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Found 25 results

  1. Hi guys, I hope you won't mind a Technic guy playing with Trains a little. I have created something very ugly, but at the same time quite playable: More info & pics: http://sariel.pl/2017/04/railroad-crane/
  2. The model seen here is originally based upon the Brick City Depot "Winter Village Train Station". I have modified it enough from the original model to upload the LDD file for my version, which is available below. The following is a fictional backstory on Barretts station. (Their is a real Barretts station, but it looks nothing like this an is not as old as my model is supposed to be. That station's history is nothing like this one!) This station was built in 1912 in Barretts, Missouri for use by Brick Railway Systems. It stands on the old Pacific Railway of Missouri right-of-way, which first ran through the area in the mid-1850's. The station is a wooden structure with a stone fireplace, indoor waiting area, and a freight storage room that was added to the station in 1928. The upper floor is for the telegraph operator, which as of 1997 the telegraph has been replaced with a computer for the dispatcher to locate any train in his sector at any time using Global Positioning Satellites. (also known as GPS) Here is the street side. EDIT 2/24/17: added new ADA -compliant parts to the section of the model... see below for details: The upper floor has the computer for the dispatcher. In true Lego City style, their are no stairs to the top floor. This is the lower floor, with a waiting room, and ticket seller. The freight storage room off to the right was added later, and connects the station via a hole cut into the wall. Two sliding doors allow for cargo to be loaded onto the platform side, or out the street side for loading onto a truck. Here is the modular side of things: One left and one right platform, the station proper, the control room and it's roof are all connected by either pins or a very few studs. The original model I based this off off is seen here, while my version's LDD file can be found at this link. This model should be built to replace my 7997-style train station later this year. As usual, comments questions, and complaints are always welcome! EDITED 2/20/17: Updated the screenshots into real-life pictures.
  3. Hi! I haven't been very active here for a while, but I was busy "working" on some LDD models and revising them. Some of you might have seen them already on my flickr photostream. I also got to render my models for the first time Ok, I'll show you the pics My revised BR Standard Class 9F "Evening Star" I borrowed codefox421's coaches to try on the 9F (all credit for the coaches goes to him, here is the link to his topic: http://www.eurobrick...showtopic=97927 ) I also revised my GWR 14xx, but that'll be part of another topic soon Then I also rendered and (re) designed some rolling stock: From top left to bottom right: Cattle Wagon Tank Wagon Well Wagon Vent Van GWR 16 Ton Toad Brake Van BR 20 Ton Brake Van (brown livery) BR 20 Ton Brake Van (grey and yellow livery) I also designed a water tower: and a modular train station. This is one section: You can make it bigger: and build a pretty decent station: The station has too many parts to be rendered And another station building: I hope you enjoyed it Comments and criticisms are welcome! Greetings, Nick P.S.: You can see higher resolution pics on my flickr: http://www.flickr.co...s/94645638@N07/
  4. This mod is provided with opening (and locking!) doors, removable roof for the Captain / crew, and space for the number of the ship featured on the doors' exposed studs. (Unfortunately the printed tiles required are not available in LDD) I also added some height to the walls to keep the imaginary water (as the boat does NOT really float) out. ,and I extended the bridge's length by about double it's original amount of studs to make it a little less cramped. This ferry allows for three and 1/2 space of track, which isn't much, but is more than my original inspiration for this MOD, set 343 from 1968's blue track 4.5v era. Also, it uses up two of the annoying flex tracks! The doors open and shut, and with the included Technic pins (hidden in the pictures) allows for it to stay shut. The roof of the cabin comes off, allowing for access to the inside of the bridge. The loco seen is NOT included in the LDD file, but is merely to show off the 3 1/2 tracks worth of space for the placement of rail cars / engines. The LDD file is available here, if you want it. As usual, comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome!
