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Found 54 results

  1. Jan-'17 Now, building instruction file (PDF) is available at Rebrickable linked below http://www.rebrickable.com/mocs/Modoro/motorized-42056-porsche-911-gt3-rs-version-11 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Hi.. everyone! This my 2nd posting here, introducing my own renovation(or remodeling) of TECHNIC 42056 PORSCHE 911 GT3 RS. Among the newly released 2016 Lego models, "TECHNIC 42056 PORSCHE 911 GT3 RS" received the best attention before release. In addition to its nice and detailed appearance, now I attempt to review the process of blowing features including RC driving and 4-speed gearbox shifting, and LED lights as well. The video above shows the process of remodeling TECHNIC 42056 PORSCHE 911 GT3 RS and a driving test in the following order. The process of remodeling each part of PORSCHE chassis Driving and steering test of the remodeled PORSCHE chassis The process of binding the renovated chassis to the PORSCHE body Field driving test The main target of this RC remodeling is just a chassis (or power-train) that is composed of front/rear axis, power transmission and steering units. The following figure compares the before and after appearance of the renovated PORSCHE chassis. <Before> <After> The changes and features of the renovated PORSCHE chassis are as follows Mounted drive motors (L-motor x 4) Mounted a steering motor (S-motor x 1) Modified gear shifting method not using the paddle shift remodeling of the 4-speed sequential gearbox for enhanced durability and power transmission efficiency Mounted PF battery (optionally, two batteries) Mounted two SBRICKs for the remote control capability While including all of the above modifications, it maintains the design and major features of the original 42056 model. (rear fake engine room, Hand of God, glove box, toolbox under the hood etc.) This review is divided into a total of 9 sections, and the following videos illustrate the building progress of each section, respectively. part 1: chassis frame remodeling In this section, the main contents of RC motorizing 42056 PORSCHE chassis is largely divided into three sub-parts and will be described as follows . 1) reinforcement of chassis regidity A dictionary meaning of chassis frame is defined as "the frame plus the "running gear" like engine, transmission, drive shaft, differential, and suspension" In the original 42056 model implementing the real PORSCHE 911 GT3 RS in LEGO model, a chassis is composed to support the body, transmissions, front and rear axis, engine etc. By the way, LEGO designers did not consider the RC driving from the stage of planning the TECHNIC 42056 model. Thus the chassis regidity, weakened by adding driving & steering motors, gear-shifting motors and battery boxes, cannot maintain the body shape of its own secure and inhibits the stable driving performance. In order to reinforce the chassis regidity that is more weakened by removing liftarms to mount 4 driving L-motors under the gear-box, 42056 chassis core is newly configured using a total of thress TECHNIC 5x11 liftarms. 2) provision of driving motor mounting space 4 driving L-motors are mounted under the gear box between the driver and front passenger. 3) provision of gear-shifting axle mounting space In the original 42056 model, The transmission and drive shaft axis are designed in the form perpendicular to each other. According to this design, gear shifting can be done accurately, smoothly and sequentially from 1st speed to 4th speed. However in the driving test progress, it turned out that thress 24-toothed bevel gears in driving pathways can not deliver high torque & power to the rear axle and differential gears. Thus, to remove three bevel gears in the pathway of the remodeled 42056 chassis, gear shifting axle is heightened by 3L and driving shaft is connected right to the 4-speed transmissions. part 2: 4-speed sequential gearbox remodeling part 3: control units for the RC gear shifting part 4: driving motors mounting part 5: dashboard remodeling part 6: front/rear axis remodeling part 7: rear engine room remodeling part 8: assembly process of the renovated PORSCHE chassis part 9: binding the renovated chassis to the body of PORSCHE These are all I prepared for the review of the motorized 42056 PORSCHE model. Thanks for reading & watching (-;
  2. Please support on LEGO Ideas if you like this project! If you remember those little clockwork robots, which used to be toys and are now prized collection articles, than you will surely recognize my representation! I've been working on this for some time now and I'm proud to say that this robot walks as well as the real thing! It uses two pullback motors, a couple cogs (gears) and 623 LEGO elements to achieve (I only hope you agree ) both good looks and great functionality. The mechanism with the incorporated motors is made to fit exactly into the case and the case comes off all in one piece (I like my modularity). The mechanism for the legs is the most simple thing ever but making it was as complicated as any of my larger MOCs, because balance played such a vital role in all of it. You can still see it wobble as it walks (I find the wobble quite indearing though ) and a lot of work went into keeping it from falling when it does. I like to think this is my best work yet, so I hope you like it just as much enjoy!!! My Flickr gallery I'm not sure if anyone's seeing this video at the bottom of the page, so I'm editting it in up here... Please support on LEGO Ideas if you like this project!
