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Clone Brick Train Brands


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#151 Locomotive Annie

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 12:27 PM

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Locomotive Annie clearly want's a running train layout that looks like her prototype. She uses anything that helps her meet that goal.

You betcha life I do   :grin:

Seriously though I love the challenge of making bricks, tiles and plates end up looking like a specific type of locomotive.  It's just that if a clone maker has a particular kind useful double sided brick or some other part that Lego doesn't make that finishes off a loco MOC just how I want I'd be nuts not to use it.  Same goes for using a razor saw and hi-tech plastic glue to make a custom part for one of my locos.  When I do this I saw up clone bricks though; - not a crime to saw up clone bricks in my book.  True wrought Lego always stays pristine.
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#152 twenty6twelve

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 10:44 PM

 peterab, on 28 November 2012 - 06:24 AM, said:

I have to agree with Thorsten on this. While I'm pretty purist myself, it all depends what you want to get out of the hobby. Locomotive Annie clearly want's a running train layout that looks like her prototype. She uses anything that helps her meet that goal. I find the challenge of building out of pure LEGO is part of the fun, and I've seen the bar slowly rising on the level of detail we can achieve modeling real prototypes, but clearly there is a limit.

With this I wholeheartedly agree. I admire Annie's use of Lego as a modeling material rather than an exclusive medium, and part of me wishes I was something less of a purist so that I might do the same! We've made strides upon strides of improvement with trains over the past decade and I hope to see that continue, whether it be in the 'purest' form or something that pursues greater liberty to the use of the Lego brick. :classic:

Now if only I can get over myself and stop being such a brand-whore.. :blush:

#153 The Dutch Guy

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 08:52 AM

I guess i am an purist too. I have seen other brands too, but never got myself over and buying them. There is always something there that buggs me, don't know what that is. I realy like the freight train from BanBao, but is also costs about 100 Euro here in Holland and i don't like the battery holder/bottom plate from the BanBao locomotive. If i had the building instructions (tried to look for it on Internet, but could not find a good one) i would try to build this engine with Lego bricks (almost put original Lego there). The Enlighten sets look good, but can't be bought in Holland, only ordered in the US, that would mean al lot of shipping costs. Allthough i am not against other brands to enrich my train (or city) collection, i just does not seem abel to do so.
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#154 Locomotive Annie

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 09:18 AM

 The Dutch Guy, on 29 November 2012 - 08:52 AM, said:

I guess i am an purist too. I have seen other brands too, but never got myself over and buying them. There is always something there that buggs me, don't know what that is. I realy like the freight train from BanBao, but is also costs about 100 Euro here in Holland and i don't like the battery holder/bottom plate from the BanBao locomotive. If i had the building instructions (tried to look for it on Internet, but could not find a good one) i would try to build this engine with Lego bricks (almost put original Lego there). The Enlighten sets look good, but can't be bought in Holland, only ordered in the US, that would mean al lot of shipping costs. Allthough i am not against other brands to enrich my train (or city) collection, i just does not seem abel to do so.

Wow!  100 Euro!  That is expensive for the Freight set, - I'll never complain about the price for one here in New Zealand again.  I really do need to finish writing up my reveiw, but I will say that the main train plate and battery box holder is an area that I'm not so keen on either.  Building the loco itself was a lot of fun and the way it assembles is a great piece of design that makes for a very strong loco.  Based as it is on a genuine prototype,- the HXD2 from the 'Harmony' series of Chinese locomotives built in conjunction with the French company Alstom, - the Banbao version faithfully copies a good many of the prototype's distinctive details, BUT the use of that particular bottom plate and battery box assembly does knock its appearance somewhat.  That said I do like the Banbao loco a lot and I have a second set on layby so I can run two together in a lashup configuration.

I have a good quality scanner so I can very easily take a scan of the Freight loco's instruction booklet and post a link to it if anyone else wants to do a build in Lego Bricks.
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#155 Frank STENGEL

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 03:24 PM

 The Dutch Guy, on 29 November 2012 - 08:52 AM, said:

The Enlighten sets look good, but can't be bought in Holland, only ordered in the US, that would mean al lot of shipping costs.

