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A native speaker of English needed


131 replies to this topic

#101 rriggs

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 09:41 AM

View PostMr Man, on 15 April 2012 - 07:36 PM, said:

The Big Ben is another sight. It is a high tower with a big clock in it.
=> Is the preposition OK?

Yes it's fine (though tecnicaly Big Ben refers to the bell inside the tower alone, the tower is St Stevens tower but it's still generaly called Big Ben).
In or On is OK although I think that on sounds better.  Mr Man - St Steven's tower was the old tower before the current Houses of Parliament  was built.  It was knocked down and the current clock tower built in it's place.  The current tower is simply called the "Clock Tower".

View PostMr Man, on 15 April 2012 - 07:36 PM, said:

I want to tell you how life is here.
=> OK or what life is like?

What life is like here.
Either "I want to tell you how life is here." or "I want to tell you what life is like here." is fine.

View PostMr Man, on 15 April 2012 - 07:36 PM, said:

It's a wonderful life in Dover.
=> It's a wonderful life that I lead in Dover.
=> Life is wonderful in Dover.

It's a wonderful life in Dover or Life is wonderful in Dover.

"Life is wonderful in Dover." sounds most natural.  Although, having spent some time in DOver I can't ever imagine this being true...

View PostMr Man, on 15 April 2012 - 07:36 PM, said:

Our house is near to my job.
=> OK or workplace?

Workplace
I would just say work - "Our house is near my work" or "Our house is near where I work"

View PostMr Man, on 15 April 2012 - 07:36 PM, said:

I miss you so!
=> Possible or should much be put after so?

So much
"I miss you so much" or "I miss you a lot"

View PostMr Man, on 15 April 2012 - 07:36 PM, said:

My sister has a big apartment in London City.
=> in the city of London?

I would just say in London and leave out city.
As mentioned by another poster, it does depend on whether you are talking about "London" generally or the specific area of London Which is called the "City of London".

If London generally:
My sister has a big apartment in London

If the City of London:
My sister has a big apartment in the City of London

Apart from the specific are of the City of London, London is rarely described in normal conversation as a city.  It's normally just referred to as "London" or the "London area".  Geographically, it is referred to as Greater London although it is also almost never called this in conversation.

Cheers

Rog
"I bet Einstein turned himself all kinds of colours before he invented the lightbulb"

#102 legotrainfan

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 01:36 PM

In the next moment she heard a noise.
=> AT the next moment...?
=> The next moment...?


He took a bath in a magic shower gel. 10 years later he didn't remember the shower gel.
=> Is "remember the shower gel" OK or should it be "remember about". The writer wants to say that he couldn't remember having taken a bath in the magic shower gel.


About wizardry and transformations:
At once the cat was a bird.
=> All out of a sudden the cat was a bird.
=> In an instant the cat was a bird.

I'd use "at once" if no form of "to be" is used.
=> I'll do it at once.
=> I'll phoned her at once.  


One day last year we decided to go to the lake.
=> OK or "on one day last year"?

They noticed they had spoken the spell wrong.
=> had mispronounced the spell?

He answered no.
=> He answered in the negative?

In this night, the two kids left the house. They wanted to see...
=> That night...


You have to cut the tree.
=> Can you use "cut" this way when you want to say that you have to reduce the length of the branches of a tree?


We didn't see the family Williams.
=> We didn't see family Williams?
=> We didn't see the Williams family?


The wizard had to attend a lesson on transfiguration.
=> on transformation?


He said/spoke the spell.
=> Can you say the above sentence? Or would it be better to say: He uttered/read/spoke/said the magic words.


Thanks in advance!

Edited by legotrainfan, 22 April 2012 - 01:37 PM.

[...]
I have spread my dreams under your feet.
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
From: "He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven" by W.B. Yeats


Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#103 Rufus

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 02:07 PM

In the next moment she heard a noise.
'The next moment...', or just 'Next moment...'

He took a bath in a magic shower gel. 10 years later he didn't remember the shower gel.
=> Is "remember the shower gel" OK or should it be "remember about". The writer wants to say that he couldn't remember having taken a bath in the magic shower gel.

I think either is fine. It gets the point across.

At once the cat was a bird.
=> All out of a sudden the cat was a bird.
=> In an instant the cat was a bird.

