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It's been a while since I've built a tank model. This time I wanted it to look accurate and perform well. You'll be the judges of looks, but I dare to assume that ability to cross 22 cm wide trenches, climb 9 cm tall vertical obstacles and ascend a 31° slope counts as decent performance. Not to mention that the hull is built partially upside-down, and includes partial interior based on that of the original tank.

 

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Phenomenal build and side-splitting video. You always manage to outdo yourself - your models get better and better (and I can't recall anything of yours being less than outstanding) as do your clips, both in the editing and in how thoroughly engaging they are. Hats off to you, sir.

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/\ This. Not sure what is more awesome: the build or the video. "He wanted to be a painter...." :laugh:.

How it compares with real one in terms of offroad performance, for example max slope? I presume the model has much better power/weight ratio?

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I was unable to find out the maximum slope possible to climb by the original Mark V. Finding any documentation for a vehicle from 100 years ago is, well, not easy.

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10 hours ago, Sariel said:

I was unable to find out the maximum slope possible to climb by the original Mark V. Finding any documentation for a vehicle from 100 years ago is, well, not easy.

Excellent build of the Mark V tank.
There were two types Male as per your model and Females which only had machine guns.

The Bovington Tank Museum in Dorset, England may be able to answer your query re max. climbing angle.
The museum has a huge collection of tanks - some in working order and used in displays.

http://www.tankmuseum.org

Edited by Doug72

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The Bovington Museum has one male Mark V, exactly the H41 unit from which I've taken the markings for my model, and it's not in the working order anymore.

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15 hours ago, Sariel said:

I was unable to find out the maximum slope possible to climb by the original Mark V. Finding any documentation for a vehicle from 100 years ago is, well, not easy.

I found specs for the Mark VIII from R.P. Hunnicuitt's "Firepower" that that vehicle could climb an 84% grade. Maybe similar specs would hold true for the mark V, though the Mark VIII has a more powerful V12 engine.

Great work on this model, I really like the SNOT work on the sides and the interior makes a good addition for detail. The traverse mechanisms for the sponson guns is a rather creative solution as well. I guess finding the balance between detail and functionality is always a compromise in most cases, though I think this model did an amazing job at obtaining both. I think it is also interesting to compare your first Mark I to this Mark V, and you can see how far you have changed in building style and attention to detail. :thumbup: 

Edited by Tommy Styrvoky

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This is a great build, Sariel. I particularly like the gun movement mechanism, which is smoother than butter and still very fast. It also doesn't have the jerky motion often seen when linear actuators reach the end of their travel. The video is very good, too. 

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