Videomajk

[MOC]: The Moon Rocket - from Tintin

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Hello
I want to share my first MOC in many, many years. After building the official Apollo V set I was inspired to start building again. My first idea was to accompany my Apollo V with my childhood favourite rocket, the moon rocket from Tintin’s “Destination Moon”. I searched and found a lot of MOC’s of this rocket, but all of the were either too big or in the wrong proportions to fit my needs, so I ended up designing my own MOC. So here I present “The Moon Rocket”. It’s a pure digital build this far. I hope you like it.


About the model
In 1950, when space travel and journeys to the moon where still science fiction, Belgian cartoonist Hergé (Georges Remi) published the serialised version of what would become the two album Tintin adventure “Destination Moon”. Hergé was known for his sense of detail and perfection and put huge amounts of research behind this album to make it as accurate as possible. The adventure tells the story of a maned mission to the moon, something that was yet to be achieved in the 50´s.
The vehicle that transported Tintin, Snowy, Captain Haddock and professor Calculus to the moon was a bright red painted, cigar shaped rocket with three large fins and a white checkered pattern around the mid-section. This rocket has become famous for its elegant design and is now synonymous with Tintin. The design is instantly recognised by millions of people which has read and loved the Adventures of Tintin over the decades.
This model is a tribute to that rocket. The model is designed at a scale of 1:110, to match the official Lego Apollo V rocket. But scale is tricky with an imaginary rocket. Even if Hergé included a detailed drawing in the albums and built several scale models during the work with the album to get the pictures as accurate as possible, there is no official record of how tall the rocket is. To get a plausible length, I started out with the drawing in the album and concluded that it was possible that the drawing was made at a 1:300 scale. In combination with information from the book "Spaceship Handbook" (Jack Hagerty and Jon C. Rogers) and measurements from the album art, I ended up with a total length of 66 meters, including the antenna. At 1:110 scale, this makes the rocket model 60 cm (23.62 inches) tall. The model is made up of 1.575 Lego bricks.

A display model
This model is meant to be a display model only. The different sections of the rocket are held together by very few Lego pieces. The model will most likely hold together when standing upright but will very likely break apart if tilted or held horizontally.

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Yes, that's instantly recognizable. Great job in getting the shape that well on this scale. :thumbup:

Time to read the moon albums of Tintin again.

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Great work capturing the elegant curves at the top of the original rocket :thumbup:

Thanks for the cutaway and insight into the design process. I find it interesting you set a scale first and built to that rather than choosing pieces that would give you the shape and then working out the scale after.

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Very nice recreation, lot of thought gone into the build clearly.

Have been hoping for a Tintin IDEAS set to make it for some time now.

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