All of these are fine, except the second should be 'All of a sudden...'.  I'd probably say, 'Suddenly, the cat was a bird.'

I'd use "at once" if no form of "to be" is used.
=> I'll do it at once.
=> I'll phoned her at once.  
:thumbup:

One day last year we decided to go to the lake.
=> OK or "on one day last year"?

Fine as it is.

They noticed they had spoken the spell wrong.
=> had mispronounced the spell?

Yes, or '... had spoken the spell wrongly'.  'Wrong' is often used colloquially in this situation, but its use is actually... wrong.  'Wrong' is an adjective; 'wrongly' an adverb.

He answered no.
=> He answered in the negative?

'in the negative', or, 'He answered, "no".'

In this night, the two kids left the house. They wanted to see...
=> That night...
'That night' (no 'in').

You have to cut the tree.
=> Can you use "cut" this way when you want to say that you have to reduce the length of the branches of a tree?

You can, though 'saw' might be better.

We didn't see the family Williams.
=> We didn't see family Williams?
=> We didn't see the Williams family?

The original, or the last.  We would most likely say, 'the Williams family' in the UK.

The wizard had to attend a lesson on transfiguration.
=> on transformation?

'Transfiguration' seems to be ok in this context.  :look:

He said/spoke the spell.
=> Can you say the above sentence? Or would it be better to say: He uttered/read/spoke/said the magic words.

It's probably ok to say this, but it might be more natural to say, 'He read the spell out.'

#104 Dfenz

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 12:41 AM

With respect to this

"I'd use "at once" if no form of "to be" is used.
=> I'll do it at once.
=> I'll phoned her at once.
"

The 'phoned' should be 'phone' as the future and past tenses are being combined - was it a typo?

Earlier in the thread there was a reference to 'The Big Ben'. As its a name I'd normally drop the 'the' and simply say 'Big Ben'.
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#105 legotrainfan

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 01:52 PM

Thanks for your help, Rufus!

View PostDfenz, on 23 April 2012 - 12:41 AM, said:


The 'phoned' should be 'phone' as the future and past tenses are being combined - was it a typo?

Yes, that was a typo. Maybe I first wanted to write "I phoned her at once." And thanks for telling me that Big Ben is used without the definite article. Most sights require "the" but not all of them. I haven't been able to figure out a rule regarding that matter. I don't even know if there is actually a rule. But you say Big Ben is like a name. Maybe it's because of that.

Edited by legotrainfan, 23 April 2012 - 01:57 PM.

[...]
I have spread my dreams under your feet.
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
From: "He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven" by W.B. Yeats


Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#106 legotrainfan

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 10:25 AM

When you spend a longer time abroad, you learn a language in a natural way.
=> My suggestion: When you spend a longer period of time abroad, you learn a language in an authentic setting.

Only few believe that going abroad is a useless time.
=> A useless period of time? A waste of time? I don't like the indefinite article before "useless time."

Most of them have been at least once on holiday abroad.
=> ...on holiday abroad at least once.

Many people go abroad for special events such as concerts or for visiting museums.
=> to visit museums.

Thanks in advance for your help!
[...]
I have spread my dreams under your feet.
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
From: "He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven" by W.B. Yeats


Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#107 Rufus

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 11:34 AM

View Postlegotrainfan, on 18 May 2012 - 10:25 AM, said:

When you spend a longer time abroad, you learn a language in a natural way.
=> My suggestion: When you spend a longer period of time abroad, you learn a language in an authentic setting.
Both are fine.  The original's meaning is perfectly clear, so there's probably no need to correct it.

Quote

Only few believe that going abroad is a useless time.
=> A useless period of time? A waste of time? I don't like the indefinite article before "useless time."
'A waste of time' would, I think, be best in this context.

Quote

Most of them have been at least once on holiday abroad.
=> ...on holiday abroad at least once.
While the original is perfectly understandable, it sounds awkward, so I'd agree yours is better.

Quote

Many people go abroad for special events such as concerts or for visiting museums.
=> to visit museums.
Your suggestion is grammatically correct; the original probably isn't but might well be how the average Engliah person would say it!

#108 legotrainfan

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 06:35 PM

Thanks for your previous replies, Rufus!

