Tenderlok

MOC: 1:33 Hohenzollern Oberhausen 0-6-0T with PF

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Hello everyone,

this time I would like to show you my latest PF-driven 1:33 scale model – it’s yet another industrial German 0-6-0T locomotive:

During WW I, the „Gutehoffnungshütte“ in Oberhausen, Germany, commissioned a new locomotive for pulling trains loaded with slag from the company’s iron works to the nearby slag heap. The engine had to be able to negotiate very tight curves, so Hohenzollern locomotive works in Düsseldorf came up with a compact, yet powerful 0-6-0T with an extremely short wheelbase (2500 mm!). As a reference to the customer, the new engines were designated the „Oberhausen“ type.

The model features two L-motors, a rechargeable battery box and a V2 IR receiver. In order to allow access to the on/off switch and the charging socket, the central part of the roof is detachable.

Unlike my previous locomotives, there is no detailed cab interior, for the PF components require most of the space. At least, this is my first LEGO model with movable Walschaerts valve gear (though I have to admit that I had to cut some „3L Technic axles with stud“ to make it work).

The motors are geared to the second axle only; the first and third axle are driven by the side rods. Initially, I had some doubts whether this solution would work, but happily it does very well.

The only non-LEGO parts I used for this model are the stickers and custom made builder’s plates (photo-etched brass parts from Beckert-Modellbau).

But let’s stop talking, here are the pictures:

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Note the prototypic buffers: In each driving direction, the left one is flat and the right one curved.

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Two boat weights help to increase adhesion weight and pulling power; besides, they compensate for the heavy PF components in the rear. For the complete drivetrain layout, please check the LXF file:

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The whole train:

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Of course, there is a video, too. I was somewhat in a hurry while taking it, so please excuse the camera shake. Perhaps I should ask Santa for a tripod… :wink:

Thanks for your interest,

best wishes

Sven

Edited by Tenderlok

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Oh wow! Another fantastic build! If you keep this up you might just help start a G-guage lego train building movement. It looks great. Are the 2xn plates over the cab windows about the right size? Perhaps a 1x2 plate with rail would allow you to get rid of the studs? (not to say studs are bad, they are one of the few hints as to what this locomotive is actually made of). So how well does that gear train do for transferring power from the motor to the wheels? Do you have a single gear train that transfers power for both motors or one gear train for each motor?

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Incredible. What another excelent creation. You really know how to make your LEGO trains in this scale.

I didn't even notice the occacional stud here and there.

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It's amazing to see how Lego can lead to delightful models when in the right hands! :wub:

Another excellent construction without compromise: all details have been played and the result is breathtaking! :wub_drool: :wub_drool: :wub_drool:

I hope to se new MOCs from you Tenderlok :thumbup:

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wonderfull, the rendering is impressive! Just one request: since you make exact scale model please put a photo of the original because it's very difficult to find images of this locomotive.

Obviously for a tenderlok is almost impossible to have a detailed cab, if you want to make a self moving object, but perhaps a working door would add the icing on the cake.

many compliments

Sergio and Eros

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Thanks to all of you for your kind words!

Are the 2xn plates over the cab windows about the right size? Perhaps a 1x2 plate with rail would allow you to get rid of the studs?

Yes, the prototype had quite large sun visors above the cab windows. These were slightly rounded on top, which I tried to represent by using studded plates instead of tiles.

So how well does that gear train do for transferring power from the motor to the wheels? Do you have a single gear train that transfers power for both motors or one gear train for each motor?

It’s a single central gear train. After several rebuilds, the current version (as represented in the LXF file) works perfectly and indeed more reliable than the tender drive of my 0-8-0. It’s important, though, to use the newer reinforced 8-tooth gear wheels, as the older ones tend to slip out of meshing.

I hope to se new MOCs from you Tenderlok :thumbup:

I’ll definitely keep on designing and building train MOCs, I just can’t say how long it will take until a new one is finished. Unfortunately, I have to spend quite an amount of time for such ugly things as working and earning money… :wink:

Next, I would like to have a small articulated locomotive, maybe a Saxon I TV or a Bavarian BB II, but I don’t know yet how to get it right. Perhaps I’ll get some inspiration during Christmas holidays.

