Tea Weevil

Eurobricks Knights
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  1. You could always pretend that they're a chain! I've seen two Starbucks stores within a city block or two of each other. That's it! I knew it looked familiar. I used to have family in Kansas City (in fact, that's where I was born)--that's the square with the Neptune fountain, right? It definitely bears some resemblance. As you mention, the Lego buildings are less Mediterranean, but the feel is similar. That's cool!
  2. Oops--I'm sorry, I didn't mean to misrepresent you. I guess that's what I get for going off of memory (from what must have been quite some time ago--a year, perhaps, or more?). Sorry about that! I agree that it would be nice to return to slightly higher buildings. I've appreciated the smaller ones--they create a nice varied skyline, and my two-story creations don't look quite so out of place when there's a wider variation of building sizes. But since the DO, the BB, and the PS are the only ones I have, I'm hoping that the variety can be improved in an upwards way. Similarly, the size/width variation that the multi-business model can give is something I enjoy, particularly when it makes my display feel more "real." Take the laundromat, for example. I will admit that it does diminish the grandeur of the bank. But I like how it makes it appear as though the bank has expanded, buying the room above the laundry and connecting it to the rest of the bank for use as the president's office. It's certainly a trade-off, though, and there are no two ways about that. Anyway, sorry again for misrepresenting you. I look forward to the reveal of the new modular--and to hearing your thoughts on it!
  3. Technically true; the Pet Shop was just one business with one residential building, but it was still not only one building with only one business. Two businesses, two buildings. I wouldn't mind such an even split again. I don't think that it's necessary to speculate about a multi-business combo. It's happened twice in a row, but that's not necessarily indicative of a permanent change--just a trend. After many buildings with similar footprints, it makes sense that the designers would want to work in a little variety to avoid feeling stale. There's a good chance that it'll be a multi-business combo, but I'd say it's not a guarantee by any means. It is likely, however, to have some of the other things you dislike about the direction the modular line has been going, such as a smaller height (compared to GG, TH, etc.), a story, and a more detailed interior. I like those--I feel like detailed interiors improve the look even when viewing from outside; it adds to the feel of something being "real" when we can catch glimpses of furniture, rugs, etc., through windows, but it's understandable why some don't.
  4. Very nice! The exterior looks great; I love the touch of color that the roof adds. The inside is lovely as well. There's a longstanding local outdoor shop in my town, and the interior of the MOC reminds me of this store.
  5. Nice! As a Beatles fan, I'm excited for this--they look just like the cartoon.
  6. Very nice--it captures the same feel of some of the ski stores I've seen in Breckenridge. I particularly like the way you did the door/entryway.
  7. It could also be Charles Dickens....
  8. I'd love to see a return of Adventurers; I think that Johnny Thunder, as a globe-trotting adventurer, is versatile enough to drive all kinds of early-20th-century themes. And unlike, say, Jake Raines, JT has been around for enough subthemes to be iconic. However, I recently heard somewhere that Orient Expedition sold poorly (despite being, in my opinion, the best Adventurers subtheme). If that's the case, I can see why they'd be hesitant to bring him back full-time. Plus, it has been 12 years since the last regular Adventurers sets, so I'm guessing the nods in places like the Lego Movie are as much as we'll get. Which is a shame, as similarly updated character designs would be great.
  9. I still doubt the veracity of this rumor. I think it was this time last year when everyone was certain we were getting an arcade.
  10. I think this actually makes such a building less likely. It's fans who would want an inverted corner (some fans--I wouldn't). But a potential buyer who sees only minimal façade with two big walls lacking detail might not feel the same. I'm a parent as well as a fan; I don't think kids are as drawn to a tiny façade and minimal sidewalk as they are to a building that has plenty of front-facing design features. I feel the same way. As a standalone set, to avoid displaying it with blank walls showing, you'd have to display the back end frontwards.