How about these sentences:

I like the air conditioning of this building.
=> air conditioning OR air conditioning system


My brother's leg was broken and he got a gypsum.
=> My version: ...and it was put in plaster.


I rode past the house. ("I" is on a bike.)
=> OK or would you say "I rode my bike past the house"? I assume that either way is perfectly fine (as long as it is clear that "I" is on a bike and not in a car.)


The man rode his bike along Mill Street down to his new villa.
=> I'd cross out "down".
=> Or: ...rode his bike down Mill Street to his new villa.


He saw his sandwich lying in the street.
=> ON, or is both possible?


The animals stood at the other side (of the fence).
=> ON instead of AT


The boy rode down the street by bike.
=> I'd say: The boy rode his bike down the street.

Again, thanks in advance!
[...]
I have spread my dreams under your feet.
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
From: "He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven" by W.B. Yeats


Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#109 Rufus

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 07:40 AM

View Postlegotrainfan, on 20 May 2012 - 06:35 PM, said:

I like the air conditioning of this building.
=> air conditioning OR air conditioning system
I prefer the original - it refers to the effect of the air conditioning rather than the machinery, and it's how we'd say it.

Quote

My brother's leg was broken and he got a gypsum.
=> My version: ...and it was put in plaster.
Your suggestion is better.

Quote

I rode past the house. ("I" is on a bike.)
=> OK or would you say "I rode my bike past the house"? I assume that either way is perfectly fine (as long as it is clear that "I" is on a bike and not in a car.)
As you say, the original is fine, provided the context makes it clear that the writer is riding a bike.

Quote

The man rode his bike along Mill Street down to his new villa.
=> I'd cross out "down".
=> Or: ...rode his bike down Mill Street to his new villa.
The last one is best.

Quote

He saw his sandwich lying in the street.
=> ON, or is both possible?
Either works, but we'd be more likely to say, 'in'

Quote

The animals stood at the other side (of the fence).
=> ON instead of AT
'On'.

Quote

The boy rode down the street by bike.
=> I'd say: The boy rode his bike down the street.
Your suggestion is better.

#110 legotrainfan

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Posted 27 May 2012 - 09:41 AM

Rufus, you should be given an academic title for your editing skills! Thanks for your help!



First, the sorcerer was invisible. Later he was tired. He lay visible on his bed.
=> Is the structure of the bold part correct?


After the lunch we went...
=> Without the


We went on the mountains to find that flower.
=> ...went to the mountains...
=> ... went on a mountain...
=> Or is it OK?


He said,"I'm invisible! How can I change this? Help me to be visible!"
=> become instead of be or OK the way it is?


I got an idea.
=> I had an idea.


They told all their parents.
=> ...told their parents everything.


In the book of the wizard the four friends found a spell on invisibility.
=> Correct preposition? You can cast a spell on someone, but I don't know if on works here.


the name of the book
=> I think it's OK, but I'd say title.


They decided to mix another liquid.
=> OK? The writer wants to say that they made a magic potion.


Thanks in advance!
[...]
I have spread my dreams under your feet.
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
From: "He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven" by W.B. Yeats


Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#111 Mr Man

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Posted 27 May 2012 - 09:49 AM

View Postlegotrainfan, on 27 May 2012 - 09:41 AM, said:

First, the sorcerer was invisible. Later he was tired. He lay visible on his bed.
=> Is the structure of the bold part correct?

Yes it is.

After the lunch we went...
=> Without the

It's better without.

We went on the mountains to find that flower.
=> ...went to the mountains...
=> ... went on a mountain...
=> Or is it OK?

Up a mountain? Out of yours 'went to the mountains' is the best.


He said,"I'm invisible! How can I change this? Help me to be visible!"
=> become instead of be or OK the way it is?


Be visible again, or just 'become visible'

I got an idea.
=> I had an idea.

I had an idea.

They told all their parents.
=> ...told their parents everything.

'told their parents everything'

In the book of the wizard the four friends found a spell on invisibility.
=> Correct preposition? You can cast a spell on someone, but I don't know if on works here.

Of invisibility, would be the best to use.

the name of the book
=> I think it's OK, but I'd say title.

Title would be better, however name is still ok.

