McWaffel

Eurobricks Vassals
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    91
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About McWaffel

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Germany
  • Interests
    Lego Trains and Layouts

Extra

  • Country
    Germany
  1. The system needs to know which direction the trains are traveling in. Or lets say, the system needs to know which would be the trains next block, if it made the train go forward. If there are two trains facing each other on a single-track line, you have a race condition. So you need to make sure that something like that can't happen in the first place. If two trains are behind each other, the sensor that is between them mustn't be triggered at all. Since the sensors are always shared by two blocks, you could easily figure this out. If two blocks are occupied next to each other and the sensor that is shared by both of them is triggered, then you know there's been illegal train-movement. If any of those cases appear, the system is programmed to lock down all blocks and shut down all the trains instantly. This is displayed by a double-red on all signals.
  2. I looked there, but there was no delete button :/
  3. Does anyone know how to delete attachments? As in free up space for new attachments to upload?
  4. That's the plan. Probably the only reason I'm doing this
  5. Thanks! I'm actually not really using sensors with signals directly. It's a bit more complicated. I'll try to explain it in a simple way: The track (in this example a circle) is split into different sections called "blocks". Every block owns two signals (one for each end of the block). In my video you can see only one signal per block (I haven't built the signals for the other direction yet), so every block would have two signals. And also every block has two sensors. One at each end. Which also means that two conjoining blocks share the same sensor. The signals and the sensors never communicate with each other. Sensors influence the block's data and this in return influences the signals. This way I have to run way less wires and it saves money. The downside is, that the software is a lot more complicated this way.
  6. I'm getting no warnings for me-models.com
  7. I give you that, but it's not failsafe. I guess with modern LED technology that's not so bad, but I can imagine it causing much havoc in the old days. Overlaps sounds like a neat concept! I have not thought of that yet but it seems that I should give it a thought some time. My signals all stay red, until the train has fully cleared the block. Only then they change back to green. But generally yes, I'm building a fictional system which in my opinion works better for a fictional world with Lego figurines. Also it's probably the only opportunity you have, to be able to design such a signaling system for something and then actually see it work. The designing part of it is great fun I absolutely agree! I love to look at different types of signaling systems (Germany, UK, US, Japan, Sweden...) and think about them. Then I think about the parts that I don't like about them and parts that I like and get inspired.
  8. Thanks, the electronics are quite complicated. There's about 20-25m of wires on a 3m circle track. It's quite excessive. I've thought about yellow aspects but I haven't planned to add them yet. If I were to add any, I would probably hard-wire them to the main signals (red-red-green) so that when the red or red-red signal is shown, the according yellow lights come up automatically. I'll add them to the list of signals. I'm planning to use the color yellow on switches to show wether the track is diverging or not. I might change that though. //Edit: I thought of a better solution: Because the blocks on most Lego track are relatively short, adding a distant signal with yellow aspects doesn't necessarily help the driver. Instead what I think I'll do is I'll make the main signal green light flash, if the next main signal shows red. Since this is my own phantasy railway it works better for me anyway. I don't want to be too close to real life. I see it as a sort-of improvement on real life
  9. You should motorize it and make a video of the train arriving at a station then opening its doors :D that would be truly epic.
  10. Hey guys! After a few weeks of break I'm back and working on my test-setup for train signaling. As some of you know, I've built a small test track on my desk and wired up a lot of sensors and LEDs to program and develop a signaling system for trains. I'm finally at a point where I can drive trains over a layout that has block signaling fully working and completely automated too. Here's a video: When the train passes over the block sensor, a flag is set and it's only when the flag is removed (i.e. the train has fully passed over the signal and an additional time of 1 second has passed), that the signal switches to red and vice versa. The code only makes the block-section check it's sensors and flags get set and removed automatically meaning I have minimal code maintenance to do if I want to change anything. I have a lot more signals planned for the future including switch track signals, crossings and station signals. If you're interested, I can provide a PDF with all the signals I came up with. Let me know what you think. All feedback is appreciated.
  11. Man that is so cool! I would be totally interested in this. Will it still be able to run on battery power like a real hybrid? I would want to use those wheels to charge up the train in the "depot" and then have it drive around on PF track until it needs recharging. That would be a dream come true.
  12. Who cares what others think? When people come to my place and see my Lego railroad they obviously first look at it as a toy (because that's what it ultimately is) but after a minute or two they realize that it's more than just a toy, especially thanks to all the modifications and automation and customization I'm doing which you can clearly see. And they become really fascinated by it. Track switch motors, custom lighting, fine voltage control, signaling... all this is "real model railroading".
  13. The cab lights are super cool! I'm interested in the technical details of this. How did you fit the LEDs? What size LEDs are you using? What's your power supply?
  14. Great! I understand when people build 7, 8 or 9 wide trains, but as you pointed out yourself most of our stuff is 6 wide, by the very fact that that's Legos own scale. I therefore like it very much when people build great looking MOCs like this in 6 wide scale :) Well done! Does it go around corners with the 3-axle bogies?
  15. I hope it will be on sale to the end of the ear. Would be a bummer if I miss out on it.