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Found 10 results

  1. (NOTE: This model will be built when funding allows, hopefully by the middle end of this year!) Inspired by set 149 (Fuel Refinery) from 1976 as seen above (pic from BrickSet), this model takes the 4.5v era Shell refinery and turns it into a two-bay diesel locomotive / oil burning steam engine fuel depot for the modern PF age. The model features two floors with removable roof sections, and is updated for 2017 parts-wise. The included truck is inspired by set 10184 (Town Plan), and features two four opening storage compartments and two side doors for the driver. NOTE: This part goes above both ends of the locomotive refueling bay. while this part here replaces the 2 x 4 x 3 brick on the wall. The flag should be printed too. As a side note, the locomotive bays are tall enough to let any official car through, including the double stacked container car from the Maersk train. The upper floor of the depot features a control station for monitoring the flow of fuel from the tanks on the roof to the service bay, or from the tanker truck to the storage tanks. The roof of the facility comes off in two sections. The upper floor features a opening door to the tanks and staircase to the lower floor and the flow-monitoring systems. I think my brother may originally have built this truck, but I'm not 100% sure where it came from as it's been on my computer for about three years. The driver's doors open, and so do all four storage compartments. This truck fits one driver figure. The LDD file for the truck and fuel depot is here. As usual, Comments, Questions, Suggestions & Complaints are always welcome!
  2. This model was inspired by set 10199 / 10249, Winter Village toy Shop. I originally built this as an open-back building in 2013, and scrapped it in 2015 for a larger, full-bodied station. I never did forget about this model, and recently rediscovered it while looking for my Hogsmeade station to go with my Hogwarts Express model I had designed. The track side features a space for eight printed 1 x 1 letter tiles to be placed to designate the station name along with plenty of passenger seating along the five-track-long platform. Here is the street side of the station. This side includes an overhang that protects passengers from the rain along with a wheelchair / luggage ramp access to the platform. The model features two modular lift-off levels and two split-away platform sections, along with some inside details. The lower floor features a fireplace, four chairs, and a desk for workers to hand out tickets. The top level features the station master's office. (I'm thinking about adding a staircase from this level to the platform... just have to get around to adding it into the structure.) Here is the complete LDD file. I already have 95% of this model collected IRL, and I just need to order the last 430 parts later this year. Comments, Questions, and Complaints are always welcome!
  3. The model seen here is originally based upon the Brick City Depot "Winter Village Train Station". I have modified it enough from the original model to upload the LDD file for my version, which is available below. The following is a fictional backstory on Barretts station. (Their is a real Barretts station, but it looks nothing like this an is not as old as my model is supposed to be. That station's history is nothing like this one!) This station was built in 1912 in Barretts, Missouri for use by Brick Railway Systems. It stands on the old Pacific Railway of Missouri right-of-way, which first ran through the area in the mid-1850's. The station is a wooden structure with a stone fireplace, indoor waiting area, and a freight storage room that was added to the station in 1928. The upper floor is for the telegraph operator, which as of 1997 the telegraph has been replaced with a computer for the dispatcher to locate any train in his sector at any time using Global Positioning Satellites. (also known as GPS) Here is the street side. EDIT 2/24/17: added new ADA -compliant parts to the section of the model... see below for details: The upper floor has the computer for the dispatcher. In true Lego City style, their are no stairs to the top floor. This is the lower floor, with a waiting room, and ticket seller. The freight storage room off to the right was added later, and connects the station via a hole cut into the wall. Two sliding doors allow for cargo to be loaded onto the platform side, or out the street side for loading onto a truck. Here is the modular side of things: One left and one right platform, the station proper, the control room and it's roof are all connected by either pins or a very few studs. The original model I based this off off is seen here, while my version's LDD file can be found at this link. This model should be built to replace my 7997-style train station later this year. As usual, comments questions, and complaints are always welcome! EDITED 2/20/17: Updated the screenshots into real-life pictures.