They decided to mix another liquid.
=> OK? The writer wants to say that they made a magic potion.

Mix some more liquids? Mix another concoction?

Thanks in advance!

Hope you like it, my answers underlined :classic:.
'For over a thousand generations the Jedi Knights were the guardians of peace and justice in the Old Republic.'
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#112 legotrainfan

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 08:55 PM

Thank you, Mr. Man!



It was a wonderful feeling in the castle.
=> ...feeling TO BE...


My brother would participate again in this competition.
=> Is the position of "again" OK? I think it is. I think you could also put it at the end of the sentence.


She was the first person who started in the contest.
=> OK?


If there is suddenly a panic...
=> Would you leave the indefinite article where it is, or would you cross it out?


More and more Europeans claim...
=> are claiming


The majority of those people are...
=> I'd say is, but I don't know if you can use is and are for majority.


Morality is going back.
=> is declining
=> is on the decline


the unemployment rate is getting higher
=> I'd say is increasing.  


ritual religions
=> religous rites
=> religions with ancient rites
No idea what the writer wants to say! Extremely few hits when you google it.


How would it be with people who are always unemployed?
=> What would it be like with...


to make perfect people (Topic: cloning)
=> Create? Design? Or OK the way it is?


With this scientific method one could...
=> through, with the help of


All this would end with another war.
=> result in


Your clone will look exactly as you want it to be.
=> exactly the way you want


Thanks in advance!
[...]
I have spread my dreams under your feet.
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
From: "He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven" by W.B. Yeats


Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#113 Rufus

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 10:03 PM

View Postlegotrainfan, on 03 June 2012 - 08:55 PM, said:

It was a wonderful feeling in the castle.
=> ...feeling TO BE...
Agreed.

View Postlegotrainfan, on 03 June 2012 - 08:55 PM, said:

My brother would participate again in this competition.
=> Is the position of "again" OK? I think it is. I think you could also put it at the end of the sentence.
Either is fine.

View Postlegotrainfan, on 03 June 2012 - 08:55 PM, said:

She was the first person who started in the contest.
=> OK?
I'm not sure what this is saying; 'She was the first person to start in the contest' might be better.

View Postlegotrainfan, on 03 June 2012 - 08:55 PM, said:

If there is suddenly a panic...
=> Would you leave the indefinite article where it is, or would you cross it out?
This is understandable, and would be how most English people would say it.  Technically, 'panic' is an abstract noun like 'fear' so shouldn't have the article, but I think it sounds clumsy without it.  You would have to say, 'If, suddenly, there is panic...'

View Postlegotrainfan, on 03 June 2012 - 08:55 PM, said:

More and more Europeans claim...
=> are claiming
I think this might be ok, depending on the context.   For most uses, 'are claiming' is better.

View Postlegotrainfan, on 03 June 2012 - 08:55 PM, said:

The majority of those people are...
=> I'd say is, but I don't know if you can use is and are for majority.
'Majority' is singular, so it should be 'is'

View Postlegotrainfan, on 03 June 2012 - 08:55 PM, said:

Morality is going back.
=> is declining
=> is on the decline
Either of yours.  Unless someone called 'Morality' is returning whence she came!  :laugh:

View Postlegotrainfan, on 03 June 2012 - 08:55 PM, said:

the unemployment rate is getting higher
=> I'd say is increasing.  
The original is ok, but 'is increasing' is better.

View Postlegotrainfan, on 03 June 2012 - 08:55 PM, said:

ritual religions
=> religous rites
=> religions with ancient rites
No idea what the writer wants to say! Extremely few hits when you google it.
:def_shrug:  Your guess is as good as mine!  :laugh:

View Postlegotrainfan, on 03 June 2012 - 08:55 PM, said:

How would it be with people who are always unemployed?
=> What would it be like with...
I think the problem is the word 'with'.  Replace it with 'for', and either works.   Unless, that is, you are talking about (for example) a play featuring a cast of unemployed people, or something like that.  :blush:

View Postlegotrainfan, on 03 June 2012 - 08:55 PM, said:

to make perfect people (Topic: cloning)
=> Create? Design? Or OK the way it is?
I think 'make' is fine in this context, though 'create' is probably better.