Actually, one can order them from China via ebay. I always had at least one shop which would ship for free. Simply ask/search for "Enlighten Train" and you will have quite a few choices in the buy me now section...

#156 Locomotive Annie

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 01:01 PM

All the best for the New Year everyone.  I promised a review of the Banbao freight set and I must apologise for that not happening only I've been ill again and I spent Christmas and New Year not being very well at all.  Now I'm feeling better and I'm on the mend I thought I'd make an effort to give you all my thoughts on the Freight Set, - perhaps not the full review I intended, but at least I can give you the main points about owning and assembling the set.

First of all I'm not a great photographer so I'll point you to this Brickshelf link where you can find plenty of nice clear photos of the Freight Set and its components:  http://www.brickshel...ry.cgi?f=498205  These are definitely not my photos and many thanks to Buzzard for making them available as a resource to the brick train building community.

As I mentioned in an earlier post the loco in this set seems to be based on the HXD2 from the 'Harmony' series of Chinese locomotives built in conjunction with the French company Alstom.  The Banbao version does a reasonable job of representing many of the prototype's distinctive features and overall I liked the set well enough to order a second set so I could have another Freight loco to run in a lashup with my first one.  There are some shortcomings with the Banbao loco though and I will outline those as I go along.

The set is packed in a sizeable cardboard box which is nice and sturdy and does a good job of protecting the contents.  Inside the box all the set parts and the instructions can be found in two slide out cardboard trays.  One of the trays has the loco base tidily tied in place to prevent it from being damaged and it also has a small compartment which contains the motor block again to prevent it from being damaged.  All the parts are packed in plastic bags as is usual with most brick sets, but I can tell you from experience that Banbao doesn't believe in having the parts for each of the main items of the set in their own separate bags.  I don't know what system they use to fill the bags, but I think it has more to do with chaos theory than any logical method that I could discover.  All the track was tidily packed in their own bags however, so there must be some logic operating somewhere I suppose.

The set has four main parts not counting the track; the locomotive, its r/c gear and motor block; a cargo box wagon that looks more like some kind of power car to me with the all the parts representing the electrical gubbins for an overhead power pickup on its roof; a highside gondola and a small green truck with a tipping tray.  My set contained the new Banbao 'Tobee' figures instead of minifigs and I'm still not sure what I think of these.  They certainly would appeal to children though and I will comment that the whole set is very much about having a high play value.

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(From left to right; A Banbao 'minifig', the five 'Tobees' in the set and at the end with the spanner 'Olivia' from the 'Friends' series.)

There are four instruction booklets provided, one for each of the main brick built items in the set.  These booklets follow the trend of being  non-lingual and use very good large clear illustrations of each stage of assembly.  I found these instruction booklets very easy to follow and I was never left in any doubt as to how to it the bricks together.  At the back of the instruction booklet for the loco there are two pages of diagrams and written instructions for the remote control unit which are clear and easy to follow.
A sticker sheet is included and I'm afraid I didn't like the majority of the stickers.  Unfortunately some Chinese makers have a tendency to over-sticker their products and their attempts at English wording that actually makes much sense are very much lacking.  I'm going to leave most of the stickers off my set and only make use of the bare few essential ones.