  5. Originally built by my father in 2004-ish, this building is one of my dad's biggest creations. I modified it and brought it up to my specifications... okay, I whinged it from looking at the model about two years ago. I took some liberties, (and made some mistakes) with the original model. For example: the first version had a smaller smokestack, (diameter wise) and a different Railroad loading dock. I also changed the roof to be removable to allow access to the inside. The factory was originally built in sand red, not regular red. Since this color is extremely expensive and hard to find, I used regular red with modern white window frames plus light blue glass. This end of the factory has a ladder to the top of the smokestack. Inside view with the removable roof taken off. I never finished this part (neither did my Dad), and probably never will. As to what it is supposed to produce... that's up to your imagination. The boxcars were inspired by this red 2014 design by Flickr user lets_play_lego. The doors open about four studs to let freight (or hobos) inside. The grille parts on the sides of the car are supposed to be ladders to access the roof walkway. The freight cars are already built in real life, but the factory is too expensive to build right now by me... maybe someday! The LDD file for both factory and boxcars is available here. Comments, Questions and Complaints are always welcome!
  6. I took two bridge designs (lattice girder and truss) and combined them. I know it isn't realistic, but the design is the best I could come up with. However, the truss part is removable via Technic pins, so it can become more viable for display at shows or home layout use. Here is the bridge with the top trusses on. The bridge with the top trusses removed. The 18 Technic holes could be used for decoration of some sort. The two ramps (which are included in the LDD file) use two-thirds of a brick every 16 studs over three track-lengths to make the gap from base-plate level to full bridge height. PLEASE NOTE: Their is a height restriction for the bridge with the top attached if you use the Maersk double-stack train cars or anything taller than set 10014 (My Own Train - Caboose). The bridge will simply not fit anything taller without modifications. (The train car is NOT included in the LDD file!) Here is my original inspiration for the bridge, courtesy of Flickr user Fireglo450: lattice girder bridge on Flickr The Lego Digital Designer file for my model is here: LDD file This bridge will be built in real life sometime around January 2017. Comments, Questions, & complaints are welcome!
  7. This is a set 76057 (Spider-Man: Web Warriors Ultimate Bridge Battle) inspired model in single track train bridge form. It can be easily extended to make a higher or shorter / longer bridge, depending on your needs, but as it stands now it's 10 tracks long with two 6 track long ramps. The connector clips between the roadway and tower are not connected because they were crashing LDD with it's many rotation issues, though it works in real life the same way as in set 76057. Without the ramps attached. The deck has been lowered and the tower added some height to let a double stacked container train of 10219 style cars through, (those are the tallest cars Lego has made) The model has two towers, four deck sections, and four deck with connector modules, plus two ramps. (one left and one right) The (UPDATED) LDD file is available here: http://www.moc-pages.com/user_images/80135/1472311962m.lxf As usual, Comments, Questions, and Complaints are always welcome! NOTE: quote edited to remove my name and substitute it with my username "Murdoch17".
  8. I was inspired by a Facebook post to the Modular LEGO Buildings group by a person named Kade Rodgers to create this railway station. Here is the original version that comes from 2011 and was later demolished: This model was inspired by set 10199, Winter Village toy Shop. The building is open backed, and features a desk on the top floor and ticket counter with cash register on the first floor. ...and here is the newer version the above model was turned into. This newer model is modular, and as such has five removable sections that combine into one medium size station. Here you can see the track side of the station which has plenty of seats (16 chairs, to be precise) for waiting passengers to sit on. Here you can see the street side, where the public enters the station from the parking lot or can directly access the platform via the ramp. You can also see the stairs to the upper floor which is where the station master's office is. This is the inside of the station, with two ticket machines and six seats for the indoor passenger waiting area. The coal burning fireplace is still used on really cold winter nights, but since the last few winters have been mild in Ironwood, it hasn't been used in a good long while. Here is the old station master's office on the upper floor, which is off limits the the public. In more recent years it has been made to function as the employee break room / switch control tower for the tracks in the immediate vicinity of the station. The entire model is made up of five sections that come apart. They are as follows: first floor, second floor, second floor roof, left platform and right platform. Sadly, their is no LDD file available for thew new station. However, comments, questions & complaints are always welcome! (EDIT 7/13/16: After hearing some good suggestions about adding a ramp back onto one of my railroad stations, I have finally finished finding the parts for it and gotten some pictures taken of the updated model. Enjoy!)