View Postlegotrainfan, on 03 June 2012 - 08:55 PM, said:

With this scientific method one could...
=> through, with the help of
'With' works, but it's casual.  'Through' or 'using' would be better.

View Postlegotrainfan, on 03 June 2012 - 08:55 PM, said:

All this would end with another war.
=> result in
Again, the original works, as does 'result in' or 'end in'.

View Postlegotrainfan, on 03 June 2012 - 08:55 PM, said:

Your clone will look exactly as you want it to be.
=> exactly the way you want
The problem is the verb 'to be' at the end, which should be 'to look'; then, either the original or yours would work.

#114 legotrainfan

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 05:37 PM

Thanks, Rufus!


The people who live there are happy.
=> With or without the?


He decided to drink two beers.
=> beer or beers?


They made drinking alcohol to their lifestyle.
=> They made drinking alcohol part of their lifestyle.


They have been socially forced to behave that way.
=> Sounds strange.
=> Society has forced them to behave...?


This is playing more and more a big role.
=> This is playing a more and more important role.


This can be done to make women and their husbands happy parents.
=> OK?


Such students could be preferred more than others.
=> OK or more often than others?


They tried to get some good work.
=> ...a good job.


All of them look and behave same.
=> All of them look the same and behave the same way.


He thinks that in each topic there are pros and cons.
=> ...for each topic there are...
=> ...for each matter there are...


I didn't have a big choice how to spend my money.
=> ...many choices of how to...
[...]
I have spread my dreams under your feet.
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
From: "He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven" by W.B. Yeats


Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#115 Mr Man

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 06:48 PM

View Postlegotrainfan, on 09 June 2012 - 05:37 PM, said:

The people who live there are happy.
=> With or without the?

If it's a specific group keep the 'the', if it's a general group, lose the 'the'.

He decided to drink two beers.
=> beer or beers?

Beers

They made drinking alcohol to their lifestyle.
=> They made drinking alcohol part of their lifestyle.

The second one.

They have been socially forced to behave that way.
=> Sounds strange.
=> Society has forced them to behave...?

The second one sounds better but the first also makes sense.

This is playing more and more a big role.
=> This is playing a more and more important role.


This can be done to make women and their husbands happy parents.
=> OK?

This can be done to make 'them' happy parents? What is it in this case that will do so?

Such students could be preferred more than others.
=> OK or more often than others?

either, but change the could be to may be.

They tried to get some good work.
=> ...a good job.

A good job.

All of them look and behave same.
=> All of them look the same and behave the same way.

The same or the same way.

He thinks that in each topic there are pros and cons.
=> ...for each topic there are...
=> ...for each matter there are...

for each matter

I didn't have a big choice how to spend my money.
=> ...many choices of how to...

many choices

My responses in bold.
'For over a thousand generations the Jedi Knights were the guardians of peace and justice in the Old Republic.'
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#116 legotrainfan

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 03:19 PM

Thanks, Mr Man!!



At dinner we ate chicken.
=> Is the preposition OK?


I went to a zoo where many animals are.
=> ...where there are many animals?


I've been in the UK for 2 days with my family.
=> ...in the UK with my family for 2 days?


Or a similar case:
I'm on holiday in England with my cousin.
=> Correct word order?


I went to London to the Tower Bridge.
=> Sounds odd! Better: ...to London to see the Tower Bridge.
=> Or: ...to the Tower Bridge in London.


He has seen a lot of the sights here.
=> I'd cross out the definite article.


Someone who is abroad emails his friend to share his experiences:
For only one day it rained.
=> I'd say: (So far) it has rained for only one day.
=> Or: Since I came here, it has rained for only one day.


It's so wonderful here. I travelled all around.
=> ...all around the country.


In the next week I will...
=> I'd just say: Next week I will...


The most people of Canada speak English.
=> Sounds strange. Better: Most people in Canada speak English.


After swimming he took his clothes from the beach.
=> ...picked up his clothes from the beach?


The surfer took the next wave.
=> ...rode on the next wave? Or can you say took in this context?


I am now in England.
=> I am in England now.


Thanks in advance!

Edited by legotrainfan, 17 June 2012 - 03:21 PM.

