Phantom59

Airfix quick build

36 posts in this topic

Hi

what a nonsense! Why using an interlocking technique like Lego on parts that never ever can be used in a different way? If you want scale models, buy Revel or Tamia, if you want to build things with interlocking technique, buy Lego.

Dino

Edited by Darth Dino

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Hi

what a nonsense! Why using an interlocking technique like Lego on parts that never ever can be used in a different way? If you want scale models, buy Revel or Tamia, if you want to build things with interlocking technique, buy Lego.

Dino

In fairness, Airfix has been in the scale-model business a reasonable bit longer than those other companies, but it confuses me as to why they've decided to branch away from the paint-and-glue approach that made them a household name and apparently try and jump on something completely different. And you are right about the contradiction of the core idea - aren't they just going against everything that springs to mind when one thinks of Airfix? :wacko:

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This is a most interesting development. As a child back in the 70's I had many Airfix kits to make (And a few other brands but mostly Airfix.) and whilst these were good, I enjoyed making them but was never really a fan of painting.

I seem to remember that towards the end of my model kit building as a child Matchbox brought out some kits, mostly of WWII stuff and these were supposed to be snap fit and to a degree pre-coloured. The quality was not that good and they were not a patch on the old style Airfix kits, or indeed the real Matchbox kits. But the idea was a good one and appealed to many like me who were into wargames and wanted a set of models that went together quickly and easily and could be used almost straight away.

I assume the Airfix release is an attempt at a similar thing which I imagine as long as the models are reasonable will certainly appeal to wargamers as the range expands. Not everyone who likes making models likes painting them as well. These from what I can see online appear to be a really good attempt. The fact that they may be compatible with other bricks LEGO or otherwise I imagine is simply a bonus as opposed to the main consideration. They probably looked for a way to do it for a while and found this style to be best given its tried and tested format.

If they start bringing out tanks and the like in a reasonable wargaming scale I can see these taking off like hot cakes. If they are just a one off with a few random planes mostly from different eras then probably not so much as they are of limited use.

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In fairness, Airfix has been in the scale-model business a reasonable bit longer than those other companies, but it confuses me as to why they've decided to branch away from the paint-and-glue approach that made them a household name and apparently try and jump on something completely different. And you are right about the contradiction of the core idea - aren't they just going against everything that springs to mind when one thinks of Airfix? :wacko:

It would seem that they are trying to expand their line to appeal to kids who don't have the patience for paint and glue (or their parents who don't want to deal with clean-up), while not seeming too "toy"-like.

In another note, I agree with the reviewer linked to above, that non-LEGO brands are poor performers. I do make an exception, though, with the blocks Tyco made decades ago--the plates and blocks have a satisfying degree of clutch, and the half-height blocks are useful for closing gaps when building with SNOT. The only problems are (1) they are out of production (2) they have the same yellowing effect as LEGO blocks from the same period (3) all of mine have teeth marks on them from when I was a kid :cry_sad:

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Kids don't want to play with glue and build a model they can't play with because they fall apart. The makes things fast and go right to the play point.

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Hi

what a nonsense! Why using an interlocking technique like Lego on parts that never ever can be used in a different way? If you want scale models, buy Revel or Tamia, if you want to build things with interlocking technique, buy Lego.

Dino

Some of the parts are pretty much identical to their LEGO counterparts, and the clutch is pretty good; those parts could easily be used to MOC. Also, one of the reasons for the bizarre shapes of some of the elements is the need to generate the camouflage pattern. On a model without the camouflage pattern the pieces might be more generic.

And incidentally, if I want scale models I'd go for Airfix rather than Revell or Tamiya (definitely the poor relations when I was a kid, although I can't speak for the current situation) !

If they start bringing out tanks and the like in a reasonable wargaming scale I can see these taking off like hot cakes. If they are just a one off with a few random planes mostly from different eras then probably not so much as they are of limited use.

My theory is that Airfix are just testing the water with these 6 Quick Build models; if they sell I guess there's no reason why they couldn't expand the range - bigger planes, tanks, warships etc.. LEGO won't give us these (Sopwith Camel and a couple of others apart) so there is I think a niche....

Dr. D.

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Hmm, interesting.....now we wait for Hornby to release something......almost every toy maker wants to do their own version of Lego.

Looks nice.......er, I might just stay with the tried and true Lego thanks.

Actually I feel that Airfix must have looked at MOC'ed up Lego planes and of course those of the creator range that Lego have been producing in recent years......then they though hey, we could try this too ! :wink:

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what a nonsense! Why using an interlocking technique like Lego on parts that never ever can be used in a different way? If you want scale models, buy Revel or Tamia, if you want to build things with interlocking technique, buy Lego.

In fairness, Airfix has been in the scale-model business a reasonable bit longer than those other companies, but it confuses me as to why they've decided to branch away from the paint-and-glue approach that made them a household name and apparently try and jump on something completely different. And you are right about the contradiction of the core idea - aren't they just going against everything that springs to mind when one thinks of Airfix? :wacko:

I agree with the above statements. This seems to be intended to be a transitioning system for older kids who are growing out of the Lego age and into the glue-and-paint model age. However, I fail to see the point of the studs seeing as most of the parts aren't interchangeable. I think Revell's SnapTite system of models that simply snap together makes a lot more sense.

