nerdsforprez

Importance of good photos

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Hello All,

I consider myself somewhat novice in terms of building. Currently, I am in the process of moving my family, and therefore most of my LEGO is packed up. However, I still have my laptop and realized the other day that I really needed to update some of by old MOC's photos. I had already doctored my newer MOC's photos, realizing late in the game how important it is to take time to really do a nice job with photos, but my older stuff really needed some work. I have written about and posted all photos here:

http://mocpages.com/moc.php/414606

Briefly, here is an example of what I discuss and posted in the link above. As can be seen, one photo gives a much better presentation of the model than another. To many, this may seem like a no -brainer, and in hindsight it really is. But from a somewhat novice's perspective, it is not. I began building with only the intent to build. Then came the desire to share (but without consideration of the importance of presentation). Later, came an appreciation for presentation. Evolution of an AFOL :classic:

post-126355-0-49974100-1434722461.jpg

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Good pictures are of course important but i don't think pictures this good would be really necessary. In my opinion: simple pictures like your crane on the floor are better because you can see the scale clearly. Like how your falcon looks way bigger than the one on the table.

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I can respect your comment. I think many may disagree with you though. I know personally, I like photos that are doctored a bit. Mine are somewhat involved, yes, but there are others whose are much better and more doctored. I really enjoy them. Also, in terms of scale, I think those who really know LEGO know the scale without needing a comparison. There are the studs.... and a brief look @ something gives on an idea of its size just based on studs. Also, many can just look at a model, nearly automatically discern a piece or element, know its size, and therefore pick up the relative size of the model based on one piece. It happens like clockwork, fast as a computer.... almost automatic

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For the table shot, you could move in or zoom in closer or crop it so more details could be seen. I don't think a lot of post editing would make a better MOC other using up time that could be spent building or planning the MOC.

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I agree, pictures can make a world of difference. I have seen some amazing MOCs but unfortunately the pictures are too dark or blurry and it really takes away from the presentation.

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I am bad at LEGO pictures. I have a (smallish) lightbox, I'v read the tutorials, I've done a lot of practice shots... Nope. That's why I don't post MOCs.

And I've even done some actual paid non-portrait photography work outside of the hobby, but I can't get it right when it comes to the lil' plastic brickstacks.

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I think good photos are everything in a review or presentation of an MOC. They add to the overall look of a review and makes people want to read on. Using a clear, crisp images also help outline key features of a set/MOC.

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It's all really about the finished image. Wether you like it or not.

I always hated the photography part as I found it frustrating trying to get the shot I wanted. Especially since I was just shot loads of pics and was hoping for the best.

You can make a great moc and have it let down badly by unappealing photos. I am taking it more seriously now. It's a steep learning curve but there's lots of tutorials online.

I realised that some very simple mocs can appear great as a result of skillful photography.

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What pad said. It's annoying but it helps a lot. I've seen mocs that I would flat-out call garbage get tons of likes and views because of the proper photographing, and great mocs tossed to the deep corners of the internet never to be seen again because of blurry or unprocessed or poorly-lit photos. Sometimes it can even lead you into new hobbies. I'm currently starting to get more into photography and photo editing because of my lego hobby, which is pretty cool!

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