So what was it like to put the set together?  When I was still into brick wargaming before I decided that I didn't want have anything to do with war anymore I'd purchased a few Banbao military sets, mainly their tanks and helicopters.  Overall I liked these Banbao sets well enough at the time to overlook their faults, so I  was expecting to have problems with brick clutch and the lack of it with this freight loco set.  Was I ever in for a surprise because the bricks just went together so beautifully and stayed where I put them without any problems at all.  Comparing the bricks in the freight loco set with some of the older bricks I had from the military sets it looks very much as if Banbao is using new moulds and possibly a different grade of plastic these days.  The ends of the studs now have a new trademark symbol on them that wasn't present on the older bricks and the way these new bricks pushed together was just so different to what I'd experienced before with a Banbao set.  The bricks themselves were all cleanly formed with no trace of flash and I would say that their quality is now very close to LEGO.  For those of you who don't know Banbao bricks are taller in height than LEGO and the studs on Banbao bricks are taller as well.  The two different makes can be made to work together Ok though once the size ratio between them is figured out.  Some of my military models were built using both kinds of bricks and they worked out just fine.

I really enjoyed building up this set and I had a lot of fun for my money even before I got to playing trains.

The Locomotive:
The Banbao design for the freight loco makes for a strong structure than can be readily handled without losing bits.  It has four chunky brickbuilt opening doors, two at each end, that pivot on very stout hinges.  At the front of the loco there is a crew compartment with seats behind the driver's compartment where either Minifigs or Tobees can ride, BUT unfortunately there is no way to get a driver figure into the driver's compartment without major surgery.  Tobees don't fit at all even if you take their legs off and Minifigs will only fit if you take their legs and hands off and stick them in with Blu-tac.  Not good Banbao.
The base on which the loco is built does its job alright and it was straight and true with no warping, though i have to say I don't like its design which makes the housing for the r/c receiver a full six wide so it has to form part of the loco bodyside.  I don't like having a large grey rectangle on the blue and white bodyside of the loco and I'll most probably devise some kind of custom sticker to cover the thing up.
Banbao wheels and motor blocks are a little taller than LEGO ones which is fine, only it makes trying to fit a LEGO motor block difficult, but I can't say that I've really had a decent go at doing this just yet.  The bottom plate on my loco's motor block wasn't fitted on quite right when I unpacked it, but otherwise it was fine once I refitted it.  The motor block looks quite Ok and serviceable inside (see pictures on Buzzard's Brickshelf) and I'll be interested to see how it works out once it starts earning its keep.  The driving wheels are fitted with rubber traction tyres btw.
One big moan is that the wiring and connector plug between the r/c receiver and the motor block is decidedly lightweight and likely to cause problems if not handled carefully.  This would have to be the loco's Achilles heel and for something that's supposed to be a children's toy likely to be a constant source of trouble.
Couplings are sealed magnetic ones that are nice and strong and seem to work just fine with LEGO and Enlighten couplings.
The radio control isn't especially powerful and it pays not to wander too far away when driving a Banbao loco.  Controls have a deadman's effect in that you have to keep your finger on the button to keep the train moving, so if you get out of range the loco will just stop.  There are three channels so up to three different trains can be run on the same layout.  Controls consist of a forward and a reverse button as well as a speed control button that's supposed to make the train run faster when you push it, but it doesn't and really it's just another forward button.  Don't use the so-called 'music' button ever because it starts the most awful generic train sound effects you've ever heard.


The Cargo Box Wagon/Power car:
I had no problems with this as it went together exactly according to the instructions.  I had one brick that seemed to be a little loose when assembling the underframe, but after a bit of fiddling it behaved itself and stayed put.  The only other moan I have is that the sliding doors had moulding marks on them that couldn't be resolved by turning them to the inside because being handed one door was always left showing off it's moulding marks.  They're not blindingly obvious, but it is a little disappointing.
Lots of play value with being able to load and unload this wagon via the sliding doors and there are hinged doors at one end for a guard to hang out of so he can blow his whistle, wave green flags & etc.

The Gondola:
Again this went together according to the instructions without any problems.  A feature of this wagon is that there are two large hinged doors on each side that open so the gondola can be loaded and unloaded.  A good sized handful of 1x1 cylindrical grey bricks are provided in the set as a load for the gondola as well as a Tobee sized pick and a shovel to give the wee folk in this set something to do.  There are two small compartments one each side at one end of the gondola with hinged doors for carrying extra tools, chains, Tobee lunches or whatever as well.
Something I found very peculiar was that at one end of the gondola there was a recessed glass door/window.  The loco and the cargo box wagon have them too and they seem to be there to represent corridor connections which is fine for them, but I have yet to see a gondola with a corridor connection!

