The Deleter

Good Knot Techniques for LEGO Strings and Threads

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We all have to figure this out at some point or another in order to use certain pieces in LEGO. Some learn how to wrangle the rope and string in summer camp, others with their shoelaces and other household objects. However, I'm betting that most first-time LEGO builders learned it their own way: the hard way.

Some of my first sets I've ever built - the Inventor series - required string for many a build, and let me tell you, it was hard finding a good knot meathod. Multiple times the string would just slip right out of it's knot, letting the swinging monkey plummet to the ground; and if I did find a working knot, I'd still have to take it down as soon as possible, as any tighter then knot got, the more impossible it was to undo it. I've lost plenty a good string due to this factor, and definitely don't want to risk anymore.

Considering LEGOs are all about constructing then deconstructing pieces to be just as usable as before, the same should apply to the string and the pieces it attaches to, too. And what better way to help newcomers to the element than to archive a thread dedicated to such info?

So, what works for you so far?

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Interesting, that after SNOT techniques, we're discussing KNOT techniques :tongue: .

I'm quite traumatized by all the knots in my beautiful Lego strings, so I've learnt to avoid them. Because to attach a string, you don't necessarily have to tie a knot. Usually, I just wedge the string between two bricks/plates. Or put it through a Technic brick and insert a peg in it. It works beautifully: my yellow monkey never discovered the way gravity works. And what's more: you don't have to remove knots afterwards. Agreed, sometimes, the string gets damaged a bit, but it's still better than having a naughty knot in it, so I stick with the 'technique'. I'm curious to see what the knot experts have to say though!

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What works for me?

a) double-knots.

b) knot-avoidance, just likeBEAVeR mentioned.

But I find the double-knots hard to do and they never end up where I want them to be... :cry_sad:

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Interesting topic, I would also like to know how people tie their knots when there is no other option available, I hate to waste the string more than anything (I very rearely create MOCs that need string in them) so my problem is finding a knot I can do easily with my rather fat fingers whilst saving as much string as possible.

I just use a double knot at the moment

Edited by Mutant Orc

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I find the Clinch Knot works best when connecting string to a hook or onto a reel. Google fishing knots Clinch knot and it should come up.

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I use a noose knot.

Same here, though I usually skip the traditional 13 coils in favor of just 5 or 6. I'm also fond of the tumble hitch.

I prefer the noose if I can slide the element out of the loop (such as anchoring to an axle).

If I need to tie something through a hole in a single piece, I prefer the hitch.

Both have the advantage of being really strong but easy to undo.

Remove the element from the loop of a noose and apply pressure the the top of the knot and the knot unravels from the inside out.

With a tumble hitch, where the the knot has two leads coming off of it, pull on one lead and the knot gets tighter, pull on the other and the knot unravels. It can be a pain to tie compared to a simple square knot, but you don't need a pair of tweezers, a magnifying glass and a ten minute long diatribe of profanities to untie it somewhere down the line.

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