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Scale Modeling Building Help

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Here's a topic for asking questions about building scale models.

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Just now, M_longer said:

Blueprints, ruler and calculator.

I also use this. :thumbup:

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Technical data sheets and a calculator. And most important, the zoom on microsoft picture organizer to fit the image to the chosen tires.

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25 minutes ago, Milan said:

I also use this. :thumbup:

Lately I am also using quick sketches from Ldraw to match the size of the model with blueprint:

912wymiary.png

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2 hours ago, M_longer said:

Lately I am also using quick sketches from Ldraw to match the size of the model with blueprint:

 

So there's an import photo option for ldraw programs? otherwise I have used Gimp with and exported the parts for scaling from Ldview in png format. Also This works great with Blender, as you can use images as backgrounds in the program with the model for real time viewing, as this is useful for 3d modeling stuff in the program from blueprints. 

Also another good reference is a scale model, I use those a lot for my more recent models, plus I get to build two models at once.

Edited by Tommy Styrvoky

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13 hours ago, Tommy Styrvoky said:

So there's an import photo option for ldraw programs?

FROM LDraw, not IN LDraw :)

It is just a .png file added to bluperint in graphics software.

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Here's how I do.

I build in 1 : 15 scale. With a little help of google I can find the actual dimensions of the object I am building (car, tractor, truck etc.). Each LEGO unit (stud) is 8 mm wide / long. So - use this formula:
<actual object dimension in milimeters> / 15 / 8 = <MOC length in studs>
It is rarely an even number, so decide - which way you're goind to round it, or not. Since there are half-stud offsets and you can also build sideways... you can get prity close to the actual measurement.
Next.. find a bueprint of your desired object (side, front, rear, top). I import this picture in CorelDraw and apply a prepared lego-grid, but you can of course use whatever software you feel to fit. Each cell of my lego-grid is one plate long and one plate high. Count the calculated <MOC length in studs> and manually shrink or enlarge the blueprint picture to fit exactly the calculation. I normally do this with side view as that normally is the greatest dimension. Since car blueprints usually come with all four views in one scale, then all you have to do is to scale just one of the views to the lego-grid. All the remaining views will be to the desired scale automatically. Apply the lego-grid there too and you have the width, high and length in lego units there too.

I'm sure this is not a rocket science for the members in this forum. But I just felt like writing the stuff down :)

Cheers

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When making vehicles the Lego wheel diameter compared to the original is in most cases the scale definer. That results commenly in scales from 1:22 to 1:8,5 (I am building on this scale now)

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On 4/10/2017 at 9:26 PM, efferman said:

Technical data sheets and a calculator. And most important, the zoom on microsoft picture organizer to fit the image to the chosen tires.

That is the best philosophy when building models (I always start from tires) :thumbup:

On 7/7/2017 at 0:38 PM, Rolic said:

Here's how I do.

I build in 1 : 15 scale. With a little help of google I can find the actual dimensions of the object I am building (car, tractor, truck etc.). Each LEGO unit (stud) is 8 mm wide / long. So - use this formula:
<actual object dimension in milimeters> / 15 / 8 = <MOC length in studs>
It is rarely an even number, so decide - which way you're goind to round it, or not. Since there are half-stud offsets and you can also build sideways... you can get prity close to the actual measurement.
Next.. find a bueprint of your desired object (side, front, rear, top). I import this picture in CorelDraw and apply a prepared lego-grid, but you can of course use whatever software you feel to fit. Each cell of my lego-grid is one plate long and one plate high. Count the calculated <MOC length in studs> and manually shrink or enlarge the blueprint picture to fit exactly the calculation. I normally do this with side view as that normally is the greatest dimension. Since car blueprints usually come with all four views in one scale, then all you have to do is to scale just one of the views to the lego-grid. All the remaining views will be to the desired scale automatically. Apply the lego-grid there too and you have the width, high and length in lego units there too.

I'm sure this is not a rocket science for the members in this forum. But I just felt like writing the stuff down :)

Cheers

Actualy (if I remember correctly) user @DLuders ( David Luders) once mentioned that LEGO unit is 7.9375mm so you are defenetly correct when speaking about rounded numbers 

Regards

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What is the best way to find bleu prints on google? If you use  lets day ( ...car blue print ) you get a lot of pictures of that car, but no blue print. How do you guys search for them?

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For the build I want to do next, I will be taking measurements of the actual machine. I can not find blueprints, so I will get a tough idea for scaling it down with my tape measure. 

Also, quick question. Do you guys base your scale on tires? Or something else? I would guess tired only because they are a fixed size and you can work with that scaled version of tire. That was my thought for my next build. 

 

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On a wheeled vehicle the tires are the only point to choose the scale if you want to be purist. The relation between Vehicle size and Tire size is to important to ignore it.

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On 29-7-2017 at 7:07 AM, efferman said:

On a wheeled vehicle the tires are the only point to choose the scale if you want to be purist. The relation between Vehicle size and Tire size is to important to ignore it.

Amen to that

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On the other hand. Sheepo's Mustang is a very nice scale Technica Supercar despite the wheels being much too small.

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There are quite a lot of wheel sizes so in Technic the fake engine size is important too. Also some parts (for example wheel arches) may not be available for a certain scale. So there are a lot of things to consider and I always start with sketch versions in digital form with wheels, fake eingine, some characteristic body panels, etc hovering in the space before finalizing the scale and jumping into the design.

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I have a question about rigid tubing, I recently got a bunch of longer pieces of rigid tubing, and they were all bent, any good methods to fully straighten out the tubing.  

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I want to build the ship on which I sail. Obviously I have all the plans for the scaling. Is there anybody that can guide me in finding the sizes of all the LEGO bricks and items? I would like to build it in a scale that I can use the figures.

Thanks in advance!

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I think I may have a different perspective than most of you. I chose to build cars at 1/22 many years ago and that was determined mainly by the size of the tyres that I had at the time. However, ever since, most of my cars have been at that scale irrespective of the wheels. Why? Because I like all of them to fit together. I'd rather compromise a bit on the wheel size than on the relative sizes of the vehicles.

 

 

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