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20 minutes ago, Thedarkmaster2 said:

The Fold said on their twitter that they're writing music for the next season. 

Huh, didn't know that. I am glad they are back then!

20 minutes ago, Thedarkmaster2 said:

Why would he have an eye patch then?

3.jpg

I really don't know...

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I know it's a bit old now, but just a heads up that Amazon Canada has the Ninjago City Docks on sale for 20% off. I just picked up my copy and can't wait to build it.
:drool:

 

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On 5/23/2019 at 9:08 AM, Lego David said:

I really don't know...

Ah okay now I see that picture,

maybe might want to post that next time

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On 5/23/2019 at 4:08 PM, Lego David said:

 

I really don't know...

The usage of eyepatches in popular culture is nothing but a huge misconception. There were and there still are many reasons to use one, most of which do not include to cover up an eye lost in battle.
I use eyepatches regularly to rest my eye - there are better ways but for my condition it is still quite comfortable solution. Most people with similar condition I've met prefer to be asked a few times why they look so strange; while I get asked hundreds of times if I lost my eye. Most people that did loose their eye though wear artificial ones. Even though they are purely aesthetic, other than some squinting u won't notice all that much.

To talk a bit more about Ninjago: Im a bit dissapointed by Lloyds mech. it looks really amazing but again they missed a good chance to include knee joints. Would have been easy on this one; like Kay's mech.
And I think it will be hard to cover up the open "cockpit".

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11 minutes ago, Kim-Kwang-Seok said:

To talk a bit more about Ninjago: Im a bit dissapointed by Lloyds mech. it looks really amazing but again they missed a good chance to include knee joints. Would have been easy on this one; like Kay's mech.

Yeah for some reason Lego is Kneephobic when it comes to mechs. And to build on what you said about eyepatches. Most people think they're for people who lose an eye (Which is a perfectly cool thing to do) Most people do it to rest their eyes.

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5 hours ago, Thedarkmaster2 said:

Yeah for some reason Lego is Kneephobic when it comes to mechs. And to build on what you said about eyepatches. Most people think they're for people who lose an eye (Which is a perfectly cool thing to do) Most people do it to rest their eyes.

The reason is that, especially for bigger mechs like this one, it's very hard to have a knee that's both tight enough to support the weight of a large mech and loose enough that you can bend it without the force you use to try and bend it instead breaking another part of the model. As a Bionicle builder I'm quite familiar with the challenges of doing so even with a system explicitly designed for it—and even if you can get it to work for the purposes of an articulated display model, posing might still end up requiring more finagling than is convenient for play.

Honestly I'm quite impressed with these legs for what they are—they look as sturdy as those of the similarly-sized Fire Mech while having much more streamlined and naturalistic shaping and posture.

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I'm okay with it not having knees. My Exo-Force click hinges strip out occasionally, leaving the click-stops loose, and I can't count how many LEGO ball-socket joints have broken around my house.

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11 hours ago, Kim-Kwang-Seok said:

To talk a bit more about Ninjago: Im a bit dissapointed by Lloyds mech. it looks really amazing but again they missed a good chance to include knee joints. Would have been easy on this one; like Kay's mech.

I too am disappointed about that... I mean,i just don't understand why they don't st least try to include knees in their new mechs... 

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On 5/23/2019 at 10:08 PM, Lego David said:

I really don't know...

I do recall in the Lego Atlantis movie, Captain Ace Speedman wears an eyepatch even though he didn't lose an eye. He just said that it looked cool on him.

On a side note, I'm quite excited that Clutch Powers is returning! It's been so long! Here's to hoping the same voice actor returning too if possible!

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12 hours ago, Lyichir said:

The reason is that, especially for bigger mechs like this one, it's very hard to have a knee that's both tight enough to support the weight of a large mech and loose enough that you can bend it without the force you use to try and bend it instead breaking another part of the model. As a Bionicle builder I'm quite familiar with the challenges of doing so even with a system explicitly designed for it—and even if you can get it to work for the purposes of an articulated display model, posing might still end up requiring more finagling than is convenient for play.

