Milan

Way of connecting two parts

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Hey all.

I am away from my computer so i would try to explain like this.

I am looking for a way to connect two bricks, or brick with plate or plate with plate, in a way that they are facing their studs in the oposite direction. So, when connected, top brick would have its studs facing up, and the bottom brick would have its studs facing down.

I know there is a way to do this with two bricks, with inserting technic half pins in one brick, but i hate the gap that is made that way. So i was wondering is there a way to do this but without any gaps visible.

Oh, it would be great if this would be possible with bricks or plates 1 x n.

Thanks for any ideas.

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Perhaps something like this? "Inventory" on the left, pseudo-brick on the right.

pseudo_brick.png

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I don't have a camera handy to illustrate at the moment, but I'll try to explain this as well as I can...

It is possible to make a four plate high, reverse stud assembly by combining a 2x3 brick with a 2x3 plate using 4 cheese wedge parts. I've used this often for my sculptures. The trick is to flip the plate over and put the cheese wedges (on their sides) into the corners of the plate with the diagonal face of the wedge pressed up against the the round stud catcher ridge on the underside of the plate and the right angle edge of the wedge snugged into the corner. It'll be a tight fit (and likely "illegal" connection) but it works.

The wedge parts are not symmetric. Align the longer edge of the wedge with the long edge of the plate.

Once you have all four wedges in place, the 2x3 brick can be slid down on top of the plate, creating an assembly with smooth sides (no gap) and studs on top and bottom.

As a side note, I prefer to use polycarb wedges (the trans-clear parts) with ABS ("normal" Lego) bricks and plates, as it holds better than ABS on ABS. If you do poly-on-poly (all clear parts) you might break something trying to get it apart later.

Edited by ShaydDeGrai

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Djm: thanks, that nice solution. Too bad it can not be made at any length, but great idea!

Shayd: oh yeah, i remember that! Can it be used with 2x2 bricks and plates (and 2x4), or just with 2x3?

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Shayd: oh yeah, i remember that! Can it be used with 2x2 bricks and plates (and 2x4), or just with 2x3?

It can be built bigger (like 2x4 or 2x6, etc) but the proportions of the wedge brick make it harder to do 2x2. You can do a 2x2 if you use only two wedge pieces in opposite corners of the plate but the connection isn't as strong (may or may not matter depending on how much weight you're trying to support).

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Thanks. I will try those to see what can i make.

I will also try to find some solution for 1 x n.

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Why not a 1x1 with a ring ( the thick kind ) that is also a very small solution, and easely hidden.

grtz Saint

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Maybe?

brick.jpg

Beat me to it! This works very well, but can't really be reduced in size. Also, you can do this with click hinges to achieve 1xn size, but it'll be 5 plates thick because of the size of the click hinge joint itself, so the old finger hinges are definitely preferred for most things I'd use this option for. :classic:

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Maybe?

........

Thanks! This seems like great solution. It has small tiny gaps where hinges are connecting, but nevertheless, its very nice!

Saint: i dont get it, what is 1x1 with ring?

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You Can also take 2 headlight bricks, 1 1x1 technic brick and a 1x1 plate, place the one headlight brick in the other with the vertical stud facing down, put the 1x1 plate on the downwards facing stud, then place the 1x1 technic brick at the end. I hope it makes sense, this will give you a 1x3 brick with the middle stud facing down.

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I also hate using the technic pin wedged into the base of a brick.

Besides the finger hinge technique, here is a technique I have used. Take this piece:

4081b.gif

placed on its side so that the studs on the ring point up and down. Then you only have to worry about hiding the plate off to the side, or you can build onto it, as seen below.

Here is a picture from a build I did where I used a few of them to attach the top and bottom of a ship, both with studs facing out:

17026381549_538c2e37a7_z.jpg

I used three of them here to attach the whole thing securely, two on their sides, and the third holding the other two together.

Good luck!

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92960 works also, likewise placed on its side, I've used it for some opposite-direction building, plus you can build off the third direction also

4640844.jpg

Edited by JGW3000

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You can have two plates back-to-back with no gap using lever handles. The plates need to be at least 3x4, but 4x4 or larger is better.

The lever handles get wedged to the bottom of the plates so that the circle on the lever fits between two tubes.

--

Marc.

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Wow, so many nice suggestion, thanks! I am coming home in a two days and cant wait to try them.

If anyone has some more ideas please share them.

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Hi Guys

This topic has started me thinking about something I've been wondering for a while.

Is there a better way of connecting the part arrowed (Part 6191) to the rest of the body without needing the brick with grove (Part 2653) & plates under it and the plate with door rail (Part 32028)? I know I could use the methods shown in posts 8 & 16 above but I don't want the gaps.

I know the way I've done it may be a bit of a Heath Robinson solution but it's all I could think of. The reason I ask is the brick with groove is making it difficult to build & fit seats.

Any help/ideas will be very much appreciated.

IMG_5731.JPG

Edited by grum64

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You could try replacing one of the plates with this:

88072.jpg

or a similar piece, facing inward. Then you would only need to find a way to include a clip to hold it on the inside, and there are a variety of ways to do that, which you could play around with until you found one to build your seats around.

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You could try replacing one of the plates with this:

88072.jpg

or a similar piece, facing inward. Then you would only need to find a way to include a clip to hold it on the inside, and there are a variety of ways to do that, which you could play around with until you found one to build your seats around.

That's great. Thank you for taking the time to reply.

I'm relatively new to SNOT building and at the moment have only been building this way with LDD. I'll let you know how things go.

Thanks again.

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Hi Guys

Any help/ideas will be very much appreciated.

IMG_5731.JPG

You Can also replace the modified plate With a regular 2xX plate and place some 1x2x1 panels on it and the will latch on to studs in the chassis, then make sure you build the chassis back on top of the snotted elements to hold them in place. This will give you a really solid structure. Again, I hope it makes sense, on my phone at work:)

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You Can also replace the modified plate With a regular 2xX plate and place some 1x2x1 panels on it and the will latch on to studs in the chassis, then make sure you build the chassis back on top of the snotted elements to hold them in place. This will give you a really solid structure. Again, I hope it makes sense, on my phone at work:)

That makes complete sense. Thank you for your help.

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