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Must be an Euro thing, because I've never heard of this company before, and I've built plenty of scaled models in my youth.

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what a nonsense! Why using an interlocking technique like Lego on parts that never ever can be used in a different way?

Well, Airfix and similar models aren't meant to be disassembled and rebuilt in different ways - but you can kitbash them from the start if that's what you want to do. That possibility isn't here, but as others have said this is certainly for children who want to grow up to plastic scale models but don't really have the patience for it.

However, I fail to see the point of the studs seeing as most of the parts aren't interchangeable. I think Revell's SnapTite system of models that simply snap together makes a lot more sense.

A few years ago, I got a couple of those Revell quick-build things, and they were fun (I seem to recall certain parts wouldn't stay in place, though). I think the point of studs is so the models can be easily put back together if broken (which is not the case with the Revell kits in my experience). Also, as you say, this product is probably for children who are stuck between LEGO and Airfix on the plastic-kit spectrum. No doubt studs are familiar to those children so these quick-build kits are easy to work with.

Clever move by Airfix - I can see the market's there, but it's not my cup of tea. But we are definitely not the target audience.

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Crazy its no longer Airfix, On a side note,

I would always go Tamiya for model kits I'm a big fan and have had many of there 1/10 radio controlled kits and some of there other kits, and loved them.

Hmm, interesting.....now we wait for Hornby to release something......almost every toy maker wants to do their own version of Lego.

Looks nice.......er, I might just stay with the tried and true Lego thanks.

Actually I feel that Airfix must have looked at MOC'ed up Lego planes and of course those of the creator range that Lego have been producing in recent years......then they though hey, we could try this too ! :wink:

Hornby has done twice once a long time ago, they made a Scalextric car that could be built on to using LEGO bricks, this never went into production due to copyright laws and then they have recently re done it and released

http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=83116

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Maybe the Kids nowadays are not into plastic gluing and painting anymore. They probably don't have the patience for it.

In order to keep up Airfix is trying a different approach. Not to replicate Lego per se, but to lower the bar on assembling model kits.

If I am not mistaken Revell has a product line with quick assembly as well.

My two cents, could be entirely wrong.

A few years ago, I got a couple of those Revell quick-build things, and they were fun (I seem to recall certain parts wouldn't stay in place, though). I think the point of studs is so the models can be easily put back together if broken (which is not the case with the Revell kits in my experience). Also, as you say, this product is probably for children who are stuck between LEGO and Airfix on the plastic-kit spectrum. No doubt studs are familiar to those children so these quick-build kits are easy to work with.

Clever move by Airfix - I can see the market's there, but it's not my cup of tea. But we are definitely not the target audience.

Exactly what I think :thumbup:

If you don't compare this with Lego too much, I actually like the idea.

The paint and glue is fun, but it's not suitable for every kid.

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If I am not mistaken Revell has a product line with quick assembly as well.

My two cents, could be entirely wrong.

Keep your two cents :laugh: :

Revell_22.jpg

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Keep your two cents :laugh: :

:laugh:

Ahhh indeed, the Star Wars easykits. Was looking for some SW models some time ago, only to find out that there aren't many kits, besides the easykits.

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Must be an Euro thing, because I've never heard of this company before, and I've built plenty of scaled models in my youth.

I'm an American, but one who spent a lot of his youth in Europe (Air Force brat, here), and I can assure you Airfix is a very well-known name to hobbyists across the pond. I actually suspect they're the best-known manufacturer of plastic model kits over there by a considerable margin.

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I will actually buy both the Spit and the 109, I have a serious soft spot for Spitfires and at £9.99 they are cheap and look good.

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Must be an Euro thing, because I've never heard of this company before, and I've built plenty of scaled models in my youth.

Guess you didn't grow-up in 1970s Britain then. :grin:

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By no means I am an expert, but I've built my share of scale models. However, this is the first time I've heard of Airfix. In The Netherlands it's mostly Revell and Tamiya. But I could be completely wrong :look:

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By no means I am an expert, but I've built my share of scale models. However, this is the first time I've heard of Airfix. In The Netherlands it's mostly Revell and Tamiya. But I could be completely wrong :look:

Airfix is mainly a UK thing, though they have been available for quite some time now in the Netherlands (if I remeber correctly the local store in my home town carried the boxed kits when I was a kid, that was in the eighties!). They have never been that big on the continent. I have been an avid model builder too, found Hasegawa to be the best make for kits, these days it's Hobby and Academy that have taken ofer that baton I think. Stopped building them in the early nineties though, tried one a few years ago but found the painting too much of a hassle...

Easy kits have been on the market for quite some time now. Aimed mostly I think at kids that are nog yet ready for the real thing. I have found them mostly disappointing, fitting was always a problem and paintschemes did almost never align well. These Airfix kits seem to be quite ok, maybe I will try one is available over here (one of the shops I sometimes visit carries Arifix).

Bit weird though that they went for such a direct copy of Lego, maybe it's also testing the waters for a line of more lego-like kits.

Edited by jfbat

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Airfix are legendary! They have been going since the 1940's and pretty much set the standard that all other newer company's followed. I've built a few myself but prefer to collect the die-cast Corgi Aviation models.

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Airfix are legendary!

Yes they are! As I was growing up my house smelled constantly of paint thinners and plastic adhesive and razor blades were used recklessly! I think nowadays that with that environment, both Child Services and a