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Well, Michael Ozzie beat me to it today with his outstanding La Belle Alliance, but here is my build celebrating the 200th Anniversary of this major event. Click on the picture for more detail:

18719395850_15ee784cd3.jpg

200 years ago today, a truly epic and historical battle raged between three armies on sodden fields near the Belgian hamlet of Waterloo. The conflict determined the fate of Napoleon Bonaparte once and for all, and changed Europe forever as Great Britain became the dominant power over France, and Germany's power began to rise in the world as well.

To commemorate this historic anniversary and pay tribute to the brave souls who fought and perished there, here is a quick build of that iconic Napoleonic Era infantry formation, the Regimental Square (or putting it more accurately, a corner of one...)

Brave French Cuirassiers (Heavy Cavalry) charge this indomitable formation, the British Square, to no avail; in spite of all their courage, armor and powerful mounts, they never break through that long day as every British Square which had time to form never broke (though some units such as the Kings German Legion (KGL) 8th Line Battalion were caught mid-formation by the French cavalry and were decimated). British officers on horseback called for the rank and file to remain steady, and in general they did, allowing the Duke of Wellington's multi-national army to survive long enough for the arrival of the third army, the Prussians, to tip the balance.

There should be bayonets on the end of those muskets, which is why it was so hard for cavalry to charge into a RS like this one. The LEGO musket barrel shape prevents anything but 2nd-party elements from working well, and being a bit of a purist (apart from that flag from Cape Madness) I won't use those non-LEGO parts.

JBIronworks and I are currently working on a massive build of the key farmhouse in the center of the British line at Waterloo, La Haye Sainte, defended by the 2nd Light Infantry Battalion of the KGL; we should have it done in a few weeks so keep an eye out for it. Originally I had wanted to post La Haye Sainte today but we ran out of time. We will certainl finish it and it will be posted here in a month or so.

Cheers!

Edited by Gary The Procrastinator

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Your historic builds are fabulous, Gary. I knew you had this one coming and it doesn't disappoint. Yes, it's small, and doesn't have the vast visual impact of large armies on a battlefield, but it still looks great. The tight formation is nice and the vegetation looks perfect despite being so simple.

I'm anxious to see the rest. I'll definitely keep an eye out!

From the perspective of modern times some of those old fighting tactics seem silly. I can't imagine charging headlong into a wall of bayonets. Now everyone gets upset over a few lost lives but back then soldiers were just a number to be used and regularly replaced. I suppose the advent of high explosives and exploding shells in particular changed a lot of that but still, fighting head-to-head in perfect formation always seemed too relaxed, too - shall I say - gentlemanly. We're talking war!

But back on topic: this is another fine rendition of those famous events. Keep it up!

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Well done! I like how you presented the infantry square, one of the best defensive formations of those centuries.

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Fantastic presentation Gary! That's a beautiful formation you have going there. I'm excited to see your full collaborative build once it's done!

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Very good. A good British Square. One of the highlights of the battle for sure, when all the British formed squares against the French Cavalry. I like those French Cuirassiers, I have the helmets, but what did you use as their armour and torso, for I cannot see their fronts. Anyway, great work.

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Your historic builds are fabulous, Gary. I knew you had this one coming and it doesn't disappoint. Yes, it's small, and doesn't have the vast visual impact of large armies on a battlefield, but it still looks great. The tight formation is nice and the vegetation looks perfect despite being so simple. I'm anxious to see the rest. I'll definitely keep an eye out!

From the perspective of modern times some of those old fighting tactics seem silly. I can't imagine charging headlong into a wall of bayonets. Now everyone gets upset over a few lost lives but back then soldiers were just a number to be used and regularly replaced. I suppose the advent of high explosives and exploding shells in particular changed a lot of that but still, fighting head-to-head in perfect formation always seemed too relaxed, too - shall I say - gentlemanly. We're talking war! But back on topic: this is another fine rendition of those famous events. Keep it up!

Thank you so much Capt Dee! It doesn't make sense the way we think today, but muskets and sabres were marginally effective at achieving results unless they were used en masse. Muskets of this age really were unreliable at hitting targets beyond 50 meters. By the time of the American Civil War however, all muskets had rifled barrels, improving their accuracy. But if you wanted to achieve results in the Napoleonic Era, it was all about mass and maneuver, unlike our modern tactics of stealth and quick strike. It took amazing courage to do what these men did, charging toward a horrible death by bayonet....

Fantastic! :pir-classic:

Thanks Graham!

Well done! I like how you presented the infantry square, one of the best defensive formations of those centuries.

Thank you! Agreed on the regimental square. It was outstanding against cavalry, but opposing infantry could smash right through it, and artillery fire was brutal on them.

Good job, awesome way to commemorate the day.

