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LEGO Train Wheels and Couplers


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#1 Sir E Fullner

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Posted 19 September 2010 - 02:58 AM

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At my home, I have a few train car bases and I really want to know:

Where could I get extra train wheels and buffers?

Please discuss whatever you know on where to get them cheaply and post it below.

Always entertaining, always wondering, always:

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#2 Flalex72

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Posted 19 September 2010 - 03:47 AM

 efullner, on 19 September 2010 - 02:58 AM, said:

At my home, I have a few train car bases and I really want to know:

Where could I get extra train wheels and buffers?

Please discuss whatever you know on where to get them cheaply and post it below.

Always entertaining, always wondering, always:

Pick a Brick has both wheels and buffers in a few types.
www.shop.lego.com/pab

#3 peterab

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Posted 19 September 2010 - 06:25 AM

 Flalex72, on 19 September 2010 - 03:47 AM, said:

Pick a Brick has both wheels and buffers in a few types.
www.shop.lego.com/pab

House of Logos on Bricklink http://www.bricklink...?p=HouseOfLogos has all the parts slightly cheaper than PAB and they are in the US so the shipping should be OK.

It does strike me that both these places are the obvious places to look and the original poster should have done a little searching himself instead of starting this topic though.

#4 Sir E Fullner

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Posted 20 September 2010 - 04:35 PM

 peterab, on 19 September 2010 - 06:25 AM, said:

House of Logos on Bricklink http://www.bricklink...?p=HouseOfLogos has all the parts slightly cheaper than PAB and they are in the US so the shipping should be OK.

Thanks, I will try the Bricklink shop for the parts.

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#5 andythenorth

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Posted 20 September 2010 - 08:29 PM

You can always see the cheapest stores on bricklink for any part.  Also for train wheels, there are two similar parts, they are identical in function and size:

http://www.bricklink...=233&colorID=11
http://www.bricklink...4880&colorID=11

(also available in grey)
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#6 domboy

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 07:59 PM

 andythenorth, on 20 September 2010 - 08:29 PM, said:

You can always see the cheapest stores on bricklink for any part.  Also for train wheels, there are two similar parts, they are identical in function and size:

http://www.bricklink...=233&colorID=11
http://www.bricklink...4880&colorID=11

(also available in grey)

Sorry to bring back an old topic, but I have an additional question... is there any difference in the above parts mention aesthetically speaking? The links take me to:

2878c01 Black Train Wheel Pair, Complete Assembly
2878c02 Black Train Wheel RC Pair, Complete Assembly

The Bricklink pictures look more or less the same, but not having examples of both in hand I'm not completely sure.

Basically I want to know, if buying parts to assemble rolling stock sets (example My Own Train sets), is there any reason to go for the original part over the newer one? Or should I just base it on part price or availability? And can they be mixed without looking funny?

My apologies if this is a no-brainer... I'm rather new to Lego trains...

#7 jaster

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 12:13 AM

Build your own couplers and buffers http://www.flickr.co.../in/photostream

EDIT: oops, I just realized that his topic had been brought back from the dead!

Edited by jaster, 08 June 2011 - 12:14 AM.

North American trains have knuckle couplers to keep their PH from changing. They don't need buffers!

#8 peterab

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 06:50 AM

 domboy, on 07 June 2011 - 07:59 PM, said:

Sorry to bring back an old topic, but I have an additional question... is there any difference in the above parts mention aesthetically speaking? The links take me to:

The difference is the 9V axle goes all the way through the plastic wheel, and has a pointed end, whereas the RC axle sits in the wheel, the pointed end being a part of the wheel. No real visible difference.

#9 Snapshot

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 07:42 AM

 peterab, on 08 June 2011 - 06:50 AM, said:

The difference is the 9V axle goes all the way through the plastic wheel, and has a pointed end, whereas the RC axle sits in the wheel, the pointed end being a part of the wheel. No real visible difference.
No visible difference but I find the newer ones roll more freely and the wheels are able to rotate independently so should be better in curves.

#10 domboy

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 01:05 PM

I really appreciate the responses guys, you've been most helpful in answering my question.

 jaster, on 08 June 2011 - 12:13 AM, said:

Build your own couplers and buffers http://www.flickr.co.../in/photostream

EDIT: oops, I just realized that his topic had been brought back from the dead!
Yeah, sorry about that. But it seem more appropriate to bring this topic back rather than starting a new one since my question built on what the original poster had asked.

#11 jaster

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 07:22 PM

 peterab, on 08 June 2011 - 06:50 AM, said:

The difference is the 9V axle goes all the way through the plastic wheel, and has a pointed end, whereas the RC axle sits in the wheel, the pointed end being a part of the wheel. No real visible difference.

The RC wheels create a lot more friction than 9V wheels, apparently.
North American trains have knuckle couplers to keep their PH from changing. They don't need buffers!

#12 hoeij

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 01:27 AM

 jaster, on 08 June 2011 - 07:22 PM, said:

The RC wheels create a lot more friction than 9V wheels, apparently.
Only the ones with the technic axle and technic bricks.  The other wheels in the RC train sets are good.

#13 peterab

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 02:50 AM

 Snapshot, on 08 June 2011 - 07:42 AM, said:

No visible difference but I find the newer ones roll more freely and the wheels are able to rotate independently so should be better in curves.

I'm a bit surprised by this. My newer 9V wheel sets roll as well, if not better than my PF ones. They do tend to wear with use and roll less freely, but I'd imagine the PF wheels will wear out eventually too.

Anybody else have any observations on if 9V and PF wheel sets differ?



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