The Little Green Truck:
A strangely cute, but slightly ugly little truck is provided in the set to help haul away goods delivered by the train or else bring freight to the railhead.  With the set there are three largish sacks, two drums and a jerry can as well as the 1x1 grey bricks for the gondola load.  Clips are provided on either side of the truck's tip tray to carry the pick and shovel which adds to the play value, but unfortunately the wee truck is so small that it's hard pressed to carry very much at all.  Two of the sacks stacked one on top of the other is about the limit and I haven't tried to see how many of the gondola's 1x1 brick load I can get into the tray before it all comes spilling over the sides.
Another strange thing is that the truck has no seats and the driver has to sit on the floor.  They do get a steering wheel though, so I suppose I should be grateful for that.
Three other odd accessories that come with this set are two dogs and a cat.  I'm not sure why they are in the set, but I'm sure the kiddies like to see them there.

Track:
You get 18 curves, 8 straights, a RH point/switch and a LH point/switch in this set which will make up into an oval of track with a passing loop.  Banbao track is black and has a closer sleeper spacing, but is compatible with both LEGO and Enlighten track.

Overall I liked this set well enough to order another one.  At $NZ144.00 you get a lot of trainset for your money and I think it's a very good deal.  My only major concern is the delicate connection between the motor block and the r/c receiver, but on the other hand I think I shouldn't have any real problems with it now I'm old enough to look after my toys properly.
I purchased three Enlighten 633 Hopper Cars to go with my Banbao freight loco as they share the same blue and white colour scheme and they should make for a nice looking train when all setup together.








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Edited by Locomotive Annie, 03 January 2013 - 01:11 PM.

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#157 Hey Joe

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 02:34 PM

Thanks for that review Annie, it was interesting and informative.

It sounds like a decent set.  I think you're right about BanBao getting better, I put together one of their newer fire engines a few months back, it is a very nice and sturdy model.

No worries on the photos, we all know that that's a lot of work.

Glad you're feeling better now, have a great 2013!  Joe
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#158 Locomotive Annie

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 12:39 AM

Thanks Joe, I am feeling a lot better now and I'm starting to think about doing stuff with bricks again.  When I was ill if someone had come to the door giving away free Emerald Knight sets I wouldn't have even bothered to get out of bed to answer their knock at the door, that's how miserable I was feeling.

For those folk who were looking for instructions for the freight loco they can be found here  http://www.brickshel...ry.cgi?f=498495

I'm thinking about building one in LEGO myself as I'd like to have one in red with gold speed whiskers.
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#159 Konrad

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 07:36 PM

like everything out of china they look like a bad clone, now if they only cloned the 12v system............

#160 Locomotive Annie

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 10:01 PM

 Konrad, on 11 March 2013 - 07:36 PM, said:

like everything out of china they look like a bad clone, now if they only cloned the 12v system............

I've been buying clone sets direct from China for a while now, - mostly because it's the only way I can afford to continue to enjoy this hobby, - and it's becoming very noticeable that the Chinese manufacturers are upping their game.  The brick quality is improved for a start and with the better manufacturers like Banbao and Enlighten the quality is very close to that of Lego.  At one time I wouldn't buy Wange sets because their brick clutch was so poor, but the latest Wange sets I've purchased contained bricks that were perfectly molded with excellent clutch and were a delight to use.  With the lower end manufacturers set design and brick quality remains pretty mixed, but I tend to avoid those anyway unless they're so heavily discounted it's worth the bother of going through all the bricks in the set and throwing away the duds.