  4. Hello mates,today I show you my latest MOC: a little diorama of a warehouse. Recently I've visited a warehouse and I was stricken by the layout. The new MOC is complete with pallets, boxes, shelves, hand pallet truck and a fork-lift.Below a couple of pics Thanks for stopping by! Andrea | Norton74
  5. I was inspired by a Facebook post to the Modular LEGO Buildings group by a person named Kade Rodgers to create this railway station. Here is the original version that comes from 2011 and was later demolished: This model was inspired by set 10199, Winter Village toy Shop. The building is open backed, and features a desk on the top floor and ticket counter with cash register on the first floor. ...and here is the newer version the above model was turned into. This newer model is modular, and as such has five removable sections that combine into one medium size station. Here you can see the track side of the station which has plenty of seats (16 chairs, to be precise) for waiting passengers to sit on. Here you can see the street side, where the public enters the station from the parking lot or can directly access the platform via the ramp. You can also see the stairs to the upper floor which is where the station master's office is. This is the inside of the station, with two ticket machines and six seats for the indoor passenger waiting area. The coal burning fireplace is still used on really cold winter nights, but since the last few winters have been mild in Ironwood, it hasn't been used in a good long while. Here is the old station master's office on the upper floor, which is off limits the the public. In more recent years it has been made to function as the employee break room / switch control tower for the tracks in the immediate vicinity of the station. The entire model is made up of five sections that come apart. They are as follows: first floor, second floor, second floor roof, left platform and right platform. Sadly, their is no LDD file available for thew new station. However, comments, questions & complaints are always welcome! (EDIT 7/13/16: After hearing some good suggestions about adding a ramp back onto one of my railroad stations, I have finally finished finding the parts for it and gotten some pictures taken of the updated model. Enjoy!)
  6. This station was built in 1912 in Glencoe, Missouri for use by Brick Railway Systems. It stands just a stones throw from the Meramec River on the old Pacific Railway of Missouri right-of-way, which first ran through the area in the mid-1850's. The station is a stone structure with a fireplace plus indoor and outdoor waiting areas. The upper floor is for the telegraph operator. As of 1997, the telegraph has been replaced with a computer for the dispatcher to locate any train in his sector at any time using Global Positioning Satellites. (also known as GPS) Here is the track side of the station, featuring a five track long platform. Here is the street side. Their will be printed 1 x 1 tiles spell out the town name of GLENCOE on both of the signs when built in real life. Here is the modular side of things: One left and one right platform, the station proper, the control room and it's roof are all connected by either pins or a very few studs. In reality, the town of Glencoe really exists, but this station does not. There really was a Pacific Railway of Missouri, which bored the first two railway tunnels west of the Mississippi River in the mid 1850's at Barrets, Missouri. Barrets is where the Museum of Transport is located and Glenoce has the Wabash Frisco & Pacific Railway (a 12 inch gauge steam railway) which runs for two mile round trip on the old right of way. The original model seen here is based upon the Brick City Depot "Winter Village Train Station" instructions. I think I have modified it enough to upload the LDD file, which is available here: http://www.mocpages....1421346826m.lxf I have calculated the cost of this model at around a $110 USD (give or take), and am currently raising funds to create it in real life. Comments, questions and complaints are always welcome!
  7. Traditional Bus Station I've been on a rampage building Chicken Bus after Chicken Bus and I've finally got around to building a Bus Depot/Station for them. The building has been through several iterations and styles but I've finally got to a point where it had enough of a run down feel to it so that it would fit in with my economically depressed Lego City. Here's the main facade and of course it has broken windows, cracked stucco and exposed brickwork. There's a display on the roof - with another small scale Chicken Bus - just in case no-one realizes that it's a Bus Depot and I used some SNOT to build the circles in the facade. The view from the rear of the building. As I built the glass-curved roof structure it turned into something that looked like it came from a British Rail circa early-1990s design manual. And although it invoked painful memories of too many years commuting into London I decided to keep it. Loading time! And there's an interior with a waiting room, departure board and luggage lockers And a Bathroom area behind the wall with the arrow pointing the way. And a final image with yet another Chicken Bus I hope you enjoyed it! Comments, criticisms, and ridicule most welcome - now excuse me I have a bus to catch!
  8. My Lego Town is continuing its downward economic spiral. But there are signs of life. Here's my latest MOC for the downtown area. It's a Tractor Supply Depot that's rented out the second floor to a Dance Studio. It's built on one and a half base plates. There's an archway leading through to the Depot area at the rear of the building and an external staircase that leads to the second floor. On the roof there's the water tower that the owners have hidden behind a rickety Billboard. Here's the inside of the Depot showing the landing bay, a whole bunch of packing crates, spares and a chain-saw. The second floor has Miss Fiona's Dance Studio. It has a diagonal wooden dance floor, a beat up Piano (played by a crusty Trawler man!) On this floor there's also a tiled waiting area and a fully fitted Bathroom (behind the Green Door) Business is okay and Miss Fiona is content with life. But she doesn't realize what happens when she closes up shop for the night. The crusty Trawler man takes over the Studio and turns it into a nightclub! The piano is moved to one side, a light show bought in and the DJ spins top tunes until dawn. Things are going well, but then suddenly the foam machine breaks down and bubbles erupt everywhere! I think Miss Fiona will have something to say tomorrow! Comments and criticisms welcome!