  9. This slimmed down 6 wide Birney Safety Trolley was first built in 2011 and based on the work of Brickshelf user J-2 and his vintage 2003 model of the Mister Rodgers' Neighborhood. (link to it here: http://www.brickshel...ery.cgi?f=37552 ) I have modified that users' model to have enclosed sides and now have reduced the width from 8 studs to 6, plus I added real seats, trolley poles, and magnets for pulling freight or a second streetcar. These magnets are at the correct height for use with official sets and most, if not all, of my MOCs. This car is numbered 37, and I have another one numbered 32 that isn't finished yet. (I only ordered four black macaroni bricks when I should have ordered eight, thus delaying completion of the other streetcar.) This is the former state of the real cars, which have since been destroyed to make the newer version seen above. This is the fictional electric line that runs the streetcars on my town. It is also called the IG&WER for short, as Ironwood Glencoe & Western Electric Railway is a bit of a mouth full... (Updated as of 5/12/16) LDD file for the Birney Safety Trolley(6 wide): http://www.moc-pages...1463073264m.lxf (Update 7/6/16: added real life pictures to this post!) (Update 7/7/16: car 32 finished, but since it's the same as 37, I will not be uploading separate photos of it, besides this one of them both on my layout.) comments, questions, and complaints welcome!
  10. The shed is based off set 60103 (Airport Air Show) and has now been updated (3/4/16) to have a bigger, stronger roof with less gaps. I also removed the inner platform as it wasn't my best work and didn't look right. This construct is a 74 studs long x 32 studs wide locomotive shed. (that's the actual shed coverage, not the track itself: the track is 80 studs long alone) For those of you who like math, or would want to build this yourself, the size of the shed + track in more conventional measurements is 25 inches or 63.5 centimeters long and 10 inches / 25.4 centimeters wide. I don't know the height, but it is the same height as my new black-and-red shed design and my older World City building. By the way: baseplates were not added for two reasons: 1) the model is slightly off at some point and does fit in real life, but not digitally. (you will either need a 32 x 80 stud baseplate, or a combination of smaller baseplates.) 2) Baseplates keep crashing the model file for some reason. The shed is 11 bricks tall at it's lowest point, and 15 bricks tall in the center. The side view of the model. The shed can accommodate 8 wide trains with ease and is extendable to be as long or as short as you need it. Here we see my Southern Pacific GS-6 "Daylight" 4460 and a 4-8-2 mountain type locos with the shed to give you a sense of scale. These are the longest locomotives (not including two unit diesels) I own, and they fit with room to spare. Please note: The engine's are NOT included in the shed's digital file! And here it is in real life to help you figure the size of the shed. LDD file for the shed ONLY: http://www.moc-pages.com/user_images/80135/1457118933m.lxf (If you are interested in the steam loco and want to know more / have the LDD file, please look here: http://www.eurobrick...topic=118894 ) Comments, questions, and complaints welcome!
  11. I started designing this station model back in early December of last year, basing it off of set 60050, Train Station from Summer 2014. I got stuck with the set's roof, and put it aside. Then, earlier this week, I got inspiration to remove the roof and start afresh. I eventually removed the big 2 x 12 x 4 windscreens and replace them with two rows of 1 x 2 x 3 windows. I removed the hanging station clock and added the tower, which has unprinted faces in LDD but it should use this print In real llfe: http://alpha.bricklink.com/pages/clone/catalogitem.page?P=3960pb024#T=C&C=11 Anyway, the station has four ticket machines outside, 12 seats on the platform, with eight more seats inside (four of those are for seating in the pizzeria / dining area). Their is even a coffee machine to quench the thirst of the caffeine addicted passengers, station master and / or train crew! The street and track sides both feature eight letters each to name your station. You could even name it Legocity, just like in the original set, or maybe something simple like Bricktown, Duplobay, Ogelvill, or the ever popular name of Galidor. The inside features the dining area for customers of the pizza restaurant, seating for weary travelers and a ticket kiosk for the lone station employee. The station's right and left platform can be extended or removed. Here is the LDD file: http://www.mocpages.com/user_images/80135/1449269932m.lxf Please note: I won't be getting this model as it was originally designed for my brother when I started last year, but now I'm trying to get my dad to get it for his railroad: he wants a station, but the LEGO Shop near us stopped stocking the original 60050 set. This might be the next best thing, and besides, the original set looks too modern for his railroad, plus it doesn't go well with the 9V era stuff anyway...