As I mentioned in my review you do get a lot of train set for your money.  There are weak points in the loco design in that the power connection to the motor block isn't very robust, the batteries aren't the easiest to change and housing for the RC receiver is too darn wide, but on the other hand the actual structure of the loco and the two cars in the set are pretty darn solid items once put together and can be handled without bits falling off.  By buying direct out of China this set can be had for close to $100 ($101.09) including shipping which is a pretty good deal.
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#161 Locomotive Annie

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 02:02 PM

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This a very quick thumbnail review of the centre coach for the Banbao Hi-speed train set.  When I purchased my Banbao Hi-speed trainset I was given an extra coach for free which I certainly didn't say no to.  I haven't put the Hi-speed trainset itself together yet, but I thought the spare coach was a good place to start.

In the past Banbao had some packing issues with their sets and there could be parts missing.  Not so with this coach, all the parts were there plus three spare pieces left over.  The instruction booklet was very clear and easy to follow and the way the coach is designed to go together is very good and makes for a nice strong item of rolling stock that wants to stay together and not shed pieces.  However I will say that I did notice that the bricks from this coach set didn't have the new Banbao trademark on them like the bricks in my Banbao freight loco set did and that the clutch wasn't quite as good.  No real problems with assembly, but I did find four small parts for the corridor connections to have no clutch at all and I had to put a dot of superglue on them to make sure they stayed put.  After having recently assembled the freight loco set this was a disappointment and it's plain that this coach is an older production item that uses bricks made from the older molding equipment Banbao was formerly using in production.

When it came to putting passengers into the coach I found I had to select their hairstyles fairly carefully or the roof wouldn't go on.  Not too much of a problem really, but slightly annoying after building Enlighten and Lego coaches where the passengers could wear their hair any way they wanted or even wear hats.
The magnetic couplings are a sealed type and work very well with a good magnetic grip.  They work fine with both Lego and Enlighten couplings too.
Banbao wheels are molded from a hard smooth plastic and are very free rolling when mounted into their axle holders.  This makes Banbao coaches and freight cars roll very smoothly on the track which is a good thing when it comes to hauling a train made up of them.

Overall I give this coach an 8 out of 10 with the quality of the older style bricks being the main let down, but mitigated somewhat by the coach's smooth rolling characteristics on the track and the very good couplings.  Hi-speed coaches aren't really my cup of tea, but I'm happy enough to have this one enter service on my line.
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#162 bricks n bolts

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 12:10 AM

 Locomotive Annie, on 15 March 2013 - 02:02 PM, said:

Banbao wheels are molded from a hard smooth plastic and are very free rolling when mounted into their axle holders.  This makes Banbao coaches and freight cars roll very smoothly on the track which is a good thing when it comes to hauling a train made up of them.

Good to know considering how bad the Enlighten wheels are. Are all the Banbao wheels the same design or is there variety? The wheel holders you have on that coach are a different design to the Lego standard, are the wheels and holders interchangeable with the Lego ones?
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#163 Locomotive Annie

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 02:41 AM

With the Banbao wheels and wheel holders everything is just that bit larger than Lego as is usual for this maker. This means that they aren't directly interchangeable with Lego and Enlighten, but will fit as entire assemblies,
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#164 Electricsteam

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 12:14 AM

Discovery have been making clone Legos now! I am not sure if they have made any trains but its bad that a major company is now cloneing Legos!
I'm not dead! I for the matter of fact appear to be very much alive!

#165 Locomotive Annie

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 06:30 AM

I've relapsed again and I'm not well so forgive me if I come across as being grumpy.  The patent on the plastic building set block is not Lego's sole preserve anymore so it is quite Ok for any other manufacturer who wants to do it to make plastic building bricks.  Making bricks to be compatible with as many other brick manufacturers as possible is only sensible business practice and is generally a good thing for the buying public.  Yes some Chinese manufacturers have copied some of Lego's themes, but when you look at such things as the range of battleships, military aircraft and armored vehicles as well as sets based on periods in ancient Chinese history and agriculture based subjects that are also being offered by Chinese manufacturers it's very plain that they are quite capable of designing and making completely original sets that have nothing to do with anything Lego has ever made.
Chinese manufacturers also make brick types that Lego has never made and most of them are pretty darn useful too.

