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Found 37 results

  1. Missed out on the Lego Emerald Night. I reckon that I should build my own steam locomotive instead of getting one on the market. After few months of bricks purchases, precious advice from fellow Eurobrick members(e.g. Motor power functions Torgue, learned about quartering technique), and several rounds of reworks and modification, it is finally completed! Sharing my 8-wide build Santa Fe 4-4-2 "Atlantic" Locomotive, with Cargo Wagon and Passenger Car. Hope you guys like it! Train: Santa Fe 4-4-2 "Atlantic" Locomotive Specs: Engine [8-Wide]. Tender [7-wide], Cargo Wagon [8-wide], Passenger Car [8-wide] Power functions: 1 x XL-Motor, 1 x Power Function Light (Front Lamp and Rear Boiler), 1 x AAA Battery Pack, 1 x IR Receiver, 1 x Extension Wire This is the one of the only few photos of ATSF which I can find for reference during my build:
  2. Hello! I have been a member for a while and first jumped into Eurobricks with a tread about my Rise from the Dark Ages full of all the things I had be building in LDD. Now I present to you, the locomotive that started my whole enlightenment in the first place. The Union Pacific 4000 class. I chose to number mine after 4017 which is on display in Green Bay, Wisconsin since that is the one I have gone to see. If you poke around my Flickr long enough you might be able to find some earlier versions than the one you see in the photos below. I'm sorry I do not have professional photos this engine made its debut at the last NILTC show this past weekend. They were gracious enough to let me join them. I know some of them took a whole lot more photos and videos than I but here are a few that I have. Coaster was there and it was a real treat to see this run through his custom R104 double cross-over. For some interesting notes: The version in brick is 8.4. That is I have almost completely rebuilt this 8 times in LDD and have made 4 minor revisions. This engine has 2 XL motors in the boiler and is geared to the same as the Emerald Night. BrickStuff lighting gear lights up the head light, the front marker lights, the cab, and the rear red light on the back of the tender. I do plan to do a proper photo-shoot but I am moving soon so it will not take place until some time this summer. In the mean time...enjoy!! I would love to hear all comments and critiques. This next is not very good, but it handles curves just fine. I'm sorry I don't have any videos yet...but I have one and will post it later. I hope you enjoy and I will update once I have had time for a proper photo-shoot!
  3. This engine is modeled after the GE 44 ton switcher locomotive. Why 44 tons, you may ask? I give you the answer from the Wikipedia article on this loco type: This locomotive's specific 44-short ton weight was directly related to one of the efficiencies the new diesel locomotives offered compared to their steam counterparts: reduced labor intensity. In the 1940s, the steam to diesel transition was in its infancy in North America, and railroad unions were trying to protect the locomotive fireman jobs that were redundant with diesel units. One measure taken to this end was the 1937 so-called "90,000 Pound Rule" :[citation needed] a stipulation that locomotives weighing 90,000 pounds (41,000 kg) – 45 short tons – or more required a fireman in addition to an engineer on common carrier railroads. Industrial and military railroads had no such stipulation. The 44-ton locomotive was born to skirt this requirement. The loco is bi-directional, and doesn't have much to differentiate between the "front" or "rear" expect for the air horn and exhaust stack on one end in real life. My LEGO model lacks these, so it's only way to tell which is front is by the headlights: clear for front, red for rear. I am going to name this loco WFP number 7007. (WFP stands for Wabash Frisco & Pacific, which is the name of a 12 inch gauge ride-on railway in St. Louis, MO.) They don't have a real 44 toner there, but do have a Fairbanks Morse H10-44 (number 704) in the same color scheme, so I made this engine as a companion to the H10-44. In the spoiler tag below, you will find a real life picture of a 44-toner loco. (I got the picture from railpictures.net, It is NOT mine!) Just for comparison purposes, here is the H10-44 I was talking about. NOTE: The H10-44 is NOT included in the GE 44-ton's LDD file! The (updated) LDD file for the GE loco is available here. Build updated 3-14-17 with a better 44 ton GE unit, courtesy of Henry Durand over on Facebook's LEGO Train Fan Club. Thanks Henry! Comments, Questions, suggestions and complaints are always welcome!
