but I didn't knew there were paintings describing this event...

Good job on the painting, it's very close to the original. :thumbup:

Thanks Fal! I knew nothing about it (before reading about it of course) so I am sure you know more details on the subject than me :sweet:. The painting itself is made a bit later than the actual fact, but it surely portrays a strange moment of human history!

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