  3. Hello everyone. This is my very first motorized lego vehicle. I'm wondering if somebody could help me to improve all the mechanisms. The vehicle has front steering (this technique requires less space between wheels and mudguards). It's powered by two motors (PF L and PF Servo). I would like to know if there is a way to implement a differential gear. I'm also looking for the best steering technique. I would appreciate any ideas.
  4. Hello, I would like to motorized my set - Lego Technic 42037 vers. B PF RC or A. Which parts I need and/or which briks I need to motorized my set? Is there any video to show (step by step) how to do it? Thanks for any help
  5. Hello fellow builders! I felt that it was finally time to share with you all something that I've been working on/ playing with for a while now: My L-Motor Frame. L-Motor Block Types by Nick Jackson, on Flickr The concept for this project was to create a stable platform on which (primarily) steam engines could be produced with less motor& cable obstructions. L-Motor Block Types by Nick Jackson, on Flickr This would then allow the engine's body to be built relatively free of electrical components, or crammed with them in the case of tank engines. L-Motor Block Variants by Nick Jackson, on Flickr I think that the most interesting part of the frame is the fact that it is easily modifiable, and can essentially go from 2 to 7 axles! At the time of writing this however, I've only dared to go up to 4 axles for a related project. L-Motor Block Variants (2) by Nick Jackson, on Flickr Hopefully these frames and their different gear ratios will inspire you to make a steam engine! Although, there are a great many European engines that are not steam, but employ connecting rods for their drive wheels. L-Frame with Medium-Large wheels by Nick Jackson, on Flickr Lastly, here are some alternative wheel sizes that you may be interested in. These are made possible by the work of BigBen Bricks and @Shupp. The smallest feasible size would be the Medium-Large drivers by Shupp. These would need a bit of reworking from a standard L-Frame in order to clear switches and such. New Wheels!!! (2) by Nick Jackson, on Flickr Here, a set of XL wheels from BigBen fit nicely on a standard frame. L-Frame with XXL wheels by Nick Jackson, on Flickr And, by upgrading to the longer frame size, you could even accommodate 6 of Shupp's XXL wheels! Hopefully this post will benefit everyone, but moreso people who've had a difficult time getting into trains, and especially steam! Please, let me know your thoughts, and definitely share your ideas for a potential future build that might benefit from this design! Oh, and here's the link to the files: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B9xAgBdzDImZaFFsM2lGVkdmcEk Thanks for reading, ~M_Slug357~
  6. Hi! Two years ago, I did a motorizable cherry picker for a contest on the french forum TechLUG. So, I used the comments I had, and I decided to : - Use a more little scale - Better proportions - I did a better cab. In the first MOC, it was too heavy because of the battery box inside it. - The first cherry picker was motorizable by a M motor ; this one is only motorized, more simple and efficient. To summararise : Better proportions (I hope ^^) Only motorized I use inverted gearboxes for : - Outriggers - Arm - Turn table And the manual functions : - The steering (of course) - Extension of the arm So, here's the result: The simplest function is the steering. But there is the L motor over it. So, I used three 16t gears to turn the wheels directly by their axle of rotation. And now, the gearbox. It's an inverted gearbox : the "out gears" turn in the opposite sense. So, when you invert the position of the driving ring, you invert the rotation of a function. Here are screenshots: The outriggers can up the truck: the wheels don't touch the floor. To finish, the arm. It has a triple deformable quadrilateral. I needed so much time to do it, but it's nice to see in action. And the video :
  7. This is my model of the Meter Maid Cart from Zootopia. Features: Full independent suspension; Easy access to battery box. Remotely controlled Power Functions: Driving (Large motor); Steering (Servo motor) + synchronized steering wheel; 4-speed sequential gearbox (just for fun!) switched with a Servo motor. Windscreen wiper (Medium motor). Manually controlled Power Functions: Headlights (manual switch). Manual functions: Rotating flash lights. If you like this model, please support it on LEGO Ideas! Also, if you like Zootopia, see my models of Judy Hopps and Nick Wilde! Or even support them on LEGO Ideas!
