BrickMonkeyMOCs

[MOC] H.R. Giger's Landscape XIX

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I've been a huge Giger fan for a very long time and have always wanted to make a Lego version of one of his artworks. When he passed away in 2014 I thought of recreating his Landscape XIX painting, which I'd had as a poster in my workspace for some time, but I didn't really have the time then to do it justice. While many builders have done a fantastic job of translating Giger's work into Lego form - see my gallery of other builders' Giger creations here, including such epic builds as Grantmasters' Birth Machine, the Arvo Brothers' Xenomorph, and Bryce McGlone's Li II - I haven't yet seen anyone try this particular painting, which is odd as it seems particularly well-suited to being rendered in bricks. Anyway, after three weeks of designing, over a month of waiting for parts, and then three days of construction, here is my completed Lego version. It contains 3,835 pieces and measures 53 x 37 x 5cm.

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Edited by BrickMonkeyMOCs

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That's really cool. Especially the second picture where you can see the depth of the build. Well done!:classic:

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On 4/2/2018 at 9:08 PM, Littleworlds said:

That's really cool. Especially the second picture where you can see the depth of the build. Well done!:classic:

 

On 4/2/2018 at 9:46 PM, Shiva said:

Whoaaaa.

Thumbs up to that build!

 

On 4/3/2018 at 2:23 PM, beverly888 said:

Amazing.  Takes me to a whole other LEGO place seeing this work.  Thanks.

Thanks for your replies! The whole model is very sturdy, as the 600-piece frame is studs forwards (i.e. towards the viewer) with carefully placed studs on the inside edges connecting to a studs-up rear wall that the interior main build is connected to. The skulls are quite complex, with studs in multiple directions and the central nose section unconnected but secured in place by surrounding parts. The most difficult part was fitting the two half-skulls flush to the frame, which required a technic axle assembly partially extending into hollows in the frame supporting half-stud width dark grey lift-arms to match the curvature of the skull.

A hidden Easter egg here is the teddy bear inside the cylinder above the central skull, which can be revealed by replacing this half-cylinder cover with an equivalent trans-light-blue part. So the central figure is basically having teddy bear dreams fed directly into his brain.

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