  12. An overall shot Close Ups A city scene James River Crossing Metra Train BNSF Freight TGV and one I found an image of that I recreated here.
  13. Nothing special. Just an old railroad warehouse.
  14. The goal was to made a Bridge signal box like company Kibri has it for model railways. Here is my version.
  15. This model was inspired by Scotnick1 and his Maithwaite Station model from "The Railway Series", also known as "Thomas and Friends". Here is a album of his with the original station in it: https://www.flickr.c...157639900227095 The station features a five track long platform, which can be retracted to a minimum of three tracks by removing the two side segments. More sections can be added to increase the length to whatever you need, with removable end-caps at either left / right side. All of these platforms are held together by Technic pins. Inside the station proper is a help / ticket desk with cash register, and off to the left side is a employees-only area with stairs to the second floor office. This office features a desk with chair and fireplace. The second floor roof, the second floor proper and first floor roof are removable. Also, the two clocks on the second floor roof are supposed to have this print: http://www.bricklink...asp?P=3960pb024 (This print is not currently available in LDD.) The street side features a short staircase to the front entryway. The studs above these doors and the same on the opposite side are supposed to spell out the station name. I haven't decided on a name for this one yet, but am leaning towards the name "Imperial". Here we see the individual components of the station. This includes: - first floor / main platform (1) - second floor (1) - roof of first floor (1) - roof of second floor / clock tower (1) - end-caps for platform (1 left and 1 right version) - identical platform extenders (2) Here is the LDD file: http://www.mocpages.com/user_images/80135/1430322575m.lxf This station will replace Barretts station on my layout (some parts of Barretts will be reused on this model), as this station is larger that the other, and has a street side, whereas Barretts does not. Comments are always welcome!
  16. Here we have a few microscale locomotives. They include the iconic Thomas The Tank Engine and his friend Percy. Also included is a BNSF locomotive with freight train and a Santa Fe Passenger. BNSF freight Subway and City Thomas and Percy Random Train Santa Fe Train An overview of all of the models
  17. This shelf is designed for use with HO scale trains but can easily be widened for use with Lego Trains Sorry about the fact that the images are in drive again I do this at school and Brickshelf is blocked. links---- it takes you to a folder. https://docs.google.com/folderview?id=0B0LIffC6GUIYVXdSX0xlcThjWWc&usp=docslist_api
  18. I am into building realistic builds but have a low budget below is a basic model I made with random spare pieces Links here----- https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B0LIffC6GUIYQ0cwQjYxLU9JRjg/edit?usp=docslist_api And here------ https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B0LIffC6GUIYZkd1V0N2RGkyNEk/edit?usp=docslist_api
  19. I'd like your input on this set I made recently: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/95531 It's based on a very famous event in US history in 1869, when the rail networks of the East and West coasts were symbolically connected for the first time with the driving of a final golden railroad spike with a silver hammer. To the best of my knowledge, this would be the first non-fictional Wild West Lego train set. The 150th anniversary of this event is only a few years away, so I figure now is as good a time as ever for Lego to release something like this.