  4. Hello, This is my first MOC in EB Train Tech however I've been following this forum since years (building some other MOCs you can find in my Flickr photo gallery). First of all, thank you guys for inspiration :) I really enjoy my time reading your posts. Erie Triplex was already built by Shuppiluliumas, and by Lego Train 12 Volt, really great models! (sorry if I missed other creators) I tried to do my own recreation of this distinguished loco. Please have a look and comment. I decided to use sand green + flat silver curved slopes, added a bit of glamour with few extra gold chromed parts :) Dimensions and PF: Length: 82 studs Width: 10 studs Height: 11 bricks PF: 3x L-motors + Sbrick controller + 88000 battery Weight: 1,6kg Non-standard solution and technics:: 1. To add more realism I used well-known rods from Zephyr (TrainedBricks http://www.bricklink.com/store/home.page?p=zephyr ) 2. SBrick ( http://sbrick.com ) 3. Chromed parts from Aurimax ( Chrome Block City http://www.bricklink.com/store/home.page?p=Aurimax ) 4. Trimmed technic axle (BL #6587) to connect rods with wheels (I know the solution how to connect it in proper Lego way, but this change is on my to-do list ) 5. Bullfrog Snot on 2 pairs of wheels ( http://www.bullfrogsnot.com/faq.asp ) but finally I decided to add white o-rings 6. Stickers Lady in black & white Movie Cheers
  5. (NOTE: This model will be built when funding allows, hopefully by the middle of this year!) Inspired by set 149 (Fuel Refinery) from 1976 as seen above (pic from BrickSet), this model takes the 4.5v era Shell refinery and turns it into a diesel locomotive / oil burning steam engine fuel depot for the modern PF age. The model features two floors with removable roof sections, and is updated for 2017 parts-wise. The included truck is inspired by set 10184 (Town Plan), and features two four opening storage compartments and two side doors for the driver. NOTE: This part goes above both ends of the locomotive refueling bay. while this part here replaces the 2 x 4 x 3 brick on the wall. The upper floor of the depot features a control station for monitoring the flow of fuel from the tanks on the roof to the service bay, or from the tanker truck to the storage tanks. The roof of the facility comes off in two sections. The upper floor features a opening door to the tanks and staircase to the lower floor and the flow-monitoring systems. The locomotive bay is tall enough to let any official car through, including the double stacked container car from the Maersk train... this car is NOT included in the LDD file, by the way. I think my brother may originally have built this truck, but I'm not 100% sure where it came from as it's been on my computer for about three years. The driver's doors open, and so do all four storage compartments. This truck fits one driver figure. The LDD file for the truck and fuel depot is here. As usual, Comments, Questions, Suggestions & Complaints are always welcome!
  6. This 2-6-2 Prairie type engine was inspired by the My Own Train series of 2001 and a boiler from set 79111 (Constitution Train Chase). The passenger coaches and baggage car were inspired by set 10015 (Passenger Wagon), and set 10194 (Emerald Night). They feature no interior but all three passenger cars have four opening doors. The baggage car has two opening doors, two sliding panel-doors and an "exploding" back wall inspired by set 79111. (Constitution Train Chase). The whole train together. Here we can see the rear of the train with the back wall (and dynamite) still in place. (You may notice the baggage car is a modified version of the green Western jail car I already have built) The yellow 1 x 4 bricks used are actually supposed to be green printed bricks with this on them. The tender features a coal bunker, and water tank, plus a ladder at the rear for accesses to the passenger train. The cab features a firebox door (a 2 x 2 round tile) and two printed gauge tiles. The coaches were inspired by set 10015 (Passenger Wagon), and set 10194 (Emerald Night). They feature no interior but all three passenger cars have four opening doors. The exploding baggage car was originally the Jail car from set 79111. (Constitution Train Chase) while gaining the styling of set 10015 (Passenger Wagon) and doors from 10194. (Emerald Night) This car has one play feature that is sure to blow you away: the back wall can be removed to get at the baggage compartment via the "dynamite" on the outside of the back wall. (actually, the roof top lever knocks the wall loose) Then your train robbers can make off with whatever valuable are inside! As usual, the LDD file for the whole train is seen here while the loco and tender by themselves are here. Comments, Questions, Complaints, & Suggestions are always welcome. This train is on my to-do list, but won't be built for a while... maybe this summer?
  7. Howdy! This is an update of a post I made earlier this year of a Durango & Silverton K-36 narrow gauge locomotive. I recently decided to submit this MOC to the Lego Ideas website as an effort to get Lego to produce more quality train sets. I shared my project with the good people at the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, and I have been blessed to receive their full support and endorsement of my efforts. I consider the D&SNGR to be the finest railroad experience in the country, if not the world. If you haven't had the good fortune to ride with them, do yourself a favor and make plans to go as soon as possible. You will not be disappointed. Check out their Facebook page for information about the railroad and a look at their endorsement of this MOC. https://www.facebook.com/DSNGRR/ If you are passionate about Lego trains, as I am, please visit the Lego Ideas website and show your support for this MOC. Help me convince Lego to make this dream a reality and immortalize the great D&SNGR with the world's greatest toy! https://ideas.lego.com/projects/161449 Back to the MOC. Let's start with the engine. I am not a fan of Lego Digital Designer, so all of my MOCs are built through a trial and error evolutionary process. This is the first picture I stopped to take of the locomotive. By this point, I had nailed down the frame, wheels, and the driving mechanism. I opted for including all the power functions elements in the locomotive rather than the tender. Working on hiding the power functions. Taking shape Experimenting with the stack and the headlight. Finalizing front end. On to the cab. Getting close. Power functions access from the top. The motor makes a nice firebox. A glimpse of how the wheels are powered. Done! Now for a look at the evolution of the passenger car. Finally settling on the SNOT technique for duplicating the look of wood panels and windows with depth. Placing a horizontal stripe in the middle of vertically striped plates was a fun challenge. I eventually found a way to suspend the upper non window portions from the ceiling. I really enjoyed building this car. All done! I didn't really take any pictures of the caboose process. I essentially used the same techniques from the passenger car. The inside is pretty ugly though, as I only had so many pieces available in this color of red. Now for a few shots of the train all together! How about a little scenery? From the good folks at the Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad! I took the train to Brickfair in Birmingham, Alabama, and it won staff favorite! Kids loved the bear in the cave. Brickfair is a blast. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in Lego or anyone with kids.
