Tenderlok

MOC: Just a humble 0-8-0T... (Flensburger Kreisbahn No. 1 in 1:22.5 scale)

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Posted (edited)

Dear train lovers,

It's time for another locomotive MOC!
As a tribute to my favourite holiday region (where in fact I am right now, writing this), I chose the Flensburger Kreisbahn's No. 1, a 0-8-0T narrow gauge locomotive, as a prototype.

The Flensburger Kreisbahn ("Flensburg county railway") was a 1000 mm gauge railway in Germany's extreme North, with two lines (94 km in total) running through the hills of Anglia close to the Danish border. When the railway's older, saturated-steam locomotives became too weak to handle increased train loads, two new superheated-steam engines were ordered from AEG in Berlin - yes, there was a time when AEG, famous for its electrical devices, also built steam locomotives! Delivered in 1926, these 0-8-0T engines, numbered 1 and 2, were an immediate success. With approx. 300 hp and a permitted speed of 40 km/h, they were suited for both freight and heavy passenger trains and remained in service until the railway's closure in 1953. Sadly, both locomotives were scrapped.

A substantial problem while designing the model was the almost complete lack of reliable sources. All technical information had to be derived from a short description, some b/w photos and a single small drawing in just one book (Schöning/Kupfer: Die Flensburger Kreisbahnen. Verlag Kenning, Nordhorn, 2004). Nevertheless, I'm confident that my model comes as close as possible to the real engines (footnote: Sadly, Mr Kenning didn't reply when I asked for permission to reproduce the above-mentioned drawing, so I can't show the usual comparison between model and prototype).

The MOC consists of approx. 2,200 parts and weighs just under 1.5 kg. It is held in accurate 1:22.5 scale, therefore compatible with conventional garden railway equipment (45 mm G-scale track), and can be coupled to rolling stock fitted out with LGB link-and-pin couplers.
My layout uses the LGB R3 radius (1195 mm), so the locomotive has to be able to negotiate these curves. However, as I wanted to avoid the use of blind drivers for aesthetical reasons, this required two little tricks: The last axle is slidable sideways by +/- 1/2 stud, and the second axle's wheels are slightly set inwards, resulting in an increased lateral track play. Although this arrangement causes some drag while negotiating curves, it nevertheless works.
The locomotive is driven by two L-motors. A BuWizz functions as both a battery pack and remote control receiver. The lighting equipment was bought from Brickstuff, while the wheels are BBB XL drivers, as usual.

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Purists may kindly ignore the two following scenes... :wink:
Of course, the engine crew was proud to pose for a souvenir photo.

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Even the local grocer came to have a look at the new locomotive.
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The engine frame:
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While my previous BDZ 606.76 had its focus on exploring the possible level of detailing for a LEGO model, this time the goal was to design a simple locomotive for uncomplicated operation. Above all, the new model had to overcome the 606.76's proneness to tipping over. Thus, the frame houses two weight bricks for improved traction and a lower centre of gravity (highlighted in blue):

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Some views of the brake rigging and the two large vacuum-brake cylinders:

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All drivetrain components, including the BuWizz, are tightly packed and positioned as low and as close to the engine's centre as possible, again with the aim of optimizing the COG:

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The power button and the charging socket are accessible by removing part of the boiler top:

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The cylinders, closed-type feedwater heater (system "Knorr"), and generator:

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The upper part of the cab. While looking quite simple, the task to model the roof's half-stud offset and the vent hole in the cab front almost drove me nuts... But I think I found a satisfying solution:

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Cab interior and lights:
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This time there was no space for magnetic switches to control the headlights; so the coal bunker contains two small separate battery packs (with built-in switches) for front and rear lights. The cab is illuminated, too, when any of the two circuits is turned on.
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Realistic Winterthur valve gear. The basic dimensions are the same as on my BDZ 606.76:

Originally, I had used zephyr1934's rods and valve gear parts again. But then I found them to be looking too massive , considering the rather delicate rods of the prototype. Besides, during the first functional testing sessions of the near-completed model, the flex elements which I originally used for the side rods proved too large by just a fraction of a millimetre - the cable connectors collided with the rear mounting of the crosshead guide, something which could not be foreseen in LDD. So I knuckled down to get used to Tinkercad and designed my own rods, including thinner, slightly tapezoidal main rods as well (both subsequently made by Shapeways).

And for the first time - SMOKE (using a Seuthe No. 99 smoke generator, powered by the BuWizz via a modified PF cable):

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I finished the model just in time before going on holiday, so I had no time to shoot a video on track. Of course, I'll do this when I'm back home again. In the meantime, your feedback, comments and criticism are most welcome!
As usual, high-resolution images can be found in my Bricksafe folder. If someone should be interested in the LDD file, please contact me by PM.

Thanks for stopping by!

Best regards,
Sven

Edit: Now with on-track video - see here!

Edited by Tenderlok

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Yet another thing of beauty! Like all of your locomotives, a fine work of art that looks like it belongs in an LGB catalog. I love that comment, "this time the goal was to design a simple locomotive for uncomplicated operation." I guess it is all relative, grin.

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Posted (edited)

Absolutely magnificent !

Edited by dtomsen

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Incredible work. Magnificent detail all around. Seriously, you build like the gold standard of schmallspurbahn dampfloks!

