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The "Golden Age" for lego Technic, is it now?


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#51 hrontos

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Posted 02 December 2012 - 09:23 PM

View PostDLuders, on 01 December 2012 - 06:08 PM, said:

If one considers the information and opportunities available to Technic FANS (as opposed to just the official sets), the "Golden Age" of Lego Technic is happening now, for these reasons (to name a few notable ones):   

I agree with this. The informations we get now and comunication oportunities combined with the widest part range ever we have now really good time for technic. When I compare this to what oportunities were available 20 years ago, this is a completely different level. Even without the internet, the part range and the new power functions make it much more fun than it was in the past.

I wonder what TLG thinks. It is golden age for technic also from their point of view? Is it growing theme? Does it attract wider audience than it did a few years ago? I hope it is and they will make it grow further. Of course, it is more difficult, since technic does not get any "help" from some popular movie like SW or LOTR, but I hope it will grow. I also treat this year TC as a some kind of positive signal.

#52 Paul Boratko

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 06:05 AM

The Golden Age for me was when the 8448 Street Sensation was released... Obviously every year since then, the Technic theme has been improving more and more every year...

I just got back from doing Kidsfest in Pittsburgh and the Lego store sold out of technic sets.. That was a very positive thing to see here in the United States...

As far as the brick type goes, for a guy who got his first Technic set back in the late 70's and then went through the entire 80's with them, I don't think that I would ever want to go back to those traditional bricks again... I just feel that models built with the newer styled elements are much more challenging and have an end result that is much Nicer...
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#53 prateek

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 06:22 AM

I would say yes, but I expect things to get even better, bar a total mess up on Lego's part. PF and Mindstorms are looking cooler than ever, and every set that comes out is really good.

#54 DarkShadow73

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 01:17 PM

Funny that local TRU's have stocked all of the 2H2012 sets since they come out, usually once the first batch sold out, I only saw some of the smaller sets on their shelves except for an occasional surprise, like the 8043 and 8070, that reappeared in the spring of this year, and for the first time I saw 9397 on the shelf there, but with the holiday rush they are all selling out fast.  Only time will tell if they restock after Xmas.

As far as the Golden Age, as Paul B. pointed out I came out of my dark ages with the 8448 Supercar, but then they started specializing on those smaller sets in 2002 and into 2003, Slizers, Throwbots, etc., and I was turned off until the 8455 Backhoe Loader and 8454 Rescue Truck were released then I've been into it whole-heartedly since then, skipping some of the 'kiddie' tiny sets.  They do keep getting better and better and more complex in the past few years...but then I started collecting vintage studded sets from the late 80's into the mid 90's, this summer I got that bug, paid way more than I should have but got some I wanted (both sealed and used but complete sets) from that era at decent prices due to a local BL storekeeper a few miles from me so no shipping costs, that was nice, but I've cleared the seller out of most of ones I wanted, only 1 still on my list is the 8462 Tow Truck, but money is now tight, just have to take a chance the seller still has some available.  There are advantages and disadvantages to studless vs. studded sets.  I think the Golden Age, no matter what I might have said earlier has been going on since the late 80's and continues to this day.

#55 Paul B

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 07:35 AM

I was just about to start a topic like this.

Now, almost two years on, do we feel that things have improved, gotten worse or stayed the same as far as  the "golden age" of LEGO Technic? Overall have we reached the limit of what sets can be and the real improvements will come from MOC's and those who can push the hobby in a new direction?

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#56 Anio

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 07:53 AM

View PostPaul B, on 04 September 2014 - 07:35 AM, said:

I was just about to start a topic like this.

Now, almost two years on, do we feel that things have improved, gotten worse or stayed the same as far as  the "golden age" of LEGO Technic? Overall have we reached the limit of what sets can be and the real improvements will come from MOC's and those who can push the hobby in a new direction?
There are some obvious improvements on the pneumatic system (longer cylinders, autovavle). Personally, I do not dream of those parts everyday, but it still would be a nice addition to the Lego Technic theme.

Otherwise, with 2.5/3K part models, the Technic team is more or less facing the limit of the system... Friction became too big in bigger sets, torque of motors may not be enough, etc. Such bigs model may not work properly.

#57 Freekysch

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 08:49 AM

For me, personally, i think the golden year for LEGO Technic was 2009. The Crane Truck and the Front Loader are some of my favorite models and they both were released in 2009. But, overall, in the years that passed Technic has gone a long way and models kept being better and better.
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#58 afol1969

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 09:13 AM

I came out of my Technic dark ages in 2012, the time before I didn't know there were already amazing sets years before, like the 8043, 8258 etc. The Unimog was one of my first Technic sets, I was surprised how much development there was the last 30 years. Late 70's I got the 853 and some following sets, but at the beginning of the 80's there were my dark ages.
And now I've found new enthusiasm in Technic, more than ever before. IMHO the golden Technic age began 2009/2010 :classic: And I hope it will persist more years in future.

