LeeMcG

Eurobricks Vassals
  • Content count

    27
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About LeeMcG

  1. I was on the first tour, and have just posted a review to www.newelementary.com In terms of the 80, I now think there are 80 made per tour, and there were four tours this year. The rest of the sets go to Lego employees etc.
  2. Thanks very much everyone for all the comments... I think I'll answer some directly. @rriggs. Indeed I have turned CIty Hall round - good spot. This was because I wanted people to be able to see the slope from the side. There are a few other things changed for artistic licence - the Tate Modern is also rotated because the familiar view is from St. Paul's, and the location of the Imperial War Museum and BT tower have been adjusted somewhat to allow them to even be on this map. I will look again at the height of the White Tower. It may have creeped wider, without gaining the respective height. However I am pretty sure Tower Bridge is right (or as right as it can be), as I've done a super-imposed picture. Moreover, these are all odd scales, and I decided the scale by choosing one element - usually the size of a pillar, etc. (which has really got to be one brick wide or two). In the case of Tower Bridge, I scaled everything else from the towers being 1 stud wide - so you might argue that all other parts are too big but the tower width is correct by definition :-) A few requests for a tube. Believe me, it was considered. In the end though I left it out because I ran out of time and justified it as I thought it would be either a step too far in scale inconsistency, or too small to get any kind of detail. Given the vast difference in scale between CIty Hall, Imperial War Museum, a postbox and a bone maybe I'm just kidding myself. I left out the Cenotaph for scale reasons too, and Elephant and Castle because none of the bricks for my brick-built elephant seemed to be available in pink :-) Thanks again for the comments. If anyone is local and wants to see it, it'll be in the Stratford Lego store for the next 6 weeks or so. Lee
  3. Hi Everyone I haven't had a lot of time for building recently so I decided to try my hand at some microscale building - I thought it would be quicker, or at least allow me to finish individual models. I wanted to do real small microscale, fitting real landmarks on to 4x6 (ish) plates and seeing if I could still make them recognisable. I live in London, and there are some world-recognised buildings here, so it seemed the obvious place to start. Here is The London Eye: Nelson's column: the White Tower at the Tower of London: and Tower Bridge: There are more landmarks on my flickr set including Big Ben, Tower 42, the Imperial War Museum and City Hall. Despite just doing this so that I could have small models that I could complete, I was convinced that I should put them on display in my local LEGO store. This meant building a setting for them, as well as some typically London decorations (taxis, buses, phone and post boxes), so I ended up spending a lot of time anyway: Thanks for taking a look and, fingers crossed, I'll have some more time to build and post soon.
  4. I did drop the spire by a couple of plates for the final solution. But it involved a few more changes: the original corner slopes meant too much splaying so I got ride of then and put a 'rocket' piece inside instead: http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?P=4591 to facilitate the right amount of splaying!
  5. Thanks for the kind words. Yes that's twin boys. One told a random customer that their "daddy made that".
  6. Just a little update. I'm pleased to say that this MOC is now on display in the Stratford (UK) Lego store. Thanks for all the help and guidance here. This is only my 2nd real MOC so I really appreciate the help. My 5 year old boys now think I'm famous!
  7. Thanks. I think I agree. The only downside is that there is a bit of a shape to the spire, where the corners stick out a bit at the bottom and you lose that - it becomes a plain pyramid. But I think at this scale, I can't have that shape. I've taken both your suggestions on board. It involved losing the bottom slopes entirely, and then a different arrangement to keep the wedge plates 'splayed'. I don't have a white 2x2x2 cone, but I do have the pyramid version, which is good enough for now (I think the cone will be better because there's a little overhang with the pyramid) - I'll make the change after I've given it to my wife. If you're interested I'll post a new picture when the light is better tomorrow morning.
  8. Sorry to reply so much to my own topic! I've made a different spire as suggested by Vincent, and I thought I'd solicit opinions. These angles definitely show the existing spire at its worst! That's (obviously) the actual church, then the existing spire, and then the new one based on Vincent's idea. (If your screen is wide enough, they are all on one row for comparison.) Which do you think is best? Any other adjustment ideas? Thanks in advance. Edit: added links to flickr pages.
  9. @Hoexbroe - Of course there are always a mixture of scales in anything in Lego, the railings at the front and the plants at the side are much too large for any sensible scale (and the less said about the scale of the details the better). But it's actually quite a bit bigger than you've judged. The main church is more like 1:144. Here is one of the photos I took, which shows some people sitting on the top steps - you can see how large the bottom of those pillars are. So that maybe answers why there is no bride and groom. People would be be about 4-5 plates high. And thanks to Vincent. I actually have those plates (but only considered trying them as pairs) I'm going to give them a whirl using just one side. Reason for Edit: Photo didn't need to be as large as it was. Inserted smaller version.
  10. Thanks for all the comments. I am pretty sure my wife doesn't frequent EB! So should be okay with the surprise. She's more likely to wander into my study and that is pretty unlikely. I did try mocking up the spire a bit as Kristel suggested, but it just looked a bit too chunky. It's really thin and elegant in real life.
  11. B-OV-38B Hi. I've just finished a MOC which I've been working on for a few months. It's a smaller-than-minifig scale (not sure of the right way to describe the scale, it's much larger than normal microscale stuff) model of the church in London where I had my wedding reception last year. It was built in the late 1700's and designed by Hawksmoor, a contemporary of Christopher Wren. Here's photo of the church in real life (not mine, thanks to the photographer) And here is it on Streetview: A couple more views (There are more including WIP on my Flickr pages): Comments are appreciated. I have just over a week, and then I'm going to give it to my wife (she doesn't know what I've been working on), so I'd like to make it as good as possible. I'm particularly troubled with the spire, which goes from 4x4 studs and is 14 or so studs high. Plates don't seem to be made with enough of a sharp angle, so I've gone with the current design, which does have holes from certain views. Thanks for looking. Lee
  12. 1. mordatre - 2 4. Kristel - 2 5. gurusql - 1
  13. 4. cdaimers - 3 3. TAFOL - 1 5. ZCerberus - 1
  14. 1. George G. - 3 2. lisqr - 1 12. moctown - 1