  20. This station was built in 1912 in Glencoe, Missouri for use by Brick Railway Systems. It stands just a stones throw from the Meramec River on the old Pacific Railway of Missouri right-of-way, which first ran through the area in the mid-1850's. The station is a stone structure with a fireplace plus indoor and outdoor waiting areas. The upper floor is for the telegraph operator. As of 1997, the telegraph has been replaced with a computer for the dispatcher to locate any train in his sector at any time using Global Positioning Satellites. (also known as GPS) Here is the track side of the station, featuring a five track long platform. Here is the street side. Their will be printed 1 x 1 tiles spell out the town name of GLENCOE on both of the signs when built in real life. Here is the modular side of things: One left and one right platform, the station proper, the control room and it's roof are all connected by either pins or a very few studs. In reality, the town of Glencoe really exists, but this station does not. There really was a Pacific Railway of Missouri, which bored the first two railway tunnels west of the Mississippi River in the mid 1850's at Barrets, Missouri. Barrets is where the Museum of Transport is located and Glenoce has the Wabash Frisco & Pacific Railway (a 12 inch gauge steam railway) which runs for two mile round trip on the old right of way. The original model seen here is based upon the Brick City Depot "Winter Village Train Station" instructions. I think I have modified it enough to upload the LDD file, which is available here: http://www.mocpages....1421346826m.lxf I have calculated the cost of this model at around a $110 USD (give or take), and am currently raising funds to create it in real life. Comments, questions and complaints are always welcome!
  21. Here we have 3 railway treasures of years past: -Southern Pacific #4460: the only War Baby Daylight left and herald of the end of steam on the Southern Pacific. -The Aerotrain: a failed prototype from General Motors meant to save passenger rail, one of only two ever built (though both survive) -EMD FT #103: the diesel demonstrator that proved steam power could (and would) be forever replaced by diesel locomotives. All three can be built in real life, and the LDD File is included at the bottom of this post. Electro-Motive Division (EMD) FT type #103 diesel demonstrator Built by General Motors (GM) / Electro Motive Division (EMD) in 1939, this is the diesel that showed the way to the future, signaling the start of the diesel era. However, as one day must start, another must end. This two A & two B locomotive set got the ball rolling towards the end of steam as mainline workhorses by pulling a modern two steam engines backwards - while said engines were at full forward throttle. Anyway, this particular engine was originally owned by Electro-Motive as a demonstrator. It was sold to Southern Railway and eventually placed in the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri. It was repainted in it's original Electro Motive colors for it's journey to Railfair '91 held in Sacramento, California. It is currently on display once more in the St. Louis Museum of Transportation. The FT class eventually led to the entire F series, one of which is presumably the basis for the Santa Fe Super Chief engine in set 10020. This LEGO model features the the round porthole windows and no interior. The windshield is supposed to be the printed version from the Horizon Express. The three exposed studs on each of the nose sides are for tiles spelling out "103". Here is it's real world counterpart in 1989. (photo by Wrong Main on Flickr, seen here: http://www.flickr.co...r-dDFRKh-dxsdeg ) Sadly, the B-Unit is now a rusted hulk, but the A unit is thankfully still in this pristine condition. Southern Pacific GS-6 Daylight #4460 steam locomotive Southern Pacific 4460 is the only surviving GS-6 Class steam locomotive. The GS-6 is a semi-streamlined 4-8-4 Northern type steam locomotive. GS stands for "General Services". The locomotive was built by the Lima Locomotive Works for the Southern Pacific in 1943. The GS-6 lacked side skirting and red and orange "Daylight" paint found on previous locomotives of the GS class, and were painted black and silver instead. This was because the US government controlled locomotive manufacturers during World War II and had turned down Southern Pacific's order of fourteen new Daylight locomotives. Southern Pacific re-designed the engine for general service and it was finally approved, but the government took four of them and gave them to the smaller and power-starved Western Pacific Railroad Their smaller size when compared to previous GS class locomotives and the fact that they were built during WWII earned them the nicknames of "War Babies" and "Baby Daylights". 