  9. My home LUG - CoWLUG, the Colorado-Wyoming Lego User's Group - was asked to put up a display at the Laramie Train Depot Open House two weeks ago. Our setup took two and a half hours, and we ran the show more or less all day over the course of the weekend. Stuart of lifelites.com was this show's organizer. He hacked together some PF IR receivers and a couple of barrel connectors as an experiment. What we ended up with was an awesome fully remote-controlled layout for both 9v and PF trains. This allowed us to not have to take shifts in the center "pit" where all the regulator gubbins were at. In addition, we also had interactive arcade buttons set up that allowed the visitors to control various functions in the layout. This was also the button's first outing and we plan to have more functions at the next display. This year, one button controlled the track power for the elevated Chicago-style trains, another controlled the pumpjack on top of the Steampunk district, and the third controlled the steam plant for "Peter Piper's Pickled Peppers Plant". The buttons also helped keep the kids from glomming onto the trains as they went by. Of course, now you'll want images I suppose. *sigh* ok Cows are indeed a running theme, considering how the name is "CoWLUG". Hide yo' kids and hide yo' cows. Grumpy Thor is grumpy. Lego displays = srs bsns (CoWLUG displays =/= srs bsns, however). This is where the real fun happens. I feel my camera car is especially graceful. Just look at that low profile! Did I mention Stuart also had a CNC and engraved bricks for a while? It broke though and he hasn't gotten it working again yet. So there is a use for those Dino Attack pieces, at least. I still think the squid in the lower middle is the best bit of this picture. Among other things not pictured, there was a Doofenshmirtz Evil Inc. skyscraper (from the show Phineas and Ferb of the Disney Channel) and a prison complete with prison riot. There were guards dual-wielding bananas in one hand and tommy guns in the other. Ostriches were involved. Well, that should about wrap it up. Feel free to ask questions! Edit: D'oh, I forgot - I'll be posting my custom trains that I built for this event in their own thread. Look forward to that, I know I will Edit2: Oh snap, I forgot another thing. My mom took the pictures, which is why they're so good. Thanks Mom!
  10. Winterville Station For years, Lego trains have circled the base of my Christmas Tree. More recently, official Winter Village sets have sprung up to join them, but the train never had anywhere to stop. So, this year, the mini-folk of Winterville finally have a train station to call their own. The station is a little bigger than the existing kits in the line, but then it's a train station, I'd expect it to be a little bigger than a toy store or a bakery. It looks pretty good next to the official kits and has the same sort of "feel," that's really what I was after. I don't usually do much at Mini-figure scale and Christmas Kitsch is definitely outside my normal comfort zone, but hey, it's the holidays, why not mix things up a bit. Here we have all hands on deck, clearing the recent snow from the platform to make way for the presents waiting to be loaded into the mail car. The far end of the platform features more lights, seating areas and a station clock. In keeping with the Winter Village style, we have a separate little mini-build to pad out the area. I figured all that snow they cleared from the platform had to go somewhere, why not build a snowman? In keeping with the Winter Village HGD (Hospital Gown Design - i.e. open in back) style, it's interior is readily accessible. I was shooting for something spacious without being boring, functional yet homey. The inside features a ticketing desk an open waiting area with clock and fireplace. And yes, Computer Geek Guy has just finished reading a copy of the Daily Prophet. Of course, what would a Winter Village set be without a light brick? In this build, I decided to hide the brick in the hearth to light the fiery bits in the fireplace from below. I'm not a great photographer, but trust me, it looks neat in person. The dark gray plate visible in the base of the open sidewall is the switch for the light. It sits flush when the fireplace is on and protrudes half a stud or so when it's off. I hope you've enjoyed your tour of the the new Winterville Station. Happy Holidays. EDIT: In re-reading the contest thread, I realized I'd posted too many photos. This has now been corrected. For the curious, the additional shots can be found here. EDIT: Or here (when MOCPages is acting up)