Daedalus304

Eurobricks Citizen
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About Daedalus304

  • Birthday 03/28/90

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    Male
  • Location
    New Mexico

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    USA
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  1. These are great, I would say an improvement over the original in every way. Good work!
  2. I really love what I am seeing here with the switches! I don't know if it is a bit soon to ask, but do you have any idea when you might get your Kickstarter going for these switches? Also, any basic rough idea of generally what a size of pledge would be good for a pair of switches? I understand that there's likely no way to get anything resembling an exact number, but if I know a single pair of left and right r104 switches will cost say $50-$100 then I know what to try to put aside in the budget to make sure I can back these when the time comes.
  3. Sure thing! Sorry I didn't have more info to give! Hey thanks! 8-wide diesels don't seem to be as popular as 8-wide steamers I've noticed, but that's okay; to each their own! I've been meaning to put together some SVGs of the numbers and BNSF logos to get some good-quality stickers to get the lettering and numbering on it, but I keep getting distracted. I tend to be pretty bad at finishing off the sticker/decal stage of locos I build... Thanks!
  4. Thanks, everyone! I haven't tended to put a lot of detail or attention into cabs in the past, they've all been really really rough approximations. This one still isn't exactly close enough to be a proper scale model of it - but I did spend a lot more time trying to capture some of the more prominent bits. I had a lot of fun with it, especially the bits on the right-hand side. LNER A1s have always been some of my favorite locos, with all the curvature around the cab and firebox area they sort of hit this perfect sweetspot where they have the style of a streamlined engine while still looking distinctly like steam locomotives. I agree about the coaches, right now I've got three Emerald Night coaches for it to pull that look really nice behind it, but after I finish my next huge train project I might put together some proper 8-wide coaches for it to pull. I'm glad you like the outdoor photography. I have never had a good "proper" indoor photography set with the neutral backgrounds and the fancy lighting, so a sunny day and a park table is what I have to work with. Not all the shots turn out quite like I'd like, rogue shadows and whatnot, but to me it almost makes the engines feel just a bit more real!
  5. Thanks! I had a lot of fun taking pictures of this engine. I considered the livery with the dark green for all of .002 seconds before I realized that I was just not up for trying to figure out all this crazy SNOT and roof detailing with the limited parts palette of dark green, especially since my other main build colour was orange. If you can do it, I would absolutely love to see it! Ah well, I spent quite some time looking through CodeFox's thread and the information he provided and realized pretty quick that between the fact that I have incredibly shaky hands and the fact that I have no soldering experience whatsoever, there was little chance I'd be able to build one. So I cheated and bought one that Legoman666 put together for me. :D
  6. So this locomotive is out of my usual fare these days, and given that my fledgling layout is going to be modelling an area of southwest American desert this may seem like quite the anomaly. This engine is the result of a few things that are significant to me. though. The Emerald Night in 2009 was my first glimpse at what a LEGO train could be, before that my only knowledge of them was the previous rather undetailed 9v stuff and the My Own Train line was, to me, the best LEGO steam had to offer. I bought an Emerald Night as soon as I could and started trying to learn to build my own, at the same time I went online and found the massive AFOL train community and struck it big when I stumbled across MOCs by Tony Sava, who's work astounded me. From there it wasn't long until I found Cale, Bricktrix, and the rest of the greats and began focusing most if not all my building attention on local steamers, my old 8-wide emerald night conversion gathering dust. Then, I found out about Tornado, the brand new A1 Peppercorn. Growing up, I didn't have a lot of real, personal interaction with railroads - there were no running lines near enough to my house for me to ever see one. My introduction to the world of trains was the same as many young childen - Thomas the Tank Engine. As I grew up and started getting into trains more, getting some HO stuff, I became more focused on American locomotives - but those beautiful British steamers have always held a place in my heart. Tornado, the first brand new steam engine, was a huge milestone to me and I've always wanted to build a model of it. Since then, a few LEGO models of Tornado have been built. I loved Andrew Harvey's Tornado model as well as Michael Gale's, which is fantastic. And each time I saw them I knew I had to build a Tornado of my own. So these two things finally came and melded together two weeks ago when I saw my pair of old Emerald Night mods sitting on a shelf, still gathering dust. It was time. This model was built as a model of Tornado, but due to my love of the Emerald Night I've given this locomotive the name and number of good ol' 10194. Since this engine is going to be running on a layout with American rolling stock, I decided to leave the red buffer beam flat instead. I had been thinking on passing on it altogether, but I just flat out like the red there better. The A1 Peppercorn has a lot of really beautiful shapes and curves that I wanted to try and make sure I got, and I am pretty happy with how it turned out. As for the technical details, this engine is powered by a single L-motor hidden in the firebox with the rest of the PF stuffed into the tender. This engine is probably one of my best runners, decently powerful and will take all manner of curves, switches, and s-bends at full speed without failure. And finally, my rough approximation of the Tornado's cab. I could not fit minifigures inside using the standard LEGO seat piece, but with these custom ones a driver and fireman can sit inside comfortably. I've got a few more pictures of my A1 Peppercorn "Emerald Night" on my Flickr, as well as much larger resolution pictures. Thank you for your time!