I know it's moving a little beyond Trains, but one of the Chinese manufactures makes a Town-like set that has three largish houses, a bus stop, a bus and a street market stall to a brick count of over 2000 pieces and it costs less than $US100.00 with free worldwide shipping.  Lego doesn't have anything to equal this and if it doesn't watch out it is going to be left behind by China as the manufacturers there are upping their game and their brick quality is improving so it is now significantly better than it was even two years ago.

And bringing it back to trains I often buy the Enlighten 638 Train series set just because it is so plain useful for building steam locomotives.  People who have plainly never purchased this set call it a rip-off of the Lego MOT series steam loco, but it's not, because having put together both genuine original Lego MOT sets and the Enlighten 638 set the two sets have considerable differences in both design and assembly.
Yes I know some of the Enlighten Trains series wagons are close copies of Lego's MOT series wagons, but hey, Lego stopped making them which is why just about every brick train enthusiast world wide (save for the uber-purists) owns wagons from the Enlighten Train series. Lego just don't make enough variety of train related locos or wagons to satisfy anybody who wants to buy a set and run trains.
Having assembled both the green MOT passenger coach recently as well as the red Enlighten version I have to confess that I didn't notice any real difference in brick clutch or quality between them and despite what I've read on forums from the doomsayers I haven't noticed that my red Enlighten coaches have any sort of increased ability to fall apart on handling as compared with the green Lego one.
The other simple fact is that it's possible to buy three Chinese sets for the same money as just one Lego set, - or at least here in New Zealand where Lego prices are pretty darn steep it's possible to do it, -and sometime have change left over to put towards a fourth set as well!  As someone who is supported by an Invalid's pension I simply couldn't follow this wonderful hobby if I confined myself to buying nothing, but genuine Lego.  Mostly I buy genuine Lego modified plates, tiles and bricks and go with other makers for the basic bread and butter bricks.  I simply couldn't do it otherwise.
Just as a by the way my doctor encourages me to stick with building with plastic bricks as a hobby because it keeps my mind working and helps with the symptoms of poor memory, concentration and reduced cognitive function that is a part of this illness that I live with.  And thank heaven for the spell checker feature with this forum's software or you wouldn't be able to read any of this.

Rant over  :devil:
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#166 Locomotive Annie

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 08:09 AM

Well today worked out much better, one of the local online supply houses that stocks Banbao has a promotion where you can get $10.00 off anything you want when it's going to be your birthday soon.  They had Banbao Hi-speed train coaches at $5.00 off already so I purchased one using my $10.00 birthday discount as well and I ended up getting it for just $10.00 even.  That will give me three Banbao Hi-speed train coaches altogether which should be enough for my Hi-speed steam electric locomotive to haul about.  I was tempted to buy two coaches, but I'm having to watch my budget this week and didn't want to blow it.

I don't particularly like the look of the Banbao Hi-speed loco and I don't like the Enlighten Hi-speed train coaches, so this has all worked out really well.  I just need to print up some custom stickers with the 1980s New Zealand Railway logo on them and we'll be good to go. :classic:
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#167 Hey Joe

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 11:09 AM

Those birthday things are great, aren't they?

My son got a 50 RMB coupon at the local Toys R Us so we used it to buy a 350 RMB set so that was a nice little discount.

Joe
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#168 Locomotive Annie

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 12:32 PM

Yes they are great Joe :classic: .  I was really surprised when I got the email offering me $10.00 off because it was going to be my birthday in another week.  In middle age you don't really expect to get birthday surprises anymore (or at least I don't).  The coach was an easy pick because I already had two which didn't quite look like a decent length train and one more would make the train a nice fit for the space I've allowed for my station platform.
I bet your son was delighted with his voucher too and it made his day.
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#169 Konrad

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 04:58 AM

I find that even real lego biodegrades after time, the plastic cracks, looses color, and even develops a smell. I can cetainly say that the old school lego made in europe from the 80s and back was by far much more robust and better quality then the current bricks. They are junk!