I mean i Understand but they apply this lack of knes even to smaller mechs, what's the deal with that? The New Samurai Mech from Legacy, could handle knees. Heck even the Samurai X2 probably could/ There is no excuse for mechs of those size. And to go beyond Ninjago just for one last example. The Grimrocks from Nexo Knights lacked knees

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, Thedarkmaster2 said:

I mean i Understand but they apply this lack of knes even to smaller mechs, what's the deal with that? The New Samurai Mech from Legacy, could handle knees. Heck even the Samurai X2 probably could/ There is no excuse for mechs of those size. And to go beyond Ninjago just for one last example. The Grimrocks from Nexo Knights lacked knees

I agree. I really don't see why they are doing this. What is so hard about giving a little mech knees?

 

3 hours ago, JJ Tong (zfogshooterz) said:

On a side note, I'm quite excited that Clutch Powers is returning! It's been so long! Here's to hoping the same voice actor returning too if possible!

I really doubt that would be the case. I mean, I don't see why they would do so.

Edited by Lego David

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7 hours ago, Lego David said:

I too am disappointed about that... I mean,i just don't understand why they don't st least try to include knees in their new mechs... 

 

4 minutes ago, Thedarkmaster2 said:

I mean i Understand but they apply this lack of knes even to smaller mechs, what's the deal with that? The New Samurai Mech from Legacy, could handle knees. Heck even the Samurai X2 probably could/ There is no excuse for mechs of those size. And to go beyond Ninjago just for one last example. The Grimrocks from Nexo Knights lacked knees

Here is a short thread on why, straight from one of the Lego designers.

 

On the topic of LLoyds Mech, I personally won't be buying it regardless of how good it is aesthetically due to its size. I've already had to replace the joints on my Fire Mech and Garma Mecha Man sets multiple times already as they just became too loose. Another problem I have with large mechs are their lack of posability which is probably the most important aspect of a mech or figure.

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15 minutes ago, JasonEffex said:

Here is a short thread on why, straight from one of the Lego designers.

I thought Lego was all about attempting the hard

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51 minutes ago, JasonEffex said:

Here is a short thread on why, straight from one of the Lego designers.

The reason said there doesn't really convince me... :sceptic:

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10 hours ago, Thedarkmaster2 said:

I thought Lego was all about attempting the hard

Why?

Lego is about creativity and fun. But if Lego's testing with kids shows that they have less fun or satisfaction from a mech with knees than from one without them, then it's pretty clear to them which they should opt for. There are definitely ways to add greater articulation to models but those generally come with sacrifices—sacrifices in stability, in form, or in the building or play experience. Ultimately no perfect solution exists because different people are going to want different things out of a set, and all Lego can do is try to prioritize one type of experience—in most cases, the experience of the younger or more novice builders who make up the greater part of most sets' audiences.

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2 hours ago, Lyichir said:

all Lego can do is try to prioritize one type of experience—in most cases, the experience of the younger or more novice builders who make up the greater part of most sets' audiences.

I understand but like can you apply the weight argument to smaller, lighter mechs and creatures? And if any toy company could overcome these problems it would be Lego

12 hours ago, Lego David said:

The reason said there doesn't really convince me... :sceptic:

It only convinces me if it's for the largest of Mechs

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Thedarkmaster2 said:

I understand but like can you apply the weight argument to smaller, lighter mechs and creatures? And if any toy company could overcome these problems it would be Lego

It only convinces me if it's for the largest of Mechs

I agree. Larger mechs may be less stable if they have knees, but I don't really understand why that is the case with the small ones.

Kids have less enjoyment from mechs with more articulation and possibility? It's kinda hard for me to believe...

Edited by Lego David

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2 hours ago, Lego David said:

I agree. Larger mechs may be less stable if they have knees, but I don't really understand why that is the case with the small ones.

Kids have less enjoyment from mechs with more articulation and possibility? It's kinda hard for me to believe...

Sad for us, but better believe it. They are kids toys after all and Ninjago targets even younger audiences, then probably many other themes.

What I don't understand though is why TLG doesnt bring out new, specialized pieces for bigger mechs. People described the problems above - I have them as well; with all my bigger dragons and mechs, the joints cannt carry the weight after some time. My firstbourne dragon now cannt even stand on its own. So if stability is so important - why doesn't TLG bring out new, stronger pieces for these big mechs? Maybe pieces that are not colour fixed as well and have more aesthetic potential. Other knockoff-brands do it as well.