  7. Hello all! I've finally gotten around to taking pictures of my BNSF SD40-2 that I built a little over a year ago. Usually I'm a steam engine guy, but all the bright orange BNSF locomotives I saw on my road trips along the Interstate 40 really caught my eye after a while. OF course, there's a pretty good variety of engines that run, and I'm not sure I've actually seen an SD40-2 on my road trips, but this was the loco I chose. I really like the shaping of it and I've always really liked the big porches on the ends. My SD40-2 is powered by 2 L-Motors, one per truck geared down 2:1. This makes it somewhat slow, but very powerful. The PF LiPo battery is hidden upside-down in the center of the engine, with the top of the battery box accessible through a hole in the center of the fuel tank for charging so I never have to disassemble the locomotive. My original design had just barely enough room for a PF IR Receiver, but I instead upgraded it with one of CodeFox's BrickSter Bluetooth controllers, which I really like. One thing I didn't expect going into this was the complexity that would be required to get all the shapes and proportions just right. Building in orange made this even more complicated, but it was a good fun challenge and I really like having such a brightly coloured locomotive. I would have liked to be able to include just a bit more detail on the long hood, but between the 8-stud long tile section in the middle and the massive motors and gearboxes in the rest I couldn't find any good consistent way to do any hatch detailing. Still, I'm happy enough with the shaping of the rest of the engine that it doesn't really bother me. Most of the yellow striping is brick-built, but in the places where there was just no way I used a thin yellow pinstripe sticker I found at Michaels. It colour matches the real LEGO yellow extraordinarily well and one of the stripe sizes perfectly matched up with the thickness of a plate. I'll leave off with this last photo for this post, but if you would like to see more pictures I have plenty more in my Flickr album, including some WIP screenshots of older stages of the design. The album can be seen right here Thanks for your time!
  8. Not many other hobbies have people wanting step by step instructions that can easily take 40+ hours on top of the countless hours put into the design and testing, either. Good instructions for excellent models aren't as simple as taking progress pictures and writing up a blog post. Most of the huge and complex models people want instructions for are an enormous investment in time, so it is understandable for the people who spend the time doing so to want some degree of compensation. Also, a lot of that compensation generally goes towards the next project, which is a win-win for everyone!
  9. This sort of motor and switching method is pretty much exactly what I have been thinking I want to do. Getting a huge high torque motor to fight the switch lock never seemed like the right way to me, especially since it leaves a huge ugly box on the inside of the switch turn that is likely to foul up longer coaches. One other really neat thing with this particular motor and switching method - if you are ballasting your track and your baseplates are built up about the height of the MILS standard, you should be able to hide the entire motor underneath the switch itself!!
