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Starting out on 12V trains


33 replies to this topic

#26 Beej

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 04:55 AM

The track ends don't need to be connected for the train to work. If you want a track like this -------- there is no problem. It is the motor that creates the loop in the circuit, not the rails.  :wink:

So if you wanted to run one or two trains back and forwards along the one piece of track that's fine. If you have signals you can place one at red at each end to stop the trains from running off the end of the tracks. That way you don't have to watch it constantly. Or if you don't have signals you can just leave off a few of the inner electric tracks before the ends so the train stops in time.

You can even put a set of points at one end or both ends so you can run one train in one direction, then another train back the other way.

track.JPG

#27 AFOL12v

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 07:31 AM

In this way the train has always be controlled. If you make a circle, then you don't have to look after it.

#28 Olog

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 12:54 PM

Thank you all for your suggestions!

Beej, Panda, good ideas and thanks for the clarification. Now I'll have to thing of a way to get some extra 12V rails to make it a complete loop, since I'm not too keen on keeping an eye on the layout all the time and make sure to turn the trains the other way.

Also, this thread has 1337 views at this moment >_>


Edit: I have a new question! I just realized I'm missing one crucial element for 12V ...Rims! I have no rubber rims to put on the wheels. I was looking around BL last night for these, and I was wondering if there is any way to buy replacements? make my own? maybe there's someone who makes these rims?

Edited by Olog, 05 September 2009 - 01:06 PM.


#29 aawsum

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 01:15 PM

View PostOlog, on Sep 5 2009, 01:54 PM, said:

Edit: I have a new question! I just realized I'm missing one crucial element for 12V ...Rims! I have no rubber rims to put on the wheels. I was looking around BL last night for these, and I was wondering if there is any way to buy replacements? make my own? maybe there's someone who makes these rims?
There is this guy in Belgium who creates these rims
http://users.telenet...reinbandjes.htm

#30 AFOL12v

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 01:29 PM

I dunno if it's the same guy, but these are even better then original ones. I use them for 5 years, while original ones are worn off after 2 years.

Replacemants 12v rims in dutch ebay.

#31 missouri_bb63

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Posted 06 September 2009 - 08:53 AM

I grew up with 12 Volt and I can definitely understand your interest in having all the controls that came with it. My brother had 9V and I never managed to get into it in the same way.
The drawbacks that people have posted here are correct as far as the maintenance and reliability is concerned. I also found the 12V track to be very fragile after years of being clipped on and off the sleepers and need to be replaced regularly which will get expensive too. The clips on the sleepers are equally fragile. When buying motors you should also check to see if they have the rubber o-rings for the wheels and what condition they are in. After a while they dry out and break.

If you are not intending on having a large layout with lots of trains, the general maintenance isn't an issue however. Of course I must warn you, that once you have started it is really addictive. It will turn out to be a very expensive hobby... but a fun one  :classic:.

Of course 12V is only going to get more expensive, so if that is what you really want, you should start now. I am guessing you have already done so, but if not you should look into regional adds in newspapers or regional websites other than eBay or BL to get cheaper prices. Price is controlled by demand and with eBay and BL being in a global market, and with many shops being in countries with higher average wages than yours, it will push up the prices in your local BL/eBay stores too. Your local BL and eBay stores have to get their parts from somewhere and make a descent profit so have a look around. Check out the adds in your neighboring countries as well.

Personally, assuming that once you start building you won't be able to stop, I would go for 9V or PF. If you never start with the 12V controls, I don't think you'll miss them and like others have mentioned, there are ways of making your own. You can find a good summary of the Pros and Cons here

Good luck! I am looking forward to seeing you first layout what ever it turns out to be.

Edited by missouri_bb63, 06 September 2009 - 11:06 PM.


#32 AFOL12v

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Posted 06 September 2009 - 09:39 AM

View Postmissouri_bb63, on Sep 6 2009, 10:53 AM, said:

When buying motors you should also check to see if they have the rubber o-rings for the wheels and what condition they are in. After a while they dry out and break.

View PostPanda9001100, on Sep 5 2009, 03:29 PM, said:

I dunno if it's the same guy, but these are even better then original ones. I use them for 5 years, while original ones are worn off after 2 years.

Replacemants 12v rims in dutch ebay.

Replacements are better then original ones. And originals ones are dried out after one year of use, garantied. I don't care if those original ones are dried out, I replace them nevertheless :devil: .

Edited by Panda9001100, 06 September 2009 - 09:40 AM.


#33 gary_sabol

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Posted 16 September 2009 - 02:32 AM

View PostAMuller396, on May 13 2009, 04:11 PM, said:

I live in the US and have been in love with the 12V system for a long long time.

I don't mean to hijack this thread but how do you get the 12V system to work in the US? Isn't it a 220V system? How does that convert to the 110V US standard?

I have always used the 9V train system but love some of the features of the 12V system, in particular the electronic crossing signals.

If anyone has any information on how to use the 12V system in the US, I'd love to know how.

Thanks!

Gary

#34 FreeBee

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Posted 17 September 2009 - 12:48 AM

Or use this.
Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image



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