4460 is famous for pulling what was to be the final movement of steam on the Southern Pacific Railroad in 1958. Following the final excursion, 4460 was donated to the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri, on April 16, 1959, where the engine has since sat along with many other historic steam and diesel locomotives from around the country. The 4460 is sometimes called the "Forgotten Daylight", referring to its only surviving sibling, the very famous Southern Pacific GS-4 #4449. The LEGO version is supposed to have Big Ben Brick XL 4 flanged & 4 unflanged wheels. The one seen here are placeholders. The studs on the cab and tender rear are supposed to have tiles saying "4460" on them, while the tender sides are to say "Southern Pacific". Here we see Southern Pacific #4460 in 2009. (photo by Wampa-One from Flickr. Link: http://www.flickr.co...e-fWQ6dQ-fWQ6gW ) The Lego version is based on Anthony Sava's version of the GS-4 Daylight #4449, a related cousin of the #4460 and the only other Daylight left in existence. I was contacted by Jan Snyder on MOCpages who had this story to tell of his interaction with #4460: General Motors (GM) Aerotrain demonstrator consist The Aerotrain was a streamlined trainset introduced by General Motors Electro Motive Division in the mid-1950s. Like all of GM's body designs of this mid-century era, this train was first brought to life in GM's Styling Section. Chuck Jordan was in charge of designing the Aerotrain as Chief Designer of Special Projects. It utilized the experimental EMD LWT12 locomotive, coupled to a set of modified GM Truck & Coach division 40-seat intercity highway bus bodies. The cars each rode on two axles with an air suspension system, which was intended to give a smooth ride, but had the opposite effect. The two Aerotrain demonstrator sets logged over 600,000 miles (970,000 km) and saw service on the following railroads: the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway; the New York Central Railroad; the Pennsylvania Railroad; and the Union Pacific Railroad. Starting in February 1956 the Pennsylvania Railroad ran the Pennsy Aerotrain between New York City and Pittsburgh Pennsylvania, leaving New York at 0755; the round trip was scheduled 7 hr 30 min each way. From June 1956 to June 1957 it ran between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. In 1956 Aerotrain No. 2 was leased as a demonstrator to the New York Central, and ran between Cleveland and Chicago. In March 1956 the Aerotrain made experimental runs for the Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe Railway in California as the San Diegan between Los Angeles and San Diego. Its use ended because the trainset had to be turned after each trip and it needed helper locomotives on the Sorrento Grade north of San Diego. Starting December 1956 Union Pacific ran the ex-New York Central Aerotrain as the City of Las Vegas between Los Angeles and Las Vegas. The train was eventually relegated to Chicago commuter service on the Chicago & Rock Island Railroad. GM's "lightweight with a heavyweight future" was introduced at a time when US passenger train revenues were declining due to competition from airlines and private automobile travel. Although it featured a streamlined design, the Aerotrain failed to capture the imagination of the American public. The cars, based on GM's bus designs and using an air cushioning system, were rough riding and uncomfortable. The design of the locomotive section rendered routine maintenance difficult, and it was underpowered. Both trainsets were retired in 1966 after a decade's use. The Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri and the National Railroad Museum in Green Bay, Wisconsin each have one of the locomotives, and two of the cars. This LEGO version is to have a red number tile saying "3" (even though there were only two trains ever built! ) on the cab sides, and i'm not quite sure this will go around curves or switches. This version if based on a couple pictures I saw on Brickshlef. Oh, and the pieces on the front bogie between the wheels are CMF paint cans... has anyone else done that? Aerotrain #3 and it's two remaining cars from the original 10 car set in 2009 (photo by emzepe from Flickr. Link: http://www.flickr.co...s-dHVGkr-edHdNC ) Sadly, the other 8 cars were scrapped. The other Aerotrain set is in an enclosed space in Green Bay Wisconsin. Three Railway Treasures Here we have them all together. LDD file for all three: http://www.mocpages....1395015218m.lxf Comments, Questions, & complaints are always welcome!
