Richard Dower

What would a (S) Small PF motor look like?

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Any ideas or renders what what a Small Power Functions motor would/could look like?

Where could you mount it, how much power would/should it have etc?....the M motor is pretty small, so it would be interesting to see ideas for a future S motor.

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Probably like this:

S-motor.jpg

Which came from this topic (which you might want to have a look at).

 

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I see the need for this type of motor in many builds, but even more I'd like to see a way smaller servo motor. Servo can be used to control little movements like doors, trunks etc, but the servo motors makes the design of these parts very complicated, as every attempt to make everything compact is ruined by the size of the motor. Servo operations sometimes don't need to much torque, so a smaller motor would surely help.

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I'd want to see it in a 2x2 (width, height) form factor, but that makes it very hard to provide BI points for pins, eh?  Length, no specific preference.

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Posted (edited)

A 3x3 servo-like motor for controling valves, moving gearboxes, etc would be awesome. But unlike a true servo, I think having no feedback mechanism and just a simple coil with a magnet to turn the axle 90 degrees each direction would be much simpler and cheaper.

Edited by Zero (Zblj)

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16 minutes ago, Zero (Zblj) said:

But unlike a true servo, I think having no feedback mechanism and just a simple coil with a magnet to turn the axle 90 degrees each direction would be much simpler and cheaper.

That is an excellent idea!

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The length of the motor is dictated by few factors

1. Length of windings - Need a given length of wire (along axis) to generate enough electromagnetic force i.e. torque

2. Thickness of dual stage planetary gear train reductions. Teeth need to be long/wide enough to sustain torque from motor

In the old Micro-Motor, #2 was reduced to a minimum by the use of a 'harmonic drive'.

The small size of the micro-motor was likely the reason for its low reliability. Though, with small motors nowadays very pervasive (in small electronics). I'm sure we can build small motors that should be more durable than their larger siblings. Yes, TLG should be able to offer us new/revised/robust micro-motors.

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I think it would be quite cool if the future small motor was the same diameter as a large linear actuator, with a connection by axle pins onto the accuator mounting point.  so it could be used at the end of a boom to drive an actuator.

I'm sure I saw a mock up of this idea in the past.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, DrJB said:

The length of the motor is dictated by few factors

1. Length of windings - Need a given length of wire (along axis) to generate enough electromagnetic force i.e. torque

2. Thickness of dual stage planetary gear train reductions. Teeth need to be long/wide enough to sustain torque from motor

In the old Micro-Motor, #2 was reduced to a minimum by the use of a 'harmonic-like' single stage planetary drive. 

The small size of the micro-motor was likely the reason for its low reliability. Though, with small motors nowadays very pervasive (in small electronics). I'm sure we can build small motors that should be more durable than their larger siblings. Yes, TLG should be able to offer us new/revised/robust micro-motors.

Not sure what happened here ... I tried to correct my earlier post and ended up quoting myself. Quit self-centered if you ask me. :)

Edited by DrJB

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Posted (edited)

Did I miss any news about possible adjunction, or is it just a discussion? :classic:

I'd love compact S-motors that could be used for some functions that didn't require large and strong motors, when even M-motor is extra. I didn't face this picture with 3x3x3 XS-motor posted by mocbuild101 before, so I had some other ideas:

  • S-motor. 3 or 4 studs length hull that could fit some small motor possibly with a reducer. It's about the same that this "XS-motor" idea.
  • XS-motor. 2 studs length: one for mounting dark bluish gray drum and one for a micromotor - with no any reducer. A kind of "flat / short motor" that cold be easily attached directly to the necessary assembly. Exactly like paul_delahaye said.
Edited by Void_S
typo...

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8 minutes ago, paul_delahaye said:

I think it would be quite cool if the future small motor was the same diameter as a large linear actuator, with a connection by axle pins onto the accuator mounting point.  so it could be used at the end of a boom to drive an actuator.

+1. And even better if also possible to fit directly on a mLA. The torque needs to be just enough to activate the internal clutch of the large LA, with a suitable RPM to fully extend in a few seconds.

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3 hours ago, paul_delahaye said:

I think it would be quite cool if the future small motor was the same diameter as a large linear actuator, with a connection by axle pins onto the accuator mounting point.  so it could be used at the end of a boom to drive an actuator.

I tried to plan this out once, a motor that would fit into the bracket part of 61904 with a couple of pins. My idea was that the motor housing would have 4 1/2-deep pinholes so that standard 1/2 pins could be pushed through from the outside of the bracket into the motor housing. However, practically no space was left inside for the motor, so it would have to be at least 4 studs long to get a decent motor in the space, which turns out to be quite small.

 

2 hours ago, Void_S said:

Did I miss any news about possible adjunction, or is it just a discussion? :classic:

Unfortunately, just a discussion at present.

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