Thank you, I appreciate it! I had wanted to finish La Haye Sainte by the 18th, but alas, life got in the way.

Fantastic presentation Gary! That's a beautiful formation you have going there. I'm excited to see your full collaborative build once it's done!

Thank you Aaron! La Haye Sainte will be up no later than mid-July.

Very good. A good British Square. One of the highlights of the battle for sure, when all the British formed squares against the French Cavalry. I like those French Cuirassiers, I have the helmets, but what did you use as their armour and torso, for I cannot see their fronts. Anyway, great work.

Thank you! It's the Governor's torso from Pirates II: And the leg assembly is tan. I am shooting for this uniform:

242924cv06120officier20de20cuirassiers.jpg

Edited by Gary The Procrastinator

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This scene (and others like it) reminds me of the lines from Tennyson's "Charge of the Light Brigade." Specifically the words "Theirs not to question why / Theirs but to do, and die / Forward the light brigade." I know it was from the Crimean War but the thought applies so hauntingly to battlefields the world over.

I'm anxious to see the rest. Gary, I'm glad you took your time. Rushing it probably wouldn't have been nearly as good. We know what you're capable of doing, so I take it this particular scene is just the appetizer!

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Oh, I had not commented on this so far: this is brilliant.

Choice of helmets for the French is a great idea!

And rightfully you have chosen grey trousers for the British (they could be light grey, actually).

The thing is, I have just been to Waterloo to see the site of the battle. They've built an exhibition now which is really good.

And then we watched the 1970 movie "Waterloo" (If you haven't I can only recommend!) - and then we saw a 200-year-documentary. So I am very much into the topic.

Therefore your builds are an excellent match and they are historically perfect!

"Nothing except a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won"...

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Nice MOC!

I usually don't like changes in the style of games or toys etc. I'm really nostalgic, when it comes to my childhood and I don't want to see other people changing the things I've known into another shape. Like I stick to the first version of red- and bluecoats and my figure's skin definitely is yellow.

But the Lego horses really are an improvement. They are a perfect example of how progress should be made.

Greetings,

Wellesley!

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This scene (and others like it) reminds me of the lines from Tennyson's "Charge of the Light Brigade." Specifically the words "Theirs not to question why / Theirs but to do, and die / Forward the light brigade." I know it was from the Crimean War but the thought applies so hauntingly to battlefields the world over. I'm anxious to see the rest. Gary, I'm glad you took your time. Rushing it probably wouldn't have been nearly as good. We know what you're capable of doing, so I take it this particular scene is just the appetizer!

Wow Captain Dee, that is an incredible compliment and I thank you! Good news, Joshua and I have completed La Haye Sainte and it's even better than I thought it would be. We just need to set up the figs (about 125 King's German Legion and 350+ French infantry), take the shots and then Gimp some of them to post. Hopefully this weekend.

Oh, I had not commented on this so far: this is brilliant. Choice of helmets for the French is a great idea! And rightfully you have chosen grey trousers for the British (they could be light grey, actually).

The thing is, I have just been to Waterloo to see the site of the battle. They've built an exhibition now which is really good.

And then we watched the 1970 movie "Waterloo" (If you haven't I can only recommend!) - and then we saw a 200-year-documentary. So I am very much into the topic. Therefore your builds are an excellent match and they are historically perfect!

"Nothing except a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won"...

Oh Capt B I am way jealous of you going to the battlefield! I hope to go next year if our finances work out. I have that 1970 Waterloo on DVD and it is superb, especially the sequence with the Scots Greys charging just like out of Lady Butler's Scotland Forever! painting. I also love that flyover shot of the British squares as the cuirassiers attack. And I have always admired that quote from Wellington. Yes I went with dark bley as it's more akin to the campaign wear they had on, though I do have one unit in white leg assembly. Thank you.

Nice MOC! I usually don't like changes in the style of games or toys etc. I'm really nostalgic, when it comes to my childhood and I don't want to see other people changing the things I've known into another shape. Like I stick to the first version of red- and bluecoats and my figure's skin definitely is yellow. But the Lego horses really are an improvement. They are a perfect example of how progress should be made.

Greetings,

Wellesley!

Totally understand. I've kept one of my four British units in white legs just for that reason, but we are shooting for the greatest realism here while still using 100% LEGO (exept the flags). Thank you for the comment very much.

ALL: I highly highly recommend a new book by Brendan Simms called The Longest Afternoon: the 400 Men Who Decided the Battle of Waterloo. While the subtitle is suspect, this short book is one of the best accounts I've read, centering on the 2nd Light Battalion of KGL that defended La Haye Sainte. The thing reads like an adventure novel rather than dry history, and reminds one of the 1964 movie ZULU very much. Great stuff.

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