  22. What's your favorite railway museum, and why? I was at the China Railway Museum here in Beijing a few weeks ago for the third time and it got me to thinking about all the wonderful train museums I've seen in my travels. I thought it might make for an interesting discussion here in the train forum. Mine would have to be the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri. It's been awhile since I've been there, but some pieces that stick out in my mind are the Big Boy (above, photo from their website) and UP 6944 (below, photo from UP150.com): This GM Aerotrain (designed to pull modified highway bus coaches for commuters) always fascinated me (photo from Wikipedia): They also have the original EMD FT Demo engine # 103 which is a model I always admired (photo from American-Rails.com): Anyway, they have a lot of stuff there! If you're anywhere near it, don't hesitate to take a look. Their web site is here. Besides the large array of historical pieces, the fact that it was within walking distance of my home factors in a lot to it's ranking as my favorite. A couple other American museums that I remember as being exceptional are: California State Railway Museum in Sacramento, CA B & O Railway Museum in Baltimore, MD ...but I'll leave those for others to discuss as I'm not so familiar with them. Oh, the China Railway Museum in Beijing? It's pretty good! It's completely enclosed in one huge shed and they have an interesting array of motive power there. It would be better if they had more English placards and maybe a bus that goes there as it can be tricky to find and hard to get a taxi out of. If you happen to be in Beijing and have an afternoon to kill, go take a look. Their web site (in Chinese) is here, the Wikipedia entry (in English) is here. They also have an annex in the center of the city in the old Qianmen Railway Station, but I've never been there. I don't think that there's any rolling stock there. Ok, so which museum(s) is/are your favorite? Joe
  23. Hi guys, my 1st post/question, does any one know how to make alternating flashing lights like a railroad crossing has? (Flashes left-right-left-right) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Z9pAUemAw4 Or even to make flashing lights like this: Heres a video of a railroad crossing: Thanks.
  24. Hey! Do you have a favorite TV show, series and/or documentary program about trains? I've started to get interested in trains again after a long hiatus and am not so familiar with what's been put out recently. Personally, I've always enjoyed Michael Palin's travel documentaries such as; 'Around the World in Eighty Days' and 'Pole to Pole', although they're not strictly about trains. He's also done a show in the 'Great Railway Journeys' series from the BBC, hasn't he? There are a couple of railway-related series that I have been watching lately: > 'Rail Away' - the English version is a documentary series of twenty-five programs in which they go to a different European country each show. > 'Extreme Trains' - an American show of eight episodes with a different focus each time, i.e.; freight train, steam train, etc. Kid-related shows are, of course, Thomas and the 'Choo Choo Bob Show'. There's also a show called 'Chuffington' or something like that, isn't there? What have I missed? Thanks, Joe
  25. Inspired by Locomotive Annie's recent 'Steam Electric Locomotive' topic and Electrosteam's 'Bag of Ideas' topic, I threw together this little MOD. Car #168 is the end result of a secret program started by the CIA in 1964. The previous 167 cars all met a grisly demise on the test track, incurring the loss of numerous personnel. The work was so hazardous that hardened criminals who were offered reduced sentences were about the only people willing to work on it. Haircut (pictured here with his guard) was one of the few to survive. The engine was designed to air-lift itself behind enemy lines where it could wreck havoc in it's own unique way. Most of the interior of the car contained various weapons including large calibre machine guns and missle launchers under the retractable roof. There was also room to store the rotors when not in use as, obviously, they would cause a bit of a problem with bridge and tunnel clearances. This prototype - the first to successfully complete trials - was launched from an aircraft carrier when it suddenly developed engine problems and presently it rests at the bottom of the Gulf of Tonkin. The crew was able to paracute to safety however the general in charge of the program was secretly shot for embezzling funds and for being so daft as to think this was a viable project in the first place! Due to lack of funds the program was discontinued soon afterwards. Oh, what's this? The Atlantis team has stumbled upon the wreck! What are they doing in S.E. Asia? Aren't they supposed to be in the Atlantic or Mediterranean somewhere and what are the Fish-men doing at the wreck? There are rumors of rolling stock that were being developed as well but no photographs have ever surfaced. There are several researchers digging through the files, who knows what they might find...? Ok, hope you got a laugh out of it. I don't have much in the way of space, time or bricks...did the best I could. The 'Atlantis' shot probably would've been more successful from a higher angle, live and learn. Joe