Tenderlok

MOC: 1/33 Swedish 0-8-2T with three (!) working cylinders

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Very nice train and execution. In addition to being a fantastic moc, your presentation is superb. I too drool over my keyboard(s).

Thanks for sharing!

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Thanks a lot, baard !

By the way: Of course, every locomotive needs a train to pull… :wink: Matching waggons for the M3a are under construction and should be ready by mid-October (though gathering certain parts proves to be a bit difficult). Stay tuned!

Edited by Tenderlok
restored emoticon

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Hi,

I'm really impressed! Such an awesome MOC!!  :thumbup:

Your other locomotives are also excellent!

Greetings,

Ben (new on eurobricks, I will introduce myself later on)

 

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On 7/23/2016 at 0:03 PM, Tenderlok said:

Dear fellow AFOLs,

(edit: shortened by me)

Best wishes,
Sven

Wow, I never go to train section. Big mistake. I have to start checking this section often. 

This is beautiful! 

:wub:

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On 6.10.2016 at 6:39 PM, BR-44-Fan said:

[...] I'm really impressed! Such an awesome MOC!!  :thumbup: [...]

Ben (new on eurobricks, I will introduce myself later on)

 

On 18.10.2016 at 2:29 PM, J_C said:

Wow, I never go to train section. Big mistake. I have to start checking this section often. 

This is beautiful! 

:wub:

Thank you very much!

Good to know we've acquired two more train lovers... :wink:

And welcome to EB, Ben! I'd love to see more details of that BR 44 in your avatar!

Edited by Tenderlok
restored emoticon

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Hello everyone,

sorry for bumping, but I think I’ve got a fair reason… :wink:
Finally, I managed to make a video of my M3a pulling her Scandinavian museum train (for the wagons, see here and here) – I hope you’ll enjoy it (please click on the picture for watching the video):

Zug.jpg

During pre-Christmas season, JMJ museum railway is operating excursion trains to the local Christmas market. In order to cope with the crowds of tourists from all over the world, JMJ had to borrow some additional carriages, but of course, the stout old lady can handle the longer train as well (click on picture again):

Lastprobefahrt.jpg

A word on the locomotive’s speed: With the two-wagon train, the engine is able to run at approx. 0.5 m/s, which in 1/33 scale is equivalent to 60 km/h in reality. Pulling the heavier train from the second video, it still reaches 0.42 m/s or 50 km/h. I wasn’t able to find out about the prototype’s maximum permitted speed; however, similar Swedish engine classes were allowed to run at 55-60 km/h, so I think that my MOC’s figures are quite true to scale.

Thanks for visiting this thread again!

Best wishes,
Sven

Edited by Tenderlok

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6 hours ago, Tenderlok said:

A word on the locomotive’s speed: With the two-wagon train, the engine is able to run at approx. 0.5 m/s, which in 1/33 scale is equivalent to 60 km/h in reality. Pulling the heavier train from the second video, it still reaches 0.42 m/s or 50 km/h. I wasn’t able to find out about the prototype’s maximum permitted speed; however, similar Swedish engine classes were allowed to run at 55-60 km/h, so I think that my MOC’s figures are quite true to scale.

Sven

Hi Sven,

magnificient layout and wonderful videos! :wub:

The information about the speed for a true scale of your locomitive are impressive ...thanks for sharing! :thumbup:

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Besides the beautiful pictures beautiful design of the author, I want to point out a very worthy musical accompaniment first video and sound wonderful wonderful work with the composition of the locomotive on the second video. That too sounds like a certain perfect music for attentive ears of admirers of talent of the author.:wub:

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Your consist looks amazing! Now you might want to make a small platform for your passengers.

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13 hours ago, Nemo57 said:

Besides the beautiful pictures beautiful design of the author, I want to point out a very worthy musical accompaniment

I totally agree ...the music is a perfect touch for this amazing work! :thumbup:

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Thanks LEGO Train 12 Volts, Nemo57 and Beck for your comments! Your kind words are very much appreciated. :classic:

On 7.12.2016 at 7:15 AM, LEGO Train 12 Volts said:

The information about the speed for a true scale of your locomitive are impressive

I always try to design my models in a way that enables them to reach a close-to-prototypical top speed.
What I really don't like is to see little shunting engines racing around with TGV- or ICE-like speed... unfortunately, even some "serious" H0 railway models used to show that characteristic until some years ago.

On 7.12.2016 at 10:32 PM, LEGO Train 12 Volts said:
On 7.12.2016 at 9:23 AM, Nemo57 said:

Besides the beautiful pictures beautiful design of the author, I want to point out a very worthy musical accompaniment

I totally agree ...the music is a perfect touch for this amazing work! :thumbup:

Well, I had been feeling for a long time that an instrumental version of Orff's "O Fortuna", with its slow beginning and the flowing, ostinato-like rhythm of the second part, could be suitable as "railway music". So when I had shot my video, I simply tried out...

On 7.12.2016 at 4:59 PM, Beck said:

Now you might want to make a small platform for your passengers.

We'll see... The next project is a rebuild of my 0-6-0T for greater scale accuracy. The necessary parts have already been ordered, so hopefully I'll get finished with that during Christmas holidays.

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18 hours ago, Tenderlok said:

*snip* We'll see... The next project is a rebuild of my 0-6-0T for greater scale accuracy. The necessary parts have already been ordered, so hopefully I'll get finished with that during Christmas holidays.