  8. This 4-8-0 "Mastodon" type steam engine & it's six car freight train are hauling generic cargo on it's way to Anywhere, USA. This engine model was first built as a 2-8-2 Mikado (with running gear derived from Scotnick's 2-10-0 Decapod 9F) before having the front pony truck removed and a 4 wheel bogie from set 10194 (Emerald Night) added instead, turning it into a 4-8-0 Mastodon - type. The rear pony truck was removed as well, with the 79111-style boiler shortened and cab re-arranged. Together, these several different engines from four different eras and four separate builders come together to create this one 4-8-0 "Mastodon" type steam engine The coal tender was inspired by Anthony Sava's Pacific 4-6-2 model's oil tender with the letters "BRS" added in the middle of the tender using printed 1 x 1 tiles. I think the loco is much better proportioned to the tender now than before. In my fictional universe, the engine above pulls a generic mid-1900's freight train. This train consists of the following models: This drop side flat car was first part of set 2126 (Train Cars), but it didn't really have a purpose. It was hauling uprooted evergreen trees in the set, but that didn't look very good, so I changed it to generic freight. (My resident hobo usually catches a ride on this car.) This tanker car was inspired by set 7939 (Cargo Train, 2010 version) and by Anthony Sava's recent pick-a-brick MOC-up tanker car. (seen here.) I was inspired by this photo by JB Lego to build this boxcar (seen here ) They are made to haul generic freight, such as anything from unfinished car parts to prized paintings... and yes, the doors do open! Inspired by the green tractor trailer from CITY set 4204 (The Mine), this bathtub gondola is carrying boulders from the mine destined for the gold refinery where they will be opened up and the metal extracted to make coins and ingots. I have adapted this UK inspired model of a brake van by Fireglo450 (see it here ) to be a more American inspired caboose. The caboose has no interior, and the red marker light can go on either end of the model to represent the end of whatever train it is being hauled behind.
  9. Hi everyone! A little while since I completed and posted my creations. Winter is here, and Christmas is coming, and I think it is time to do something for my winter village. Here is my first try on making a train MOC, and it is an interesting building journey. I have looked at different beautiful locomotive engines online and created my version with a little seasonal deco. I don't want this to be a funny, cartoon Christmas tree, but a formal and decent express train going between the city and the winter village. The engine is the part that took me most time to create. I had the basic form in my head, but the mechanism and details actually required quite some understanding of the actual old locomotives. Luckily, the green Emerald Train gave me much hint and so I ended up with this: I added some interesting details to the front bumper part, using the claw pieces. I also tried a "tilted bottle" arrangement for the chimney part. The engine probably runs on diesel as there is no coal section. The wagon car follows the engine, and that is how you get your presents at the winter village! Freshly delivered from the city center! The passenger car is a simple one with all you need: doors and windows, and a streamlined profile. It looks like it has warm air supply already for your long journey through the winter: The last car is a mail car. Of course, you need to deliver a lot of parcels and Christmas cards to the villagers from the city. So, have we arrived yet? Yes, this is it! Hope you guys like it! :D Have a merry Christmas! ;)
  10. Greetings All, Apologies for being very late to the party, but the TC10 pneumatic competition brings together my favourite parts of what technic is all about and I really wanted to contribute. A number of years ago I had to good fortune to come across a big bunch of pneumatic parts. Having worked on all sorts of pneumatic based MOC's my beloved wife put out the challenge to build her a steam train thus beginning a five year odyssey before finally arriving at the model I present to you all today. Creating a genuinely functioning Lego Pneumatic Locomotive has been a real challenge, searching the internet brings up very few examples. Creating a valve assembly that is both functional and reasonably robust within the confines of lego has proven quite the challenge. Rather than completely reinventing the wheel, I have based my model on a simplified version of Walschaerts Valve Gear that was used on many steam trains through history. I set out at the start of this competition to make a fully reversible valve gear as per the real thing but it proved too much of a challenge at this stage - see how the next few years pans out. The Model: Classic 4-8-2 locomotive configuration using 62.4 tyres for driving wheels old style clear pneumatic cylinders for drive old style pneumatic valves Six manually operated pneumatic pumps - this thing need lots of air. All parts use are original, unmodified, genuine Lego items. The reason I have used "old" style valves is that they are the ones that I could find with minimal resistance, allowing the whole system to function property. Starting with the final result for those of us into instant gratification; This is the final interpretation of my pneumatic locomotive. I will, however make you scroll further for the video. The key to the success of this model is has been in effectively copying the principals behind the walschaerts valve system where the throw of the valves is delayed by the eccentric on the main driving wheel. It is only once the piston ( pneumatic cylinder) has reached the end of it's stroke that the valve is thrown in the opposite direction to push it back the other way. The two valve trains on either side of the loco are offset by 90 degrees so that they "help" each other past the dead spot at the limits of each cylinder's stroke. No matter what I tried, the fundamental principal was "More Steam Coalmam!' In manual form, 6 pumps are required to provide adequate air supply. Four air reservoirs for the testing phase and three in the final model smooth the pulses from six manual pumps to a point that we have reasonably smooth motion. Lucky last, a brief video showing how it works. I'll try to post an ldraw of the basic mechanism in the not too distant future but instructions are well outside my current skill set. If you've got this far, thanks very much for taking the time, I hope it's proven interesting. The Brown Hornet
