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Found 5 results

  1. Behold, my first large scale locomotive MOC, the EMD SD70ACe. The engine is 7 wide, and runs 48 studs in length from coupler magnet to coupler magnet. Everything is brick built, not a single sticker to be found on it. Motive power is provided from two PF Medium motors each driving an A1A wheel set. A PF receiver sits where the dynamic braking grid would be, and the battery box is accessed through the hole between the air horns. I know the locomotive number belongs to a GP-38, but it worked in the size. Given the motor locations, there wasn't any room to build the internals for the cab. And now, a shot of the internals. You can see the two PF Medium motors rather easily in here, along with the battery box and PF receiver. Given the generous length of the locomotive, I plan to upgrade it to two L motors next time I hit the LEGO store in Koln. It hauls a lot of wagons, but lacks speed. If the motor upgrade doesn't speed it up, at least I'll be able to haul a lot more. I'd like to thank everybody that's posted their MOCs up here. I've cribbed a few ideas from stuff to improve the looks.
  2. As promised, my version of the Union Pacific EMD SD70. A lot of the build is the same as the BNSF version I did but there are some differences. Looking at the BNSF version they are easy to spot. Getting the last few pieces took longer than expected, hence the delay in building her. And putting the stickers was a real pain in the you know what. But I'm really satisfied on how she turn up in the end. MOC UP EMD SD70 by Barduck12, on Flickr
  3. I was looking at that thread about compact PF solutions, and I thought about posting this MOC. The Alco HH series is a line of very early diesel-electric switchers (made in 'Murrika of course) produced between 1931 and 1940 after which it was succeeded by the much more well-know S series. The HH1000 was the 1000HP variant of the HH series of which 34 were produced between 1939 and 1940. Because other companies' color schemes were more difficult to implement, my HH1000 carries that of Union Pacific. UP owned exactly one HH1000, numbered 1251, which it acquired from the Mount Hood Railway in the late 60s. It was probably retired not long after. The most difficult part of the prototype to implement in Lego was by far the cab. Ideally the columns at the corners of the cab would be something like 2LU x 2LU, but that is pretty much impossible in Lego. After much fiddling I was able to get 2LU gaps in the back, but the cab is too long by about a stud to accomodate 5LU columns from the side. You'll notice the PF receiver sticking out of the center window. To me the main feature of this loco is that it is the perfect shape to cram two M motors, the AA battery box, and the reciever into a body 30 studs long. The receiver is actually just floating because that's the only orientation that works. The tractive effort is a little less than what I was able to get out of the RF-16, a combination I think of less weight and shorter bogies, but for practical purposes it'll basically pull anything reasonable - just slowly. As far as I can tell having a gear ratio other than 1:1 is more or less impossible here. This model has been about 85% complete for the past month or two, mainly for testing, but I'm about to BL the remaining parts, so it should get done soon! I didn't realize dark gray/blay saber blades were so expensive; so spoiled by LDD now.
  4. I was inspired by Dr_Spock_888 and his rotary snowplow to build my own. Needless to say, it didn't come out quite right. I don't think it looks very good, personally. The wheels should be Light bluish gray, but since I'm not made of money, that won't be happening. In fact, I probably won't build it in real life at all. Background: Here is Union Pacific rotary snowplow 900081- It was designed and built in 1966 at the UP Omaha shops. This rotary snowplow is the heaviest ever built weighing 367,400lbs and is 52’2” long and 17’ high. Three or four locomotives, which were controlled from the non-propelled plow, pushed it at four to six mph. The snowplow is powered by an EMD 16 cylinder 3,000hp turbocharged diesel engine that drives an electric generator, which provides power to turn the 12’ rotary blades at up to 150rpm. A steam generator provided heat to the cab and can thaw out the blades if they became frozen. This rotary snowplow was last used in Green River, WY in the mid 1980’s, and it was donated to the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri in 1994 by the UP. The rear of the plow. I put the door there, but now i think there is no door there on the prototype. Oops! The word "UNION PACIFIC" should go on the studs towards the rear, while "900081" should go on the studs in the center. The blades are actually part of Dr_Spock_888's design, but mine do not move with the train like his... these are not connected to the wheels on the track, and don not move unless you spin them with your hand. Inspiration: (Photo by Wampa-one from Flickr, not me) LDD file for the Lego model: http://www.mocpages....1411309594m.lxf Complaints & compliments are always welcome!
  5. The EMD trains frequent this LEGO Train Forum now and then. Of course there is the EMD E8 Santa Fe Super Chief, but others like Tearloch already made EMD's as well! Today I want to present my finished EMD E9 model: A video demo can be found here: I connected an Arduino Pro Mini to the LEGO LiPo, I also connected the normal IR receiver to the LiPo and connected the Train motor to it. B.t.w. I ran out of gray wheels so unfortunately one gray wheel. I use the small PF remote to enable / disable the Mars light / gyrolite (depending on the brand ;)) and the orange blinker. The Arduino uses a custom LEGO PF Remote receiver sketch and a typical 940nm IR receiver. The left one shows the gyrating light (2 SMD LEDs), the blink light also has a small SMD LED connected to a simple (insulated) copper wire. A peek on the inside: The IR receivers are at the right, the small one sticks out a little bit, enough to receive IR signals.