NathanR

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  1. Very nice! I've always loved Zoetropes and Lego ones are just the icing on the cake There seems to be one subtle detail wrong though - each slit is supposed to have a drawing/mini-figure directly behind it, but yours doesn't look like it does. The trick is to build the cylinder from a polygon using an odd number of sides (very tricky to do, given that Lego generally builds even-numbered polygons). That might actually help make the animation look a bit better, especially on camera. I also wondered if you should reduce the number of frames and make the wall panels a bit wider, that might help blur out the side frames and keep the viewer's eyes focused on the central figure. I remember a great Zoetrope on Lego Ideas, I'll have to try building one of these some day... though as most of my Lego bricks are 800 miles away at the moment, it'll just have to stay on the to-do list for now...
  2. Wow, some lovely details there! I especially love the use of the white half-0barrels on SRB engines. Interior details are amazing too!
  3. Wow, it's fantastic to see this in real life! It's amazing to think how far NASA was able to go in just 8 short years. I've updated the design on mecabricks, it now has a display stand for a separate Mercury capsule, and a slightly different engine structure for the Redstone booster. It will still rotate, since I've had to use a 6L bar to mount it, but it should be ok. I will post pictures/details when my bricks finally arrive
  4. I'm not sure I'd try and buy the Emerald Night without changing the colour scheme. I did buy individual parts for the Emerald Night locomotive about a year ago, I think it cost me something like £110 or £120 + shipping (one order from the USA, I really got stung on import fees to the UK ). I found the black train wheels a little tricky to get hold of, I got the 2x4 curved slopes in plain green as the printed prison was something like £5 each, the pearl dark grey hoses were almost impossible to get hold of too. I was able to buy a replacement sticker sheet from https://ministickers.nl/, they also did one that had the numbers and names for Flying Scotsman. The coach I didn't even try and get - the tan window frames are insanely expensive. I think if I were buying it now, I'd change the colour scheme and try and update the design to take advantage of the Lego bricks that have been introduced since the set was released.
  5. Hi Michele, welcome to eurobricks! That's a nice find, I always regretted missing out on 7470. I think the 10213 Shuttle Adventure (which I did get ) is similarly sized despite its inclusion of minifigures, and it offered a complete shuttle launch stack. I'm not sure Lego would ever make anything else to the same specific scale though. The shuttle and the Saturn V make impressively large display pieces at 1:110 size, but what else could they build? The International Space Station would be ~1m long at 1:110, but would be way too fragile to hold together (I think they actually designed one and sent it up to the real ISS, where it was built for the first and only time in orbit, since it would collapse under its own weight here on Earth). Other NASA rockets are relatively obscure or would be tiny at this scale - my own MOC of the Mercury rockets is a simple stack of 2x2 round bricks. Also, I'm not sure there would be the interest - taking my Mercury MOCs as an example, they've dropped right off the board's front page with barely a comment. I think that the Space Shuttle and Apollo moon rocket are the only real space vehicles to have ever truly captured the public's imagination.
  6. Why did you show me that? Now I have to reverse engineer it and order a few bucket loads of bricks...
  7. Wow, I would never have thought it was even possible to build Herbie at this scale! Amazing build, I may have to order some bricks...
  8. Beautiful! My dad and I both have a soft spot for Camberwick Green, especially the episode where Windy Miller drinks a lot of cider and "it makes him very sleepy" Good luck with your exams, I can't wait to see the other locations you design once they're out the way. Any plans to build this in real bricks?
  9. Wow, I have got to try this. Do you need a special nightly build of blender or does it work with the default install?
  10. The Saturn V launched with the Command Module covered by a white "Booster Protection Cover" (BPC) that was topped with the launch escape tower. When the Saturn V got out the main part of the atmosphere the tower jet was no longer useful if the mission had to be aborted and so it was jettisoned, exposing the silver-grey Command Module. For Lego, there is no existing part that can cover the 4x4 cone piece (and as an Ideas set, they are not allowed to create any new parts). So yes, you do have to physically swap the 4x4 cones out, but only once your rocket is in orbit The Command/Service Module is complete and always has the engine bell attached - a very clever solution using a Technic axle 4 with centre stop adds a gap between the engine and Service Module, so that the cone halves can close around it. There is also space inside the cone for the Eagle lunar lander, though I keep mine on the lunar surface display base. Trust me, you will love this set.