  11. The two streamlined engines seen here are a GG-1 electric loco and a 4-6-2 Pacific type steamer. The coaches are inspired by train sets 7715 / 7718 from the 4.5 Volt era in the early to mid 1980's. The railroad that owns this train is the Lego-Land Central, and runs the train from World City to Heartlake City with stops at Classic Town, Paradisia Coast, Duplo-Ville, Ninjago City, (where the electric loco is replaced by a steamer or vise versa for the rest of the trip) Fabu-Land, Technic Town, Fort Legoredo and the Castle Realm. (with extensions into the Forest of Failed Themes and the Outer Dimension of Galidor at certain times of the year.) The rear of the train which is painted in this fictional blue and red color scheme. The doors should be printed like these: door part 1 and door part 2 The GG-1 was a class of electric locomotives built for the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) for use in the northeastern United States. 139 GG-1s were constructed by General Electric and PRR's Altoona Works from 1934 to 1943, although mine is used by Lego-Land Central.. The loco features Anthony Sava's sliding middle axle design. This means the middle axle out of the three on the bogie closest to the middle of the loco slide laterally back and forth to allow the engine over switches and curves that would be normally to tight to maneuver. These special bogies are used twice of course: one for each half of the loco. The two outer wheels closest to each end are connected to the inner bogies via cup-and-ball parts. This allows them to swing freely and not bind up while still representing the right amount of wheels for a GG-1 loco. The engine features moving panto-graphs for picking up (imaginary) electricity from the overhead wires. They are both in the raised position here, though normally the rear one would be used. The exception to this was if the rear panto-graph was knocked off or damaged by overhanging debris, which the engine would then have it's lead panto-graph raised in order to limp the the repair shop. The letters "LLC" (standing for Lego-Land Central) go on the middle section of the engine while 1933 goes on the engine ends in four spots made of printed 1 x 1 tiles. (This is the year the Lego company was founded.) This engine is a 4-6-2, which means it has four leading, six driving, and two trailing wheels. The locomotive is streamlined steam locomotive with a shell around the boiler. The model was inspired by user Brickblues and his Mallard-style steam locomotive. The cab of the loco is supposed to feature a firebox door and 1 x 1 gauge tiles like this. The tender sides should say 'Lego-Land Central" in printed 1 x 1 tiles and "1958" and the cab sides. (The reason for 1958 is that Town Plan started at this time.) NOTE: This train is a WIP: the GG-1 is almost finished (need number tiles) while the coaches are 85% there. The rest of the needed parts and the steamer should be done eventually.... maybe by January 1st at the earliest. Until then, here's the LDD file. Comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome!
  12. The Spirit of Legoredo was my one of my first big trains, and was built in 2011 with a baggage car, three passenger coaches, and observation car. It looked good to me at first, in nearly all black with a red stripe at the base, but over the years was quietly forgotten about, as it was quite dull-looking and hard to take pictures of. Then I switched magnet types to the newer ones, and it became even harder show off as it didn't match the rest of my newer train fleet. Eventually, the baggage car was scrapped, as the train with it's longer 28-stud base plates would not fit in my boxes with the locomotives with five cars. That will soon change though... First off, this diesel model was inspired by Valgarise and his model called "Invencible". It looked like an nice big ALCO model (and in the right colors too!) so I built it and a booster unit sometime in 2014. Since last uploading this model, I changed the grille bricks from black to dark bluish gray in order to make the engine stand out more. I also edited the short hand rails to be three studs long instead of four. The rear of the loco. The locomotive is supposed to be a American Locomotive Company (ALCO for short) diesel two unit semi-permanently coupled set. However, several differences exist between the real world and the model, so it's not a exact match. The rear of the train features four 1 x 2 macaroni bricks as the back window's curved glass. Here we see the redesigned cars which are more colorful with a red stripe around the windows down the length of the train. The whole train together. NOTE: These updates will happen probably after Christmas, but rest assured it will be finished by January / February. Here are the LDD files for the above models. ...for the engine: http://www.moc-pages...1473611680m.lxf ...for the whole train: http://www.moc-pages...1473611473m.lxf Comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome!
  13. After some conversation in another thread I realized I haven't posted any of my more recent builds on here, including one of my boxcab electric locomotives. I figured I would put some details about both of my New Haven electric locomotives, since both fit this category. Many of you may have seen these on Flickr or at shows but I presume that many of you haven't seen them yet, though I could be wrong. First up is the newest one, my New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad (NYNH&H) EF-1: The EF-1 class was built in 1912 by Baldwin-Westinghouse and remained in service until 1957 (outlasting their "successors," the EF-2's by 9 years). The were frequently used on the New York Connecting Railroad (a joint venture to connect the New Haven and Pennsylvania Railroads) hauling freight from New England to the Long Island Rail Road's transfer bridges in Brooklyn, NY. Due to the grades on this route they were typically operated in triple, and I've even seen a photo of four of them hauling a long freight over the Hell Gate Bridge. The model is equipped with two PF train motors which power the four large drivers, and Brickstuff lights in the main headlight and four front marker lights. Contrary to everything I've read on here, I've had no problems using large drivers on a PF train motor (well, none yet). My plan is to build freight cars until this can no longer haul any more, then build a second and repeat until I have three of them. My second (well, first) boxcab electric is my NYNH&H EP-3: The EP-3 class was built by General Electric in 1931, and featured both pantographs and third rail shoes so they could run into either Grand Central Terminal or Pennsylvania Station in New York. The EP-3s performed so well that the Pennsylvania railroad borrowed three of them for tests that resulted in the design of the world famous GG1. As with my EF-1 this uses two PF train motors powering eight of the large drivers, and was able to keep considerable speed at Brickworld this past summer with five heavy passenger cars in tow: New Haven Meet at Brickworld Chicago Also I'm working on a NYNH&H EP-2, which is still very much of a WIP: Cheers!