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Posted (edited)

Modesty, indeed, adorns this, of course, is a wonderful work of lego-modelism. The author approached the solution of this, in his opinion, simpledefault_default_laugh_new.gif problem in the corresponding for him very complex collection style.
You have a very elegant thing. Despite its size. Thank you for the brilliant performance and elegant presentation of the work, detailed and professional.

Edited by Nemo57

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Posted (edited)

Like a sentry on patrol I'm waiting impatiently for your works ...that's another great shot!  :moar:

I love the new livery in dark green (I've just finished some German and Saxons passenger wagon with the same color and they look fine) and the brake details!

You organize your locomotives as if everything were natural and simple without neglecting any detail ...just gorgeous! :wub:

The Walschaerts valve is perfect and the smoking feature is the icing on the cake! :wub_drool:

Well done my Lego friend! :thumbup:

Edited by LEGO Train 12 Volts

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Brilliant.

This really is scale-modeling, seen from afar it's hardly recognizable as Lego anymore.

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Many, many thanks to all of you for that enthusiastic feedback - and special thanks to @JopieK for being frontpaged!

1 hour ago, LEGO Train 12 Volts said:

I love the new livery in dark green (I've just finished some German and Saxons passenger wagon with the same color and they look fine) and the brake details!
[...]
Well done my Lego friend! :thumbup:

You're always so kind! :blush:
I also like the dark green livery very much, it looks kind of noble. But the limited parts availability in that colour made the design process quite difficult sometimes... and the building more expensive than any other of my models... :sceptic:

Now I'm waiting to see your dark green wagons!

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Posted (edited)

I wanted to build a BR 01. But after your post I do not dare anymore. :'(

It is so stunning. Even people who laughed at me because I have LEGO said that they couldn't believe that something like this can be build in LEGO. Heres the prove.

 

I have a question tough.

The stickers with the golden Font and the transparent stickers with the white font. How did do produce them? At home with your printer or ordered them by a company which makes custom stickers?

Edited by Robin_IV

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Beautyfull model. Great details and one i would like to build. Also a scale model forum item if you ask me. 

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This is incredible!  What a beautiful engine.  I'm amazed at this build.  The design in LEGO is truly splendid. 

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There are some really nice details on the train! But personally the tires look a little weird as boilers.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks again for your feedback!

6 hours ago, Robin_IV said:

The stickers with the golden Font and the transparent stickers with the white font. How did do produce them? At home with your printer or ordered them by a company which makes custom stickers?

The goldern stickers are printed on golden, self-adhesive polyester foil with my inkjet printer, then sealed with clear adhesive tape (the print is not 100% smear-proof), cut out with a scalpel and applied.
For the transparent ones, I used a Dymo label printer with white-on-transparent label tapes.

@JarJarBonks: Tires are the only parts with the right diameter. Of course it would be better to use a "slick" version, but it doesn't exist.

Edited by Tenderlok

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Incredible amount of detail!

I'm always happy when I find a new posting of your wonderful train models.

Einfach großartig!

 

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Wow, Sven.

There is nothing much to add to what others have already said - simply a most beautiful steam engine, realized unbelievably skillfull with regard to building techniques, and particularly in this model with regard to sturdiness. But most importantly to me is the love and passion you put into replicating a steam engine working in a region so remote and lovely. I happen to know how it is up there - was born in Schleswig and lived for 20 Years in Jübek. Flensburg is just 30 km away. My grandpa and two of my uncles worked for the Schleswiger Kreisbahn - I was 6 years old, when I was repeatedly watching an even smaller steamer working the way up the final "hill" from Kappeln into Schleswig - Kreisbahnhof - and the way back..

It all fits so well: Your detailing, your passion of making an mostly entirely unknown AEG engine a perfect replica - and knowing that Northern Germany was simply made for it. OK, maybe it was the other was around, but that does not change a bit. Thank you so much for sharing!

All the very best,
Thorsten        

 

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Dear Sven

using a famous Lego slogan "EVERYTHING (IN YOUR MODEL) IS AWESOME", really you are putting the level of lego modeling to another class. It is time to speak over the Lego horizon (also because you have cross the border of lego purism), you are definitely the AsterHobbies, Fulgurex, Lemaco, Micro-metakit of brick trains.

Above your skill is, as I know well, your railway culture that allows you to explore the forgotten railways and bring to our attention this small gems.

One question: can you explain us how have you coupled the slidable axle with the rod (I need it for the project you know :-))?

with my best compliments

Sergio

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Thanks a lot for your appreciation, yanwilma, Asper, Toastie and monai!

@Toastie Thorsten, your words mean a lot to me, especially considering what you said about your personal background. I know today's remnants of the Schleswiger Kreisbahn fairly well, as I am a regular visitor of the "Angelner Dampfeisenbahn" museum railway on the Kappeln-Süderbrarup line, which of course formerly was part of Kappeln-Schleswig.
Slightly off-topic, but do you know that there's an excellent new book about the Schleswiger Kreisbahn? Highly recommended!

@monai Sergio, my friend, thanks for your words. I hope you know that our correspondence is a permanent source of inspiration for me.
Regarding your technical question, it's actually very simple: The side rod is attached to the wheels by no. 3673 Technic pins; so with the rod being just under half a stud thick, it can "float" on the free end of the pin (1 stud wide) while the axle shifts.

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Just spotted this on the homepage. Wow!

 "A humble 0-8-0T"... This is anything but "humble", it's absolutely incredible. :wub: The amount of detail you've included is breathtaking. As well as all the exterior details, I really love the cab interior. An amazing, brilliant MOC. :classic: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:

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