  10. I think it's a bit more complicated an expectation. Say that LEGO did go and make a new mold of a very faithful, film-accurate storm trooper rifle and put it in a storm trooper battle pack. Then next wave, here's the new battle pack for Battle Droids. If LEGO puts the storm trooper rifles in for the B1s, it would probably be received worse by the hardcore Star Wars fans than if they just had generic rifles. Down that route, LEGO would have to make a new weapon mold for every unique troop type. The costs of the tooling, the logistics involved in making sure all the troops have the "accurate" weapons, all of that becomes expensive and time consuming. Then there's the other thing - yes, hardcore adult Star Wars fans are a lot more likely to be both interested and able to spend a large amount of money buying tens of dozens of battle packs to army build, but at the end of the day those fans are neither the target audience nor the group that overall brings in the most profit for the line. The kids and the general LEGO Star Wars fans vastly outnumber the true hard-core guys, and for them film-accurate weapons for every fig in a battle pack are, well, not really features that add value. The generic guns work for everyone and are easily interchangeable, and beyond that - from what I remember as a kid and from talking to kids who are really into LEGO Star Wars now - the generic guns are just fine, as far as actual play is concerned just having a gun is as much as they need. Having "generic pistol" and "generic rifle" with the option to add technic half-pins to customize things is fine. That equation will probably never change for LEGO. They're very focused on the play experience, and the ability for parts to have a good amount of re-usability. For 99% of their customers, film-accurate Star Wars guns don't enhance the play experience - so I think they've got little incentive to spend such a large amount of money making minifig-scale scale models of Star Wars guns. That's why 3rd party guys like Brickarms are great. They don't have the same target audience as LEGO and they can offer the more niche items that AFOLs want - yes, they're more expensive, but that's the way supply and demand works. This is the sort of thing I've had to come to terms with as a LEGO train builder. LEGO doesn't make train wheels in all the sizes I need, nor the many different track radii. And they probably won't - for the target audience, the 2 wheel sizes and 1 track radius are more than enough. Big Ben Bricks and ME Models solve both of those problems very well. More expensive, yes - but I realize I'm in a niche and I'm okay to pay that difference.
  11. I actually picked this up as my first 9v train set a couple years ago, and I was really impressed by it. The design seems simple, but it's probably the most fun I've had with play features in a LEGO set in a very long time. Cool to see that you're piecing it back together - good luck with the final stretch!
  12. Unfortunately I think it's gotta be a driver issue with the GTX10XX line. I myself built a new computer earlier this year running Win7 on an Intel 6600K and 16 GB Ram, but I got a GTX 750 Ti to tide me over until I can get a 1080 next year (They weren't out yet when I built it). It seems the common denominator on effected machines is the 10XX line... I guess that's something for me to keep in mind next year! Do you have another video card you can swap in and see if that solves the problem? Edit again: Just had a friend with a GTX 1080 try it out, they're running an older Intel CPU. Same problem shows up as soon as they turn on the outlines, but no problem without. Perhaps you could try running without outlines and see if that solves it for you?
  13. I love it! The N1 Starfigher is one of my favorite Star Wars ship designs, and it's unfortunately one that's rather tough to get looking nice and sleek in LEGO. I think you've adapted Psiaki's design well, and my only 'criticism' is one that applies to Psiaki's original as well: the main engine cylinders just feel way too short. If you look at this massive picture here, the main engine cylinder stretches nearly all the way to the front of the nose before the cone comes into play, and the back of the engines nearly reach the front of the cockpit as well. But, again, I really love this rendition of it and would love the LXF... but the dropbox link doesn't seem to be working at the moment. I guess I'll have to practice what the Skywalker boys never seem to have quite gotten down - patience!!
  14. At this point I can't help but think that this is one of the biggest trolling attempts the Train Tech forum has ever seen. I'm not going to repeat the rather on-the-nose criticism already given to the unique solution you've decided to use; and any further pointers on the general shape of the rest of the bodywork I'm not too keen on sharing at the moment. I don't know if this just a massive troll attempt or an incredibly bad mood due to sleep deprivation and tooth work (Which sucks, I know); but please know that this kind of attitude is not going to ingratiate yourself any with the community you're trying so hard to impress. We have no problem with someone preferring their own work, surely nobody would design their own models in a way they feel is inferior to another's. And every now and then, a model does come along that really does absolutely define what can be done with that model in the LEGO medium and nobody takes umbrage with that. The problem you're running into here is surely almost entirely rooted in the fact that the first 3 paragraphs - a good 75% of your post - is not focused so much on the merits of your own model as it is effectively calling the entire rest of the train community unimaginative and lazy. A community that it is fairly obvious you are very new to and don't know well. Even if this whole attitude and reaction is a facade, and 'we all just don't get the subtle irony of the title', I want to ask you in all honesty: What does this gain you? What are you looking to achieve by acting this way?
  15. I am a huge fan of these engines (In fact I have built two!), and it is very interesting to see your rendition of one of them in 6-wide. It is also very interesting to me that you have built the forward engine as the one rigid to the frame; on the real locos the rear engine is rigid and the front has some very clever articulation for a good wide swing. I'm curious to see how well this design tracks, if you ever do build it. Two things I feel I should point out is that your water tanks aren't tall enough (they should be taller than the top of the boiler), and the front pistons should be noticeably larger than the rear set (Which is what sets a mallet apart from a standard articulated loco). Those are somewhat small asides though to the fact that is is a pretty good 6-wide mallet! Are you planning to ever build it?