  8. Hi Guys, been a while! Just thought I would drop a quick line letting anyone know that instructions are available for my GTHO, only 4.5 years after I first started building! hahaha. I have received a lot of enquirers about the instructions and its those people that keep me at it, through to completion. Please check out Rebrickable. :) Now I can finally start on something new! YAY ;P
  9. I finally have good pictures of the demonstrator model for my take on a cheap no-modification-required switch track motor. Have a look! The key that makes this work is that the servo acts on a slider, which pushes on the little spring-loaded switch point piece, rather than forcing the lever mechanism back and forth. As such, it takes very little force to change the switch from open to closed and vice versa. I'm using two of the 1x1x1 corner panels to trap the servo horn so that it pushes the slider back and forth, while a 2x2 corner tile pushes the point piece backwards and forwards. The actual switch lever needs to be in the 'open' position to allow the point piece to move back and forth properly; otherwise, the switch will stay closed even when the servo releases the point piece. I'm using an Arduino Uno, but you could use any Arduino or compatible clone as long as you get the pins hooked up right. It's a lucky coincidence that the servo is the size it is; two of the 1x2x3 panels form a nice enclosure that keeps it from moving about too much. It's important to get the older style that don't have the reinforcing ridges on the edges, as otherwise it won't fit. I used a small piece of paper folded on itself a couple of times to keep the servo wedged in tightly. I imagine you could use some of those 1x2 bricks with the vertical groove in them to help hide the servo cabling, but I didn't bother since this is only a demonstrator. Here's a better view of the setup without the track in the way. My servos came with a pack of three differently-shaped horns to put on them - I'm using the shortest one available to me (mine was 19.5mm long with six small holes in it and was the only one with one 'arm' on it). I also have not permanently attached it with the screws that also came in the package, mainly for the purposes of testing. Lastly, here's a picture of the support structure I built up to keep everything in place. I also made an LDD file of the structure as well as the slider mechanism and servo holder so that you can build your own! http://bricksafe.com/files/Phoxtane/digital-model-files/servoswitchtrack.lxf The hard part of this built is not the mechanism, but setting up the servo as well as the Arduino controller. If anyone is interested, I can do a more in-depth post on how these servos work and how to use them, but the basics go something like this: Attach the servo to the Arduino using the diagram on this page: https://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/Sweep Test your servo to make sure it's working using the example code on that page (the servo should slowly move back and forth between its endpoints) Center the servo at 90 degrees - http://www.allbot.eu/build/allbot-arduino/centering-a-servo/ - this puts the servo at a known position for use in our mechanism Place the small one-arm servo horn onto the servo spline so that it's pointing across the servo body, not away from it. This allows the servo to reach the little pocket we've built and actuate the slider. This is the tricky part; you have to play around with the Arduino code to calibrate your servo for its switch track. These servos are mass-produced as cheaply as possible, so the actual physical position of the horn at the 0 and 180 degree endpoints will vary somewhat from unit to unit. For my servo, the two positions the servo should move to for a closed and an open switch are about 83 degrees and 113 degrees, respectively. The corner tile should barely touch the point piece when open, and should keep the point piece tight against the outside track piece without the servo struggling or forcing itself out of position. I made some minor improvements to this code for my demonstrator - the servo doesn't sweep between positions, but jumps between them, so it's faster to actuate. I also have the Arduino disconnecting the servo in between movements so it doesn't 'hum' while waiting to move to the next position. General improvements to this model would include building the mechanism out of DBG and black for the servo holder, as well as tidying up the wiring to the servo. The servo horns stand out quite a bit color-wise, but since they're nylon, they could easily be dyed black to match the servo housing, and the silver-colored screws that come with the servo horns could be touched up with some paint or nail polish to turn them black as well. The only downside to this mechanism is that you can't run a train backwards through the straight part of the switch when it's closed, since the point piece can't move out of the way. Since this is already being controlled by a microcontroller, it wouldn't be difficult at all to add some sort of sensor that would open the switch when a train is approaching it from the wrong side. As for overall cost, beyond the price for the pieces needed to build this barebones mechanism (I had all of the pieces in my collection): I bought a ten-pack of these servos for $2 apiece, and if you don't already have one, a small Arduino starter kit can be found online for $25. The Arduino Uno has six analog pins, so it can potentially control up to six servos at once. If you're starting out from scratch, the total cost for six motorized switches would end up being around $37 - which is much cheaper than the ~$125 it would take to build this out of genuine Lego parts (one battery box, six M-motors, three IR receivers, three IR remotes), and it doesn't take any PF channels.