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im wondering in the forsaken emperor set how big is the dragon compared to other ninjago dragons im hoping its around the same size as the firstbourne dragon

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56 minutes ago, Kim-Kwang-Seok said:

Sad for us, but better believe it. They are kids toys after all and Ninjago targets even younger audiences,

These toys are not meant for toddlers, kids are the youngest audience. There' no reason for the lack of knees on smaller mechs or creatures, I'm sorry

15 minutes ago, TheGlynreaper said:

im wondering in the forsaken emperor set how big is the dragon compared to other ninjago dragons im hoping its around the same size as the firstbourne dragon

I would look at the size of the dragon in that hunted set where it came with an arena. it's probably around that size

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Posted (edited)

I can understand the lack of knees on heavier mechs, as even ratchet ball joints eventually might warp under the weight/temperature shifts.

Maybe not as bad as smooth ball joints, but even on those the performance varies on a per part and per use basis.

Of course it's still LEGO and able to be modded.

Edited by TeriXeri

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2 hours ago, Thedarkmaster2 said:

These toys are not meant for toddlers, kids are the youngest audience. There' no reason for the lack of knees on smaller mechs or creatures, I'm sorry

I would look at the size of the dragon in that hunted set where it came with an arena. it's probably around that size

If you’re talking about the earth dragon it’s definitely much bigger than that, I’d guess more around fusion dragon size 

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Posted (edited)
On 5/25/2019 at 7:29 PM, Lego David said:

I really doubt that would be the case. I mean, I don't see why they would do so.

Well, yeah, on the other hand it does seem like a stretch. I would be quite stoked if that's actually the case but it's not really a biggie to me if it isn't.

Edited by JJ Tong (zfogshooterz)

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15 hours ago, Thedarkmaster2 said:

I understand but like can you apply the weight argument to smaller, lighter mechs and creatures? And if any toy company could overcome these problems it would be Lego

Repeat after me: Lego is not omnipotent. In fact, the nature of Lego as a building toy is a key part of why these challenges exist—because its individual components are designed to be broken down and rebuilt, there's a certain inherent fragility that needs to be overcome that you might not see in a pre-assembled action figure or even a single purpose model kit. Making the joints rigid and stable requires a tighter connection, while making them come apart requires a looser one. You can get around this a bit with geometric locking techniques using Technic and System, but those are often bulky by necessity and can compromise the form factor the designers intend. The most rigid solution that still allows for "articulation" of a sort is a gear-based solution using worm gears, which I've often seen used for the very largest mech MOCs, but not only is that also bulky, but it is grossly impractical for play since it forces you to turn a gear by hand to adjust a single point of articulation. Pretty much all joints short of that have a little bit of "wiggle" to allow kids to pose them easily, which when compounded with the "wiggle" in the joints in the feet and hips can be enough to compromise stability, especially over time as joints wear in. Even without knee joints, this can lead a larger mech set to be less stable over time.

As for your question about smaller mechs, as the link above indicated it's not just about weight but also about the play experience. As a long-time Bionicle fan, I've seen how much trouble some younger fans have with the concept of knees—extending them to their full height on a figure that's meant to hunch over, overextending them, etc. Unintended poses like this can weaken a fan's impression of the finished product in some cases. And when posing a figure to stand up, knees can make it take longer to achieve the desired balance and pose, since you're adding another two points of articulation that need to be adjusted between each pose (even more on a multi-legged figure, which if you're curious is why many Bionicle "spider" sets either have limited articulation in some legs and/or fewer than eight legs).

Without knees, there are only two points of articulation to worry about on each leg—the hips (which primarily define the pose) and the feet (which often adjust automatically if positioning them with both feet on the ground). The "knees" can be locked into a good-looking, stable position for the figure in question, whether that is extended to full height, bent into an angle that enables low to the ground poses, or, in the case of this Titan Mech, locked at a slight angle that creates a dynamic, ready-for-action look while still allowing for an impressive height.

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