[...]
I have spread my dreams under your feet.
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
From: "He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven" by W.B. Yeats


Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#117 Mr Man

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 06:58 PM

View Postlegotrainfan, on 17 June 2012 - 03:19 PM, said:

At dinner we ate chicken.
=> Is the preposition OK?

Yes that works :classic:.

I went to a zoo where many animals are.
=> ...where there are many animals?

Where there are many animals.

I've been in the UK for 2 days with my family.
=> ...in the UK with my family for 2 days?

The second one.

Or a similar case:
I'm on holiday in England with my cousin.
=> Correct word order?

Yes it reads fine

I went to London to the Tower Bridge.
=> Sounds odd! Better: ...to London to see the Tower Bridge.
=> Or: ...to the Tower Bridge in London.

The first suggestion, 'I went to London to see the Tower Bridge'.

He has seen a lot of the sights here.
=> I'd cross out the definite article.

Crossing it out would help but it still reads OK with the 'the' in it.

Someone who is abroad emails his friend to share his experiences:
For only one day it rained.
=> I'd say: (So far) it has rained for only one day.
=> Or: Since I came here, it has rained for only one day.

Either of the two are fine.

It's so wonderful here. I travelled all around.
=> ...all around the country.

Depends where you traveled 'the country', the city'.

In the next week I will...
=> I'd just say: Next week I will...

The second one.

The most people of Canada speak English.
=> Sounds strange. Better: Most people in Canada speak English.

Yes the second one makes sense.

After swimming he took his clothes from the beach.
=> ...picked up his clothes from the beach?

Either of the two are fine.

The surfer took the next wave.
=> ...rode on the next wave? Or can you say took in this context?

It depends on how a surfer thinks of a wave, but for me I would say 'rode the next wave'.

I am now in England.
=> I am in England now.

The first one sounds more natural.

:classic:
'For over a thousand generations the Jedi Knights were the guardians of peace and justice in the Old Republic.'
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#118 legotrainfan

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 03:22 PM

Thanks, Mr Man!!


Further unclarities:


the lake in that we swam
=> in which?


Last holidays we went to South America.
=> during the last holidays?
=> in the last holidays?
=> OK the way it is?


I went to the seats of the football stadium to watch the football match. Then I ate popcorn at my place.
=> Then I sat on my seat eating popcorn?


She was swimming. Suddenly she went down. (Here the writer wants to say that she nearly drowned.)
=> Suddenly she disappeared from the surface of the water?
=> ...disappeared in the water?


Since then she likes going there every time she can.
=> Tough sentence to correct! My suggestion: Since then she has liked going there as often as she has been able to.

Edited by legotrainfan, 23 June 2012 - 06:27 PM.

[...]
I have spread my dreams under your feet.
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
From: "He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven" by W.B. Yeats


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#119 Mr Man

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 08:12 PM

View Postlegotrainfan, on 23 June 2012 - 03:22 PM, said:

the lake in that we swam
=> in which?

In which.

Last holidays we went to South America.
=> during the last holidays?
=> in the last holidays?
=> OK the way it is?

OK the way it is.

I went to the seats of the football stadium to watch the football match. Then I ate popcorn at my place.
=> Then I sat on my seat eating popcorn?

Then I sat on my seat eating popcorn.

She was swimming. Suddenly she went down. (Here the writer wants to say that she nearly drowned.)
=> Suddenly she disappeared from the surface of the water?
=> ...disappeared in the water?

Went down sounds fine.

Since then she likes going there every time she can.
=> Tough sentence to correct! My suggestion: Since then she has liked going there as often as she has been able to.

Since then she likes going there every opportunity she can, or as often as she can.


'For over a thousand generations the Jedi Knights were the guardians of peace and justice in the Old Republic.'
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#120 legotrainfan

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Posted 11 July 2012 - 08:56 PM

Thanks for your replies, Mr. Man!

What would you say?
=> I'll wait downstairs for you.
=> I'll wait for you downstairs.


Strange that Rufus hasn't responded to my questions for a while. Of course, I'm perfectly satisfied with Mr. Man's replies. However, I thought Rufus liked this thread.

Edited by legotrainfan, 11 July 2012 - 08:58 PM.