  10. Inspired by Lego's Ferrari 599 and Enzo models, I've created something 'beefier' . Main characteristics: Measurements - 50 cm (L), 25 cm (W) and 15 cm (H). Weighs 2.5 kg. All wheel drive (AWD) with 3 open differentials. Full independent suspension. Steering - KPI, Caster, Progressive Camber, sharp steering up to 40 degrees. Towerpro MG995 Servo. Powered by a brushless 4370KV motor at 9 volts . For fun and laughter .
  11. A Swing Ride, one of the most popular ride in the world. It use chains for the chairs like the real one. Inside the central support there is a xl motor that rotate and incline the top circular support. Then the centrifugal force do the rest of the movements. You can see it working here:
  12. The origins of the idea: The core of this model consists of three rings which can independently rotate around three perpendicular axes. These pivoted rings are called gimbals. Gimbals have been used in a wide variety of engineering applications since ancient times till modern days. Gimbal suspension is used to provide stability to objects inside unstable environment, e.g. compasses on ships and gyroscopes on planes. Furthermore, the simplicity and effectiveness of gimbals often attracted artists' attention. In science fiction and fantasy, gimbals have been used to represent complex contraptions capable of creating new physical effects and even manipulating the very fabric of reality. Some of the examples include the machine from the 1997 movie Contact, the gravity drive from the movie Event Horizon, mass relays from the video game series Mass Effect and even the Time-Turner from the movie Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. LEGO implementation: The idea of this model is to set gimbals in motion. Complex transmission allows each of the three motors to independently operate one of the three rings. Therefore the contraption is very easy to control. The rings and the frame are perfectly rigid and secure. The design of the model is intentionally minimalistic so that it could be used as a part of larger models. Video demonstration: Simple version: There is also a simplified version of the model with only two rotating rings and one motor. It may be also actuated by hand. Video demonstration and speed test of this version: Afterword: If you like this idea, please support my project on LEGO Ideas and share it with your friends! Thank you for your attention!