#170 Electricsteam

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 12:06 PM

 Konrad, on 21 March 2013 - 04:58 AM, said:

I find that even real lego biodegrades after time, the plastic cracks, looses color, and even develops a smell. I can cetainly say that the old school lego made in europe from the 80s and back was by far much more robust and better quality then the current bricks. They are junk!
I have to disagree on that, yes bricks quality degrade after many years(hence my 111 bricks breaking under to much force) but I believe the brick quality has improved over the past years. Printing on the bricks has not improved as much as lifespan wise, because my Chima figure face has a scratch down the side....
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#171 Konrad

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 03:07 PM

 Electricsteam, on 21 March 2013 - 12:06 PM, said:

I have to disagree on that, yes bricks quality degrade after many years(hence my 111 bricks breaking under to much force) but I believe the brick quality has improved over the past years. Printing on the bricks has not improved as much as lifespan wise, because my Chima figure face has a scratch down the side....

I don't agree. A look at my mint 7735 , or 7722, or 7715, or 7710 confirms my thoughts.
1. The bricks fit perfectly together , zero gaps period- can t say the same for modern bricks which are clearly a different abs.
2. the Plastic is always the same lustre, identical shape and sheen, no moulding distortions, colour distortions, etc-again, can't say the same for modern bricks, while shiny they do not retain homologation
3. glass is CRYSTAL CLEAR. No scratches, nothing, can't same the same about the emerald night , or the red city train ( had to polish the glass clear on the city train and it was BRAND NEW)

When bricks were made solely in Denmark they were flawless and lasted. Packaging was done carefully, instructions NEVER got damaged in the box.... Now, they crack, are brittle and vary in quality. I had BRAND NEW light sockets split.... needless to say I emailed TLG and they sent me replacements.

Edited by Konrad, 23 March 2013 - 03:08 PM.


#172 Spitfire2865

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 04:19 PM

If its mint then why can you check the quality of the clutch? And also mint implies no use or wear. While lego usually is played with, anything with use would show wear.

And the brick plastic has changed. But it doesnt mean its bad. Lego, over the years, has changed to safer chemicals for the plastic and dyes.
And personally, I dont care if my clear bricks are crystal clear or not. Usually I cant tell anyway. Haha

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#173 zephyr1934

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 10:57 PM

The quality control is definitely not what it used to be, e.g., click on the image to see 2 split bricks on a MOC that was only a few months old. And then look at the modern color consistency, we now have a rainbow of yellow. I don't think the decline is due to manufacturing in Denmark, Lego went global with their manufacturing a few decades ago. Rather it is cost savings measures to increase output.

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#174 Locomotive Annie

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 05:57 AM

When I built my 317 locomotive MOD I went to a lot of effort to not use clone bricks and to only use genuine Lego bricks.  Despite this my loco still ended up being a patchwork of black bricks that had variable colour shading and lustre.  Most of the old original set bricks were almost a semi-matt dark charcoal and the much newer Lego bricks from my storage containers varied between being full gloss to semi-gloss and were pure black in colour.  I could have obtained a better colour match by using clone bricks truth be told, so I find myself wondering why I bothered.
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#175 Konrad

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 08:26 PM

 Spitfire2865, on 23 March 2013 - 04:19 PM, said:

If its mint then why can you check the quality of the clutch? And also mint implies no use or wear. While lego usually is played with, anything with use would show wear.

And the brick plastic has changed. But it doesnt mean its bad. Lego, over the years, has changed to safer chemicals for the plastic and dyes.
And personally, I dont care if my clear bricks are crystal clear or not. Usually I cant tell anyway. Haha

I have a ton of heavily 70s to 80s play worn legos and other then scratches on the bricks, they clutch like new...

Edited by Konrad, 24 March 2013 - 08:26 PM.




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