  11. On May 7, 1961, astronaut Alan Shepard became then first American in space. Flying the Mercury capsule "Freedom 7", he reached an altitude of 187.5km on his 15 minute sub-orbital flight. This particular model is in scale with the recent Lego Ideas 21309 Saturn V/Apollo rocket. I’ve taken the scale from the Apollo command module, assuming 1 stud = 1m. Sadly, at this small size (just 2 studs across), it isn't possible to recreate the United States logo down the side of the rocket, or the distinctive black-and-white stripes in the aft section. If anyone has advice on getting custom prints done, I'd certainly be interested. I was nearly going to use the traditional Lego rocket fin for the tail of the ship, but I decided to try and recreate the black and white patterning on the engine block using some robot arms: I'm a little concerned about my use of a 3.18mm bar in the technic axle holes to hold the base of the rocket together, as it's an unusual technique that (I think) may be damaging to the 2x2 round bricks and plates. That said, it has been used in a few Lego sets so I'm confident it is at least "legal". The model features a display stand, based on the actual launchpad of the Mercury-Redstone: The Mercury-Redstone comes with a separate Mercury capsule on its own display stand - this version includes a 1x1 round plate on the base to represent the retro-rocket pack. This was a small engine that fired to bring Freedom 7 down to Earth on a good trajectory, but unfortunately there isn't the space to include it on the rocket stack. The Mercury capsule was topped by a 4.8m red escape tower, which would propel the capsule up and away from an exploding booster. While never used on manned flights (fortunately), it saw incredibly frequent use during the early testing of rockets! A nanofigure astronaut is included for scale… and yes, Mercury really was that tiny!! This is a digital MOC and hasn't been tested in real life. An older version has appeared on mecabricks, but this one has been updated to use parts that actually exist. Comments and criticism are always appreciated!
  12. On February 20th 1960, U.S astronaut John Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth. Piloiting the Mercury capsule “Friendship 7”, launched atop a newly up-rated Atlas rocket, he successfully made three orbits of the Earth. The mission suffered various glitches, including thruster issues and a possible loose heat shield (which could have been fatal), but was essentially a complete success and paved the way for future American space exploration. (Base image from Wikipedia) This particular model is in scale with the recent Lego Ideas 21309 Saturn V/Apollo rocket. I’ve taken the scale from the Apollo command module, assuming 1 stud = 1m. The Atlas rocket was a 1.5 stage rocket. Unlike the Saturn V, which dropped complete assemblies of fuel-tanks and engines, the Atlas rocket jettisoned it’s two outer engines on the way to orbit. This is possible on the model: The Mercury-Atlas comes with a separate Mercury capsule on its own display stand - this version includes a 1x1 round plate on the base to represent the retro-rocket pack. This was used to de-orbit and return Friendship 7 to Earth, but unfortunately there isn't the space to include it on the rocket stack. The Mercury capsule is topped by a 4.8m red escape tower, which would propel the capsule up and away from an exploding booster. While never used on manned flights (fortunately), it saw incredibly frequent use during the Atlas rocket's early testing! A nanofigure astronaut is included for scale… and yes, Mercury really was that tiny!! This is a digital MOC and hasn't been tested in real life. Comments and criticism is always appreciated - I would also welcome advice on how to build a suitable display stand. There’s no way the rocket can stand on its engines, and not many connection points left near the base!
  13. That's a mini lever base. It's part of a small antennae made up of a base and a lever - Lego only sells them as complete units now but it's really easy to pull them apart.
  14. Hi Baggio_vai, welcome to eurobricks! Ooh, those are old pieces, Lego haven't made those since the 90s I think... The pylon arm seems to be made from 1x 4531 and 2x 2880. They're definitely in LDD, though you might need to be working in extended mode to be able to find them. Is this a train your building?
  15. Oh, I could have a lot of fun with that! But can we please have a MacOS version so I can actually play this game?