  13. Hi.. everyone.. I'm a new member subscribed last week. So this is my 1st posting here. Now I want to introduce my own renovation (or remodeling) of TECHNIC 42039 racing car that is capable of 4WD and 2 or 4 speed transmission features and so on... With a desperate that I need to go finish the TECNIC 42039 racing car renovation (or remodeling) going on for several months, I start a review about the result of my 42039 renovation version 3.0. First, through the video below we will introduce an overview of 42039 renovation version 3.0. The next additional video introduces the previous version 2.2 with features of 2WD and 2-speed transmission etc. The main feature included in renovation version 3.0 are listed below. -. RC engine room hatch opening feature of the original 42039 model -. Front axle renovation for 4wheel-driving (4WD) -. The reinforcement of power transmission path to the rear wheel axis -. Optional 2 or 4-speed transmission function In the following content introduces a modification information for each part. 2 or 4-speed transmission feature For the purpose of extended range, a four-speed asynchronous sequential shift gearbox option is added, 2-speed synchronous transmission as well. (With a minimum of effort adapted in accordance with the object, 2-speed vs. 4-speed selective transmission) In particular, our 4-speed sequential gearbox is inspired by the 4-speed compact transmission that is designed by SARIEL and that of TECHNIC 42056 PORSCHE 911 GT3 RS original model. In the video below, it shows the assembly of 4-speed sequential gearbox. (Sorry, the assembly of 2-speed gearbox is not ready yet) The pros ans cons of 2-speed synchronous and 4-speed asynchrosous transmissions described herein are appreciated as follows Division 2-speed synchronous 4-speed asynchronous High torque drive suitable inadequate Shift range narrow wide-range Shifting function stability low hight In conclusion, Choose 2-speed synchronous transmission, if you seek to improve the driving force Choose 4-speed asynchronous transmission, if you pursue a variety of speed and a technical completeness The challenge is 3 or 4 speed synchronous transmission upgrade. 42039 chassis renovated Sometimes with rear-wheel axis of the original 42039 models, transmission gears are impatient for a large force drastic departure or steep slopes in the progress of strong torque being transmitted to the rear wheel through a transmission shaft. So as to compensate for this problem in the renovated version, the rear-wheel axis structure has changed as the following video. The renovated 4WD front axis is at the heart of the renovated version 3.0. In other words, it describes the steering and front wheel drive shaft modifications as possible at the same time. The under-body of the renovated version compared to that of the original 42039 model is modified as follows -. Fake engine is replaced by 4-speed gearbox -. S- motor mounted under the hood -. Installations of the renovated chassis etc. In the video below you can see the renovated chassis production process using four L-motors. The final assembly process By combining each part-specific modifications result described above, the following video of the last shows the final assembly process of 4WD 42039 racecar bodywork. By finishing the renovation of RC motorized 4WD racing car, I could try another renovation with 42056 PORSCHE 911... I hope to introduce the renovated version of 42056 in the near future.. Thanks to you all reading this review to the end... Bye
  14. Hi everyone, Here's my modification of Lego Technic 42024 Container Truck set. In addition to original functions (steering, outriggers and container lifting) it has: - 6x4 driving, - 90° tilting of the driver's cabin, - Working & tilting steering wheel, - Fake V8 engine (working), - Led lights, and is completely remote controlled. I used: - 1 L-motor for 6x4 driving - 1 Servo motor for steering - 1 M-motor for outriggers - 1 M-motor for lifting the container - 1 M-motor for tilting the cabin - 1 rechargeable battery box - 3 IR receivers - 1 set of led lights - 1 x 20 cm extension cable Bricksafe: http://bricksafe.com/pages/Chilekesh/42024-rc (*.lxf file can be found here). Rebrickable: http://rebrickable.com/mocs/Chilekesh/42024-container-truck-motorized-rc Any suggestions on improvements are very welcome. Cheers and happy building!
  15. Hi everyone, Here's my modification of 8416, fully motorized and remote controlled. An additional function is the working & tilting steering wheel. The PF elements used are: - 1 M-motor for driving - 1 Servo motor for steering - 1 M-motor for lifting - 1 M-motor for tilting the lifting assembly. - 2 IR receivers - 1 Rechargeable battery box Rebrickable: http://rebrickable.com/mocs/Chilekesh/8416-fork-lift-motorized-rc Bricksafe: http://bricksafe.com/pages/Chilekesh/8416-motorized (*.lxf file can be downloaded here). Any suggestions on improvements are very welcome. Happy building!
  16. Last month marked the second anniversary of my YouTube channel, so I decided to recreate the first video I posted: a high-speed Sport Utility Vehicle. In different ways, my production skills have improved, and in other ways, not as much. I think I still have a lot to work on... do you guys have any suggestions? I'd like to know how my videos are perceived. Thanks to all who have been watching my videos and have subscribed!
  17. Hi there, I just wanted to interact a little more with the community and I thought I would start by sharing my Lego model I designed and built based on my favorite carnival ride; The Tilt-A-Whirl. However, my model doesn't tilt, and the cars don't spin freely, and in fact they are connected to a gearing system so they are always turning while the ride is in motion. This was done because I really like to add motion to my Lego models, and allowing the cars to spin freely was't providing a lot of action. The deisgn on the ride has a platform planetary gear system that revolves around a single solar gear seen here in the center of the ride pavillion Here is a shot of the underside of the platform that shows the gears that move while the platform spins around the fixed gear. After marrying the platform to the base, the result looks something like this And in its current state, operates like this The first design could only be operated by hand (and at a time when I owned a really crappy camera) I then added a Lego motor, and after a bit of trial-and-error on how to attach it, found that using a worm gear to drive the entire platform was ideal. Finally, I submitted it to Lego for consideration to become a real mode at their Cuusoo site: http://lego.cuusoo.c...deas/view/18203 I hope that you like it and let me know what you think.