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#59 Richie

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 09:42 AM

View PostFreekysch, on 04 September 2014 - 08:49 AM, said:

models kept being better and better.
I have to disagree with you about this. :classic:  While TECHNIC sets became bigger and with more types of pieces, it's strange to me that the older sets often achieve more with less parts. Nice to see a mobile crane with a motor on it, but if it lacks something simple as a gear-driven slewing of the top part I prefer the old 8460, which is almost perfect in a functional point of view. The same for the supercars: nice to have a supercar where a gear shift switches to motorized functions but it's not what real cars do and makes the model unrealistic to me. Either the 8880 (my favourite) or the 8448 are better than their modern equivalent. The 8868 Air Tech Claw Rig has better controls compared to the Unimog and achieve it with less than half of the parts. I can only imagine what the designers back then would come up with if they were allowed to design 2000+ sets (to be fair probably less, sets back then used a much lower pin count).

For me the mid 90s were the golden age. Complicated models, with motor usage that actually made sense, Functions like crane slewing were not skipped. :classic:

It's multifunctionomical.

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#60 Boulderer

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 10:43 AM

I would have to agree about the standard of the modern sets.  More PF does not necessarily make for a better designed set.  I think it can actually mask a lack of real ingenuity, the likes of which were seen in the 8880 and 8460 sets.  The modern sets are great, don't get me wrong, but when you look at the number of components (total and special) versus the functionality, I can't help thinking that there are missed opportunities.  

On another angle, there seem to be few original subjects.  How many diggers, of various incarnations, does anyone really need?!  A few PF components, a bigger bucket, and high price tag; does that really make the 42030 the mega set that many make out?  I remain to be convinced.

#61 Cumulonimbus

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 11:08 AM

View PostBoulderer, on 04 September 2014 - 10:43 AM, said:

More PF does not necessarily make for a better designed set.  I think it can actually mask a lack of real ingenuity, the likes of which were seen in the 8880 and 8460 sets.

I agree with you, in fact is was discussed in this topic: http://www.eurobrick...showtopic=98984.

On the other hand, I recently bought and build the 8880. I never owned this set and was excited about the trip down memory lane by building studfull for the first time in a very long time. However, I wasn't as impressed with the 8880 as I expected. I feel there could have been more attention to details at this scale (adjustable seat position, openable doors, better interior, engine details, ...). The construction itself somehow lacked ingeniuity, I can't exactly get my finger on why, but I think I might be spoiled by the great studless sets of the last decade.

More to the point, for me personally, the real advantage of studless is the increase of functionality and complexity of small and medium scale sets. Combined with the increasing realism and attention to details in the looks of the models, partly thanks to the panels and flex axles, means that I really think this is the golden age of Technic. And I get the feeling that we will see a lot of great sets and MOCs.

#62 Kierna

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 11:25 AM

I don't remember starting this thread :laugh:

Great parts have been coming out since 2012. Smaller parts offering more complex connections and lighter, stronger structures.
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#63 Milan

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 12:01 PM

View PostRichie, on 04 September 2014 - 09:42 AM, said:

Nice to see a mobile crane with a motor on it, but if it lacks something simple as a gear-driven slewing of the top part I prefer the old 8460, which is almost perfect in a functional point of view.

It is simple function, but it is better without it in a big crane. Imagine rotating the superstructure with hand, while the model has gear-driven rotation.
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#64 Jeroen Ottens

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 02:10 PM

View PostRichie, on 04 September 2014 - 09:42 AM, said:

I can only imagine what the designers back then would come up with if they were allowed to design 2000+ sets (to be fair probably less, sets back then used a much lower pin count).

For me the mid 90s were the golden age. Complicated models, with motor usage that actually made sense, Functions like crane slewing were not skipped. :classic:

I started building this in 1998 when I was still working as a technic designer @ Lego... I estimate the part count around 3000 - 4000. We could use a bit of our time to create our own designs, so there were some amazing MOD's & MOC's in the office. But this was the biggest & most complicated technic model that was ever made at that time.

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I think the combination of studded frame with studless covering gave the best compromise between functions & aesthetics. We still need some more clever parts to be able to make stiff & rigid frames that can support both big models & good bracing of axles and gears. So I do have some hope that we will see an even better age coming where we get the funcions back from the 90's but then in a completely studless building style.

#65 Richard Dower

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 02:20 PM

II only started collecting in the last year...but have 60 sets. I think TLG make too many small sets, anything in the €10 - 30 range is pretty usless...unless you want parts, like 42022. The best sets ever released imo are 8275, 8043, 8258, 8265, 8070. As Technic fans we want BIG sets....but they cost big money, i think TLG should create a special Technic AFOL range of sets for each year.

Re-release one classic Technic set...like 8275 and then maybe 3 more very large sets to cater to AFOLs.

#66 Kierna

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 02:22 PM

I see lots of 45 degree LBG connectors :wink:
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