  14. Confession: I have been wanting to build a Bipolar for a long time, about four years. Longer than the Daylight or my Aerotrain models have been around, even on my computer, and longer than most of my 80+ strong fleet. Now, after years of waiting and thinking, designing and red developing: it is here! But first, here is what it's based on: The Real life inspiration: (Photo from Wikipedia) Real life inspiration: From 1919 to 1962, the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (known as the Milwaukee Road) had these five General Electric-made behemoths pulling trains under the wires from Chicago to Seattle. They were called the Bipolar's for each of the locomotive's 12 motors had only two field poles, mounted directly to the locomotive frame beside the axle. The motor armature was mounted directly on the axle, providing an entirely gear-less design. These locos were so powerful they could out-pull modern steam locos, and what used to take two steamers took just one bipolar. However, after a disastrous 1953 rebuilding by the railroad's company shops (who had no clue how to work on a electric loco) the engines were prone to failures and even fire. And so, in 1962, four of them were scrapped with the lone survivor, numbered E-2, towed to the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis Missouri, where it has sat silent even since. LEGO Model: This model was inspired by a 1999 version of the engine built by user legosteveb. I recreated the actual orange, red and black color scheme used on the loco when it emerged from that 1953 modernization program, but it was too expensive. So, after looking around I decided to use the paint scheme the Milwaukee Road used when the engine was donated. This yellow and red scheme was inspired by the Union Pacific and was adopted very late in the engine's career (mid-50's). Also, the number board in front (and rear) should say "E2" in printed 1 x 1 tiles. The loco is split in three sections as per the original engine. The front and rear section can pivot slightly to make the engine go around curves. The wheels are jointed to the frame at the three wheel segments, with a center section all by itself. The swinging three axle design is by Anthony Sava. Here is Steve's original model from 1999. ...and here is my ldd file: LDD file for the electric loco Comments, Questions and complaints welcome! EDITED 10/16/16: Added new pictures and updated ldd file to the main post.
  15. MODS: the last topic i made on this train was long ago (2013) I thought that making a new one instead of resurrecting an old one and updating it would be better... though I could be wrong. if so, I am sorry for any trouble I have caused! The locomotive is a American Locomotive Company (ALCO for short) diesel two unit semi-permanently coupled set, with both engines assigned the same number. The front unit where the engineer sits is called a Cab (or A) unit, while the trailing unit is called a Booster (or B) unit, though they can be used in more groups than just two, like a an A-B-B-A set as used on the real life Santa Fe Super Chief, among many other trains. This feature was not unique to the ALCO family, as Baldwin, EMD, and many smaller makers such as Fairbanks - Morse did so too. However, sometimes different companies' types were difficult (or impossible) to connect together because of placement of Multiple Unit control hoses / ports. (Like a ALCO A unit leading a Baldwin B unit, a Fairbanks Morse B Unit and a EMD A unit at the rear... though it would be something to see!) This model was inspired by Valgarise and his model called "Invencible". It looked like an nice big ALCO model (and in the right colors for my railroad too!) so I built it and a booster unit sometime in early 2014 / late 2013, but i finally got around to taking decent pictures of it today! The rear of the model features the older 9v era magnets, as this loco and it's corresponding train have not been updated in some time though it's on my to-do list. The front of the loco features a single headlight and no magnet for coupling trains to the head of the engine. Their is a cool looking red stripe though! The nose of the engine as designed Flickr user Valgarise was lacking number boards, so I added some. Here you can see how I attached the nose to the rest of the loco. Here is my original inspiration by Valgarise. More awesome pictures are available in his photo stream here: https://www.flickr.c...157627755617169 Their is no LDD file for this engine at the moment, though one could be uploaded eventually. If you have any questions, complaints, or suggestions, feel free to leave it below as any feedback would be welcome! EDIT: LDD File available here: http://www.moc-pages...1472244392m.lxf
  16. The German BR119 was developed in 1937 by AEG, Siemens Schuckertwerke. At that time it was the most powerful electric locomotive in it's time. With the outbreak of world war 2 these engines couldn't be tested and developed further and speeds where then limited to 140km/h to keep them in use. The engines were really reliable and have been used up to 1968. Many liveries of this engine excist, I choose the dark blue livery with red wheels which I think really stands out. I really love these old electric locomotives with their big wheels and huge pantographs. First of a picture of the real engine; And my version (in the picture it somehow looks shorter then it really is); Making the sloped front with the 3 windows was not that easy; I choose to add the wind shield wipers to make it less plain, if only there were dark blue levers; Detail on the roof and pantographs; Apart from some rigid hose the model does not have cut or painted parts, for me this was really a must. I used some old 12V Lego stickers to add the logo's and numbers. Due to the complexity of the build it does not have an engine or lights (yet). I suppose our resident train experts would find this an easy task, but for me this is still challenging. The idea is to ad 3 coaches in the same livery, one of these will have two 9V motors. So there you have it, I hope you like it!