[...]
I have spread my dreams under your feet.
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
From: "He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven" by W.B. Yeats


Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#121 Mr Man

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 10:13 AM

View Postlegotrainfan, on 11 July 2012 - 08:56 PM, said:

Thanks for your replies, Mr. Man!

What would you say?
=> I'll wait downstairs for you.
=> I'll wait for you downstairs.


Strange that Rufus hasn't responded to my questions for a while. Of course, I'm perfectly satisfied with Mr. Man's replies. However, I thought Rufus liked this thread.

Oh both sound fine, the second sounds a tad more natural though.

You are... good :tongue:.
'For over a thousand generations the Jedi Knights were the guardians of peace and justice in the Old Republic.'
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#122 legotrainfan

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 01:32 PM

What would you say?

He had an accident last week. His leg is broken.
a) I wonder if he needs help. I'll phone him this evening.
b) I am wondering if he needs....

In that particular context I'd prefer b). However, I believe it works either way (wonder AND am wondering, whichever you prefer). I think you could also say:
c) I have been wondering if...
d) I have wondered if...


Would you say:

a) While I am waiting for the letter, I am keeping myself occupied.
b) While I am waiting for the letter, I keep myself occupied.

Here I'd say it's a). However, I've seen similar constructions where the present simple was used in combination with the present progressive:

I am watching TV while she does the laundry.
Why isn't it she is doing? That's what I'd say.


I am looking forward to your replies!
[...]
I have spread my dreams under your feet.
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
From: "He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven" by W.B. Yeats


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#123 Rufus

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 02:50 PM

View Postlegotrainfan, on 11 July 2012 - 08:56 PM, said:

Strange that Rufus hasn't responded to my questions for a while. Of course, I'm perfectly satisfied with Mr. Man's replies. However, I thought Rufus liked this thread.
I still do!  :sweet:

View Postlegotrainfan, on 15 September 2012 - 01:32 PM, said:

What would you say?

He had an accident last week. His leg is broken.
a) I wonder if he needs help. I'll phone him this evening.
b) I am wondering if he needs....

In that particular context I'd prefer b). However, I believe it works either way (wonder AND am wondering, whichever you prefer). I think you could also say:
c) I have been wondering if...
d) I have wondered if...
I actually think (a) works better in this context.  Both are correct, but (a) is more immediate.  (d) doesn't really work; © is okay but sounds a little clumsy.

View Postlegotrainfan, on 15 September 2012 - 01:32 PM, said:

Would you say:

a) While I am waiting for the letter, I am keeping myself occupied.
b) While I am waiting for the letter, I keep myself occupied.

Here I'd say it's a). However, I've seen similar constructions where the present simple was used in combination with the present progressive:

I am watching TV while she does the laundry.
Why isn't it she is doing? That's what I'd say.
Wow.  You've really got down to the subtle nuances of the English language.

I think all of these are correct, or at least acceptable; which one you choose really depends on the context and what you mean to imply by the statement.  

Looking at the first part, both options are correct; you could also say, 'While I am waiting for the letter, I will keep myself occupied.'  If you chose option (a), I would suggest omitting the first 'I am'.  Whilst it is correct, (b) sounds a little odd to me, but could be used to emphasise the word 'keep' as in 'While I am waiting for the [dreaded] letter, I keep myself occupied [despite my anxiety].'

For the second part, the juxtaposition of present and present continuous tenses adds a nuance to the respective actions; for example, I am lazy for watching TV whilst she is industrious and responsible for doing the laundry.  Of course, this is subjective and dependent on context.

#124 legotrainfan

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 07:26 PM

Thanks Rufus!


Talking about a trip through England:

a) In the last four days we went to Birmingham.

b) On the last four days we went...

c) The last four days we went...

Which one is the correct preposition? I'd say it's version B.
[...]
I have spread my dreams under your feet.
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
From: "He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven" by W.B. Yeats


Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#125 Mr Man

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 07:27 PM

View Postlegotrainfan, on 01 October 2012 - 07:26 PM, said:

Talking about a trip through England:

a) In the last four days we went to Birmingham.

b) On the last four days we went...

c) The last four days we went...

Which one is the correct preposition? I'd say it's version B.

It's is B.
I wouldn't though :tongue:.
'For over a thousand generations the Jedi Knights were the guardians of peace and justice in the Old Republic.'
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