  11. You already covered most of this, but here's part of a post I made in the other topic. In addition to being a Bionicle fan (from 2001 to mid-2004, then again starting in 2009), I'm also a parent. My kids aren't quite old enough to play with non-Duplo Lego yet, but I've already thought over how I as a parent would react. So, here's the post. 1. Price/Size. Though my kids are too young for Bionicle, this would also apply to how I as a parent would operate if my kids asked for something. The original Toa were $7--and they had mostly new molds, plastic canisters, and mini-CDs. By the time the Glatorians came around (the year I got back into the theme after entering my Lego dark ages in late 2004), that had increased to $13. The $7 of the original Toa and the $8 of the Nuva and Metru put these squarely into the realm of an impulse but. For me, the cutoff is around $10. For example, I bought 6217 Surge on a whim at $9 (followed by Splitface, who was pricier, but he went well with Surge, whom I had already bought). This is something I appreciated about Hero Factory: they downsized the hero figures and bright the price down too--I prefer slightly smaller figures anyway. Given inflation, $15 was a decent price for the new smaller Toa. But it still put them out of the impulse buy category, at least for me. I had to really think about whether I wanted a Toa or whether I could use the $15 on tea or other Lego. And with the exception of 2015 Gali and 2016 Onua, the other stuff won out. I did buy a Protector on an impulse, though. Still, having the main heroes so inaccessible really didn't seem to work so well. 2. The lack of CDs--or an equivalent. For at least the first few years, the canister sets came with those mini CDs. I know those wouldn't be practical now, but something similar would have been nice--maybe a website code. I know I spent lots of time exploring the lore, layout, and feel of Mata Nui from those mini CDs. That kind of immersive experience that helps with worldbuilding and is tied to a purchase really helped those early years, I think.
  12. Duplex--I know I'm going to use my 2016 Onua as Onua Nuva who has settled into crystal caves deep in Spherus Magna; the crystal motif and Nuva symbol work great for adaptive armor. So, G2 can have some G1 use, too.
  13. They probably won't be too high, as Bionicle isn't in too high demand. You can even find Toa Mata for a reasonable price.
  14. Wow. I remember being on vacation in Oregon almost exactly two years ago. Because I was new at my job and hadn't racked up vacation days, I had to work remotely for part of the time. One day I booted up my computer and checked Eurobricks only to find news that Bionicle was returning, alongside the grainy black-and-white photo. Not long after, the grainy color photo came along. I was ridiculously excited. I was 12 when Bionicle came out--on the older end of the target audience--but I loved it. I was going through a tough time, and I'd never encountered anything like it. I remember there was a line about blending the mystical and the mechanical, and that thrilled me. Now I'm not just a (casual) fan, but also a parent. As such, I didn't get as many G2 sets (not even close!), but I did get a few, and followed the story as much as I could. I've seen a lot of ideas people have had over why it failed--some have more merit than others (the idea that no effort went into it is silly). Here are a few that I haven't seen mentioned. 1. Price/Size. Though my kids are too young for Bionicle, this would also apply to how I as a parent would operate if my kids asked for something. The original Toa were $7--and they had mostly new molds, plastic canisters, and mini-CDs. By the time the Glatorians came around (the year I got back into the theme after entering my Lego dark ages in late 2004), that had increased to $13. The $7 of the original Toa and the $8 of the Nuva and Metru put these squarely into the realm of an impulse but. For me, the cutoff is around $10. For example, I bought 6217 Surge on a whim at $9 (followed by Splitface, who was pricier, but he went well with Surge, whom I had already bought). This is something I appreciated about Hero Factory: they downsized the hero figures and bright the price down too--I prefer slightly smaller figures anyway. Given inflation, $15 was a decent price for the new smaller Toa. But it still put them out of the impulse buy category, at least for me. I had to really think about whether I wanted a Toa or whether I could use the $15 on tea or other Lego. And with the exception of 2015 Gali and 2016 Onua, the other stuff won out. I did buy a Protector on an impulse, though. Still, having the main heroes so inaccessible really didn't seem to work so well. 2. The lack of CDs--or an equivalent. For at least the first few years, the canister sets came with those mini CDs. I know those wouldn't be practical now, but something similar would have been nice--maybe a website code. I know I spent lots of time exploring the lore, layout, and feel of Mata Nui from those mini CDs. That kind of immersive experience that helps with worldbuilding and is tied to a purchase really helped those early years, I think.
  15. The Munsters was also in black and white.