  17. The trains I'm going to show you use a lot of unique models to make this train setup possible, including sets 10254, 60052, 79106, 79111, and 10015 for the Army train, and 7597, 10014, and 10015 for the passenger train. (This is both a single MOC and several MODs at the same time.) These trains are also 100% build-able in real life... I haven't got the green one built, but the red one is 98% finished! They are done, so you can see them below! US 1870's MILITARY TRAIN & 4-2-4 STEAM LOCO Let's start with the newest train: the 4-2-4 and the US Army train. This is a more realistic version of set 10254 (Winter Village holiday train) for all the train fans who don't like the engine. I added working pistons, and a more cohesive color scheme plus two more sets of wheels on the engine. This is a tank engine, and as such does not have a tender. The rotating Gatling gun you see here was taken from set 79111. (Constitution Train Chase) This horse car was originally a cattle car from set 60052, (2014 Cargo Train) but I've re-purposed it for my Army officer horses. These cannons are from set 79106 (Calvary Builder Set) and were placed on a generic flatcar. for transport by rail. This coach was inspired by set 10015 (Passenger Wagon), and features no interior. T The jail car you see was originally from set 79111. (Constitution Train Chase) while gaining the styling of set 10015. (Passenger Wagon) This car has one play feature that is sure to blow you away: the back wall can be removed to get at the jail cell via the "dynamite" on the outside of the back wall. When pushed back towards the other end of the car, the rear wall pops out and the bad guys can escape! Here is the whole military train all put together. US 1870's PASSENGER TRAIN & 4-6-0 STEAM LOCO Next up, the modified passenger train which I have shown before on these forums, but has received a bit of a face-lift. This engine was originally modeled after set 7597 (Western Train Chase) with some design inspiration from TF Twitch's "Humble Sapphire" 4-4-0. The engine also features a boiler copied from set 79111 (Constitution Train Chase) to keep it inline with the rest of my steam locomotives. The rear of the loco features a ladder to the tender-top. These passenger cars were mostly inspired by set 10014 (Passenger wagon) but repainted red instead of green and with fancy part 30613 "Brick, Arch 3 x 6 x 5 Ornamented" on the end of the cars. I might be mistaken, but Ben Shuber may have been the one to inspire these coaches with his own red versions of set 10014. The end of my passenger train features this little four wheel caboose. It was designed after set 10015 (Caboose) with some features taken from set 7597 (Western Train Chase) Here is the whole passenger train all put together. US 1870's FREIGHT TRAIN & 4-4-0 STEAM LOCO Since I turned the red 4-4-0 into a 4-6-0, the slot has been opened up for another "American"-type. Thus, I created Yellow 4-4-0 number 2, to go along with red 4-6-0 number 3 and green 4-2-4 number 1. The engine is supposed to feature four of this part on the tender and cab walls where the green bricks are located: http://www.bricklink...09pb011#T=C&C=3 This log car was also designed by my brother, and is quite ingenious for using set 60059 (Logging Truck) but on a train base. The logs are floating place, as they would be resting on the bottom of the car in real life. It was quite a pain to position them into place as seen here. The flat car is heavily inspired by the one in set 3225 (Classic Train), except this version features two bogies unlike the original set. This vintage water tanker is a modified set 2126 (Train Cars) design with four wheels on the two bogies instead of two wheels stuck to the frame. Set 7597 was the original model for this boxcar, which has been made so the doors can't open.... though you can remove the handle on the side of the car and it will open fine. This caboose was inspired by set 10014 (Caboose), but my version lacks the top part of the caboose, which is traditionally called a cupola. Here is the whole train together. US 1870's LEGOREDO MODULAR TRAIN DEPOT This old railroad station was inspired by set 7594 (Woody's Roundup!) which I have named the Fort Legoredo passenger depot after the famous set number 6761. (Fort Legoredo) This railroad station was built in 1874 after the original station structure (built 1867) burned to the ground in late 1873. It was confusingly named Fort Legoredo at that time by the railroad in an attempt to persuade potential settlers that this land was protected by the army, when in fact the Federal government was planning on closing down the actual Fort Legoredo. (this plan was eventually gone through with, as the Fort ceased operations when it burned to the ground in 1885 and was not rebuilt) The station has since stood for 140+ years with only slight modifications, such as adding computer control systems to the upper floor in 1980 to control the switches and monitor train traffic to the still-active silver mines. The station also serves as the oldest building in the city and is featured heavily in tourism advertisements for the city and it's historical reproduction of the original Fort Legoredo. (the US Army base, that is) The station is modular, as the roof and second floor come off and the two side platforms come apart by means of Technic pins. This lower floor features two waiting rooms with a ticket office in-between them. This office features stairs to the upper floor. The upper floor features a vintage safe that is used to hold silver dust / nuggets that is still payable for a train ticket. The metal is weighed on the scale (seen next to the safe) to ensure it is the correct type. (Read: not fake). The newspaper contains the daily precious metals prices, so that is is fairly measured and properly payed for. Eventually a special train comes though the station and the dust / nuggets are exchanged for proper paper currency, with the expensive metal being shipped back east to Denver to be made into coins and bars. The anachronistic