Just one request: since you make exact scale model please put a photo of the original because it's very difficult to find images of this locomotive.

I’m sorry, but due to license issues I can’t show a photo of the prototype here in this forum. I sent you a PM.

Obviously for a tenderlok is almost impossible to have a detailed cab, if you want to make a self moving object, but perhaps a working door would add the icing on the cake.

Yes, that would be fine. But honestly, I have no idea how to make it...

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I’m sorry, but due to license issues I can’t show a photo of the prototype here in this forum. I sent you a PM.

Yes, that would be fine. But honestly, I have no idea how to make it...

I haven't got anything till now my exact e-mail is monai@oats.inaf.it, I'm very curious. Well as regard the doors it depends how the original is made, if it opens outward or inward etc. anyway your realization is exceptionally well made, you make a very clever use of the larger scale advantages.

Sergio

P.S.: ok I've realized late that you meant eurobricks messenger and not my personal e-mail, thanks again

Edited by monai

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Your 1:33 Hohenzollern Oberhausen 0-6-0T with PF is just brilliant, full of detail, it makes my 1:19 (16mm Scale) Lego Lady Anne Narrow Gauge Steam Locomotive a bit plain

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Thanks again for your appreciation!

And video shows good speed, too!

A bit too good, to be honest…

The prototype was restricted to a maximum permitted speed of 30 km/h (ca. 19 mph), for it had very poor running characteristics due to its short wheelbase. The model, however, is able to run at a speed of about 0.4 m/s (with not too heavy trains), which would be just under 50 km/h in reality.

So the miniature engine driver should better not let his locomotive run at full throttle, or he’ll risk a substantial fine… :wink:

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This is absolutely stunning. As a lifelong LGB 1:22.5 collector, these engines look very familiar to me, but never have I seen anything like this in LEGO.

Are you able to share more about the brass build plates? How were they incorporated into the model? And what wheels did you use?

I see you also have brick-built carriages. Any more detailed photos of those?

Again, amazing work!

--Rob

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Thanks Sylvian, brickblues, Crossbones, Asper and Rob for your praise!

Are you able to share more about the brass build plates? How were they incorporated into the model?

While the white lettering is made with transparent DYMO labels, the "Gutehoffnungshütte" emblems and the number plates are printed on self-adhesive metallic inkjet foil. However, I couldn't cut out the elliptic builder's plates precisely enough, so I ordered these parts by Thomas Beckert, custom-made with prototypical factory number and year of construction:

Fabrikschild.jpg

They are held in place by a small piece of double-sided adhesive film and can be removed without any harm to the LEGO bricks.

And what wheels did you use?

I used following wheels for my train MOCs:

Hohenzollern 0-6-0T: LEGO large driving wheels

G7.1 0-8-0: BBB XL drivers (engine), BBB L drivers (tender)

Krupp Knapsack: BBB XL drivers

Wagons: BBB L drivers

I see you also have brick-built carriages. Any more detailed photos of those?

Sorry, just the photos on my Bricksafe account. And the LXF files, of course.

As a lifelong LGB 1:22.5 collector [...]

You might like to hear that my next MOC will actually be a 1:22.5, fully LGB-compatible narrow gauge 2-4-4-2 Mallet locomotive. Designing this monster (4 L motors, 2 battery boxes, 2 IR receivers) just turns out to be much more complex than I had expected, but I hope that the engine will be ready in March/April... :wink:

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Thanks for the added information-- I see now what you used the brass plates for. Very nice and realistic effect.

When you say you're working on a 2-4-4-2 Mallet, I dream of the LGB 2085D-- this is perhaps my favorite loco of all time.

LGB_2085_0-6-6-0-Steam_Loco_rt_side_1280.jpg

Can't wait to see your next creation!

--Rob

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