  18. Do you want to do ropes ? I have a solution ! I want to precise this braiding is not 100% reliable. Sometimes, a coil can block the machine. After the first prototype, I done a lot of modifications to have the best reliability, but I have not so mutch experience with this type of MOCs, and a V2 is necessary to upgrade this creation. There is a clutch to stop this machine if it is blocked. The objective was to do a braiding machine having a continuous operation, and to have a not too low speed. I had not objective concerning the number of strings. There are 8 strings + 1 central. I also really wanted a buttom to be drawn to start te machine and down to stop it. How does it work ? You can separate this machine in 3 parts : The braided wire winder The rotation of the trays The movement of the arms moving the coils You can have more tight braids by changing a gear ratio of the winder. But they are less beautiful. The rotation of the trays occupies the top of the machine. (The 24t that you can see can be easily used to coordinate the arms and the trays) Here you can see the mechanism of the arms : The linear clutch stops the machine if a coil blocks it. More picture here : http://www.techlug.f...43.html#p179043 The difficulty was to coordinate all the mechanisms and to counter stress and flexion of the parts for the machine can work without too much fails. Finally, the machine can be locked because of a coil, but I’m satisfied because it works correctly and the braids are very regular. I’ll done other MOCs of this type because I like it ! The video will show you the operation :
  19. Hi! I was very impressed by new 42054 set so I’ve decided to motorize it. The chassis was completely replaced but the body is the same like in the official set. There are four motorized functions in my model: AWD, front and rear steering and cab rotation. Also I’ve added electric PTO for outer RC attachments. I plan to create new rig in the near future. Let’s see my MOD in action: A few photos: New transmission: BB switch as in original set: Electric PTO: Thanks for watching! I hope you like it :)
  20. I've bought PF servo motor about one year ago and I haven't got chance to test it. Then this ugly buggy 42037 appeared and I realized it's good volunteer for testing it. My goal was to make it fully remote controlled with adding just PF parts and keeping original look as much as possible. So after two days I've got this result. It's powered by one M-motor, steered by servo motor and even uglier than before. It rides well on smooth and solid surfaces but it's pretty slow on carpet. Main issue was to find room for battery box. Front of buggy is almost unchanged and rear is rebuilt much. It can still open cab and fake engine works. It lost just seat and lights. If anyone is interested I'll share its LDD file.
  21. Hello everyone! This is my newest creation: It is a result of a strange process - I usually know what I want to build before I start building, but with this one it wasn't the case. I was tinkering about limited slip differentials – trying to find some compact solution, one that can fit regular LEGO differential. Then I needed some vehicle to test it… One thing led to another and I had this top fuel dragster on my desk. It is build for speed - has great power (RC 5292 motor) to weight ratio (weighs 450g). It is rather simple creation. The only function, besides motorized driving and steering (servo motor), is manually adjustable rear wing. Dimensions: 48cm long, 12 cm wide, 14.5 – 16 cm high I hope you'll like it! More photos: http://www.flickr.co...157669238024110 Please check the video to see more about its speed - after all, it is the main feature of this model (I filmed it in my building's garage - my apartment is too small for that thing ) and tell me what you think about that limited slip diff. Also, now I'm wondering, do you always know what are you going to build from the start or did you have similar experience like me with this MOC?