modern computer system was added in 1980 to control the switches and monitor train traffic to the still-active silver mines. US 1870's MODULAR COLLAPSING TRAIN BRIDGE This bridge was inspired by Bad Cop's Pursuit (set 70802) and the short section of railroad bridge included with that set. When I first saw it, I thought it would make a great play feature for a train bridge that is actually usable by trains. Here is the result of all that working and reworking: 12 sections of PF / RC train track (It won't work with 9V, sorry!) with 1 section "failure point" consisting of 2 tracks pieces, plus 2 studs of space to separate the moving from non-moving items and allow the hinge to do it's job. The track leading up to the "failure point" as I call it, is raised ever so gently at an angle of (at most) 1 1/3 bricks high per 1 section of track. (The angle of ascent / descent depends on which part of track you are on, but for the most part it's consistent.) The design of the bridge is modular so that you can easily disassemble the bridge for transport. It disassembles into 2 lower ramp sections consisting of 4 tracks each and 2 flat sections placed onto plates with the 1 "failure point" module consisting of a hinged (on one end) track piece in the middle. The bridge when the track is safe to cross: the pins are inserted and it should be stable. Naturally, a very heavy engine will snap the Technic rods in half, breaking the bridge permanently. Thus you can only use this engine with Small engines like my 2-6-0 + it's consist, (AKA the Lone Ranger train) the My Own Train series engines, or something of comparable weight. This is how it works: Their are two hidden Technic rods under the track that should allow trains to pass by safely overhead. Pull the Technic connector and your bridge collapses. Lift the bridge up and move the rod back in to reset the bridge for the next adventure. US 1870's TRAIN STUFF - LDD FILES LDD file for the green 4-2-4 loco only: http://www.moc-pages...1471631241m.lxf LDD file for the green loco and it's train: http://www.moc-pages...1471631317m.lxf LDD file for the red 4-6-0 loco only: http://www.moc-pages...1473035459m.lxf LDD file for the yellow 4-4-0 loco only: http://www.moc-pages...1473035594m.lxf LDD file for the yellow loco and it's train: http://www.moc-pages...1473101156m.lxf LDD file for the modular train station: http://www.moc-pages.com/user_images/80135/1456867526m.lxf LDD file for the collapsing train bridge: http://www.moc-pages.com/user_images/80135/1472495977m.lxf EDIT 9/18/16 - Added real life pictures of the train station and digital pictures of the bridge. The LDD files were added for both as well. Comments, Questions, and complaints are always welcome! Thanks for looking!
  18. Hi guys, having just recently resurfaced from my dark ages, I got set 60098 some time ago and built up a small layout (which, at the moment, merely occupies my desk and isn't even a full loop). In desperate need of a small shunting locomotive I additionally got set 3677 with the idea of shortening the locomotive. My first idea was to build a 3-axle loco, but I soon found out that the proportions would look strange if I didnt want to shorten it even further. So, in the end I decided on a 4-axle construction on 2 bogeys (just like the original 3677 loco). Some pieces are missing, so this is still a work in progress. The preliminary result looks like this: Hope you like it, quarren
  19. This is a model of a passenger unit of the Seaboard Air Line from the 1950s. This is basically the scheme that replaced the Orange Blossom scheme from the 1930s. The white colour should actually be a really light mint, but in almost any color photo from the era, it appears white. I kept the basic Super Chief shape for the nose because I think it is good enough for 6 wide trains. I'm probably not going to do much more with this one as it is a little late for for the era I am aiming for (30s - 40s), but it's still an interesting paint scheme.
  20. The loco is a 1926 oil burning Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-8-2 "Mountain" type, (4 leading, 8 drivers, 2 trailing) that was made surplus in 1951, donated in 1959, and restored to working order in 1988 for it's excursion career. It's new lease on life lasted until 2002 when insurance costs made the engine enter it's second retirement, while will be probably be forever. This may not be the best interpretation of the Frisco 1522, but it seems to be the only one I've ever seen built out of Lego. The model you see here has been my dream ever since I was 5 or six years old and rode behind the steamer on one of it's last public trips. (I don't remember much of the trip, but I remember the sense of awe and respect for the power of steam after seeing the loco pull past us on it's journey back to the museum and into what looks to be permanent retirement.) The cab walls on both model and real engine have the name of the railroad (Frisco) on it's side, while the number of the loco (1522) goes on the tender sides. The way to do this is using printed 1 x 1 tiles. The cab is kinda sparse on details, but their is a firebox door! The real engine is publicly displayed at the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri. Here is the LDD file for the engine and tender: http://www.moc-pages.com/user_images/80135/1469369814m.lxf Please, if you have any complaints, praise, questions, or anything like that, please post it below. Feedback is always welcome, and i would like some advice on things I could improve on. Thanks in advance!
  21. Right now I'm designing a updated Santa Fe train consist, hopefully to scratch the urges of the original without the hefty costs, but I want to ask a few questions before I start working on it. What parts from the original are the most expensive and difficult to buy? What are some better methods to tackle the nose without the expensive parts? I'll be posting updates and images, with LDD files as I work on this and at the end will upload to my Rebrickable, where I already host an old project.