Are more freight wagons also in the works?

I thought these two engines were interesting:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SJ_F_(steam_locomotive) & https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SJ_D

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12 hours ago, M_slug357 said:

Are more freight wagons also in the works?

I thought these two engines were interesting:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SJ_F_(steam_locomotive) & https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SJ_D

I’ve collected some drawings of tank cars, but have not yet made any actual attempt to design and build models of them. While I’d love to have more cars and run longer trains, it’s not only a matter of storage space, but also of time and costs – those big models take several weeks to build (not to mention the design process), and they are really expensive…

The SJ Litt. F is definitely one of the most beautiful steam engines ever built. Unfortunately, its drive wheel diameter is way beyond anything that could be realised in 1/33 scale while using BBB wheels.
Regarding the SJ D-series, it’s an interesting prototype indeed, but not suitable for my layout: There is no overhead line, for I use my tracks for narrow gauge garden railway models (1/22.5) as well, and I would find it a bit irritating to see a model of an electric loco running without wiring.

Edited by Tenderlok

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3 hours ago, Tenderlok said:

I’ve collected some drawings of tank cars, but have not yet made any actual attempt to design and build models of them. While I’d love to have more cars and run longer trains, it’s not only a matter of storage space, but also of time and costs – those big models take several weeks to build (not to mention the design process), and they are really expensive

I was afraid of that, though not at all surprised.  You have to admit that regular non-LEGO G-gauge cars and locos are also quite expensive.  I'm just curious as to how the cost of these components in LEGO compares with the cost of regular G-gauge components.

Dan-147

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19 hours ago, Dan-147 said:

[...] I'm just curious as to how the cost of these components in LEGO compares with the cost of regular G-gauge components.

When I started MOCing some years ago, I actually thought it would be a rather inexpensive hobby… Errare humanum est.
But of course, it very much depends on how many compromises you are willing to accept: The more details you want to have, the more expensive it gets. Rare parts or colours will drive the price further up.

As for the comparison you asked for, it’s hard to tell exactly what one of my MOCs did cost, as I always buy ca. 10–20% more parts than I actually need. This is not only to have spare pieces in case that I have to change something, but also to be able to select the parts with the best possible colour match (colour variation is a very annoying issue, especially for green, red, dark bluish gray and dark blue!). Besides, part prices vary among BL stores and quite often I have to choose a more expensive seller because of minimum purchase conditions, number of available items etc. But I think the following figures should be quite valid for my MOCs, built (almost) entirely from new bricks:

Open freight car: MOC (standard gauge, 1/33) ca. 200 EUR, LGB (narrow gauge, 1/22.5) 70–100 EUR German street price; 1 EUR ~ 1,45 CAD

2-axle passenger car: MOC ca. 350 EUR, LGB 50–150 EUR

4-axle passenger car: MOC ca. 650 EUR, LGB 150–300 EUR

Locomotive: MOC 600–1000 EUR depending on size, LGB 300 (very simple model) –1000 EUR

As you can see, especially the wagons are quite expensive compared to "conventional“ garden railway models. It’s possible to save a lot of money if you don’t mind buying used parts, though.
And of course hand-made gauge 1 (1/32) brass models are a completely different thing, with locos and passenger wagons for up to several thousand EUR. Needless to say that these models are far, far out of my financial range...

Edited by Tenderlok

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Hi
First of all - your designs look awsome :)
I am currently building the TGOJ and have a few questions I hope you can help with.
I have made a few changes to the design so it can run on standard LEGO (Straight) tracks.
You mention earlier some modifications you have made to the drivetrain to make it run better.
Can you please show those changes?
The 4L Light Bluish grey bar that goes into the side pistons have you modified them to run without fricktion?
Mine have a lot of friction.
Also there does not seem to get a lot of power from the two motors to the wheels.

 

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Hi @snakebyte,

Thank you for your appreciation of my models.
However, please understand that, almost three years after building the model, I don’t remember all changes I made during the process, compared to the lxf file.
Regarding the drivetrain, I think that the main change was substituting the central horizontal driveshaft with a longer one, including an additional bearing at its end. I think you will understand what I mean when comparing the photo of the drivetrain with the rendered cutaway beneath it.
The drawbars should be replaced by one-piece, 3D-printed parts, as they are prone to fall apart. Zephyr1934’s valve gear bars (with a Technic pin as a „hook“ at the end) will be a suitable replacement.

As for the piston rods, no, I didn’t modify the bars. The trick is actually to tinker with manufacturing tolerances: A very small percentage of the ½ Technic pins has a marginally larger inner diameter than the rest, while an equally small percentage of the 4L bars is ever so slightly smaller than average. I think I tried out at least 100 pieces of each type to find the 3 smoothest-running combinations. In addition to that, a drop of lubricant will help to further reduce friction.

Two L motors provide a lot of power. You should check if all shafts and axles can rotate freely – make sure there's always a bit of play between bearing holes and bushes. Lubrication is essential here, too – but don’t use liquid lubricants, they will penetrate between the bricks, cause them to lose clutch power and thus affect the rigidity of the engine frame. Teflon spray, applied with a cotton swab, has yielded satisfactory results.

Best regards,
Sven

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Hi Sven
I understand that it will be difficult to remember after so long :)
Thanks for the info you do remember ;)
 

Thanks
Knud
 

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