  22. Hi all, i've just arrived at the forum, very nice place. I'm mainly into building and customizing lego tecnic, got 42008, 42009, 42035, 42043, also i've build some parts to build 42009 ultimate (haven't arrived yet, looking forward to this) and planing on getting a 42006 and some parts to fully motorize and rc it. I'm also looking for some custom builds using those sets and to motorize and rc them, will dig around the site, to get a nice idea on customizing, and them i'm planning on starting trying my own (looks pretty difficult at the start, hope to get the hang of it). Goog luck all, plz don't hesitate to contact me if i can be of any help, or if you have anything to share related do rc and motorizing these and other related models, i'm looking for some free manuals and tips to have some fun, but i'm also willing to pay for some good instructions that will help tune those babes, as well as help get experienced in modding. Regards, cya all.
  23. its been a while since I posted so I decided I'd post 2x the content. Focus was on maximum motorized functions including front rear clam shell, doors, shifting (via broken servo motor), 2 speed transmission, steering, sbrick and drive. Enjoy! Youtube: Flicker: https://flic.kr/s/aHskAxCnKJ To see the different build styles, Lox built the red supercar, and Dugald built the white one. The red car has actuating doors, V10, working steering wheel and rear wing when turning, 4wd & rwd. 1 servo, 2 xl for drive, 2 m-motors for opening doors, 1 Sbrick. The white car has 1 servo for steering, 2 xl for drive, 2 M-motors for doors, 1 servo for gear shifting, 1 M-motor for rear clam shell, 1 l-motor for front clam shell. Red supercar: White supercar Which one do you like best? :) Interior: Interior x2 Lox's V10 front suspension built by Dugald rear suspension built by Dugald Lox framework Dugald's bottom of car Lox's bottom view View from above: Rear wing: 2 speed transmission: I really like this front hood design Nice flow from top view: Custom seats modular design 2 servos and 1 m-motor - the broken servo sticks left and right (perfect for shifting) complete framework with 8 motors V10 and interior Under the hood: This is the axle that lifts the rear lid for the white car. Slightly too much torque
  24. I would like to present my motorized and remote controlled (IR) version of this year's Monster Truck set (42005). My first goal was to keep the overall look and dimensions the same as the official model: The wheels, chassis and body are in the same positions, Only the axles, inner workings, and battery box have changed. My second goal was to somehow get the vehicle to have both steering and 4WD: As you can see above, I achieved the steering by making the entire front and rear axles turn via the use of gear racks and 6L links, while the drive goes through the ball joints, differentials, and portal hubs. Steering is handled by a PF Servo Motor, while drive is handled by a PF L motor. It is powered by a PF Rechargeable Battery, and a PF IR Receiver V2. My third goal was to increase the vehicles clearance as much as possible: And my last goal was to maintain a good amount of articulation: I had to modify the suspension attachment to allow an extra degree of movement to allow the suspension to operate smoothly. It runs quite well over small obstacles, however it is very top-heavy, so it does roll over quite easily. This isn't helped by the fact that as it turns, it leans outwards (opposite to how a skateboard works). Here are the parts (guts) that I had to remove from the original model: All pictures can be clicked on for larger versions at Brickshelf (once moderated). Here are some more pics: And last but not least, here is a link to the LDraw file: 42005_motorized_monster_truck.mpd Overall I am pleased that I was able to get this motorized given that there was only a small space to work with, and the model is very sturdy. I hope you like my motorized and RC 42005 Monster Truck. Any and all feedback/constructive criticism welcome. Edit: I have submitted this MOC to Rebrickable. Edit: I have created a quick video: Sorry about the audio quality - it was a very windy day!
  25. Full Album: http://imgur.com/a/YdL5x Specifics: 4x L Motors RWD (Geared Up 1.2x) Full Independent Suspensions 6x Shock Absorbers 2x AA Battery Box 2x V2 IR Receivers Frontal Led Lights Differential Weight: 1250g (with batteries) The Idea is to create an Heavy-Weight Buggy with good performances using no expensive pieces (Buggy Motors, SBrick..). The final speed is acceptable, the torque has some difficulties in uphill but for the plain is sufficient, and the maximum speed is reached quickly. I called it Fury Road because it reminds me so much the style of Mad Max vehicles. I know it's a little be "naked" but I like it in this way. I putted in it some lateral exhaust pipes, a little spoiler, a cabin and some lights to improve the aesthetics. I tried to put the IR receivers in a position that seems a big engine that comes out. Hope you like it! ;)