  22. EDIT: Yes, I somehow jacked up the title it should read "[WIP] C&O Heavy Pacific" In the early Twentieth Century, the Chesapeake & Ohio used a fleet of Pacific 4-6-2s to haul some of its passenger trains. http://mrr.trains.co...RRNP0214_39.jpg http://s3.amazonaws....-11128_4081.jpg I have been working on and off on this one for several years now. This is not continuously, mind you. I would say I am about 75% done with this. The tender is a placeholder as I would like to build a better normal one or the more accurate Vanderbilt tender that the prototype comes with. However, I am trying to think how to properly do the tank portion as I currently use the tender to power it with 9V motors and have the tender filled with weights for better traction. Things I'm trying to sort out The under the smokebox shape. It's complicated because of the way the cylinders attach. I want to replace the brick built cylinders with technic liftarm based ones as the currents ones have a habit of randomly exploding whilst running... Sorting out the greebling, namely above the drivers. Giving the cab an interior. It seems to run well around stock curves although the cylinders have to be realigned after awhile of running.
  23. I'm trying to design a realistically functioning model of a diesel locomotive. I don't care about looks at this point, given how limited my collection is, but what I'm wanting to aim for is a locomotive that appears to operate realistically. The chassis is going to be 6 studs wide for now as a prototype, and 46 studs long. In order of the drivetrain, it's going to be M-motor -> one way clutch -> flywheel -> forward/reverse gearbox -> trucks. This should allow the locomotive to realistically creep forward, move, and slow down gradually as if it were an actual diesel locomotive with a fluid drive transmission, or like HarmanMotor's fluid drive bus. The only problem I'm encountering so far is a compact, low friction one way clutch design. I've tried the one design made with the 3 rubber 2 stud lifters, but that doesn't work. It's too large and I can't get it to function properly without a large flywheel which wouldn't fit in the body, or base of the locomotive. I'm trying to design something compact enough you could put it inside the base or body of any diesel or electric loco, and dramatically improve the functionality. Any help?
  24. This is my latest project: a 4-6-4 Hudson Dreyfuss inspired stream-liner and it's corresponding train. It was heavily inspired by pictures from Anthony Sava's photo-stream from 2008 and 2007. No instructions were used to build this model. The railway name on the sides of the tender will read Legoredo Northwestern Railroad. The sides of the engine shall have the number 7444 written on it in official printed 1 x 1 tiles. The engine number comes from the screenshot number that was the first WIP shot that I took and coincidentally is near Mr. Sava's 7244 number on his Hudson - type. Here is a link to his model and the only picture I worked from: https://www.flickr.c...s-55973205@N08/ The rear of the engine has a ladder, two hand rails and a red marker light. Here is a close up of the nose of the engine. Fictional engine background: These fifteen 4-6-4 (4 leading, 6 driving, 4 trailing) streamlined steam locomotives were designed for fast passenger work on the Legoredo Northwestern Railroad. The three best riding locomotives of the batch were shrouded in a streamlined, aerodynamic casing, and were assigned to “the Rocket”. This meant they were usually flying along at top speed from New York City to Seattle, with one train going one way and another going the opposite direction. The third engine was held in reserve in case of breakdowns, ready to go at a moments notice. Fictional train background: Here we see the Dreyfuss Hudson pulling a passenger train called "The Rocket", heading from New York City to Seattle via the most northern transcontinental line in the USA. The train is run by the Legoredo Northwestern Railroad and gets it's name from the very fast speed of the train, and for the originator of all modern steam engines, George Stephenson's "Rocket" of 1830. This new train started being run exactly one hundred years after that famous engine began the era of the Iron Horse. The train consists of one baggage car, three passenger coaches, and one observation car. (these coaches are not in the LDD file) NOTES & LDD FILE: Here is the original NYC loco I was inspired by. (picture from Wikipedia) I have found over 500+ parts for this train, so this Art Deco loco and ti's consist will be (hopefully) finished by the end of this year. I also have the LDD file for the engine by itself here ( Hudson locomotive only ) comments, Questions and Complaints are always welcome!
  25. My LEGO version of the Baldwin DR-12-8-1500/2 "Centipede". The Centipede was Baldwin Locomotive Work's first attempt at a road diesel locomotive. Its unique feature was 12 axles which made the locomotive looked like a centipede. Unfortunately, it was not reliable and none was saved from the scrap yard. My MOC is powered by LEGO Power Functions. It follows LEGO 6 wide train toy style. It is approx. 60 studs long. Baldwin DR-12-8-1500/2 Centipede by dr_spock_888, on Flickr View from back. The Centipede was original built for passenger service but engine failures left it relegated to freight service. Access to Power Functions AAA battery box. The batteries also adds weight on top of the PF Train motor. Access to engineer in cab for playability (and changing Infrared Receiver channel): It can negiotiate LEGO R40 curves and switches. Although it looks like it is going to take out anything next to the curves. I had to add a lot of articulation to the wheel arrangement. It would look best on the largest ME curved track. I think it is a suitable MOC for all those metal axles I have been making for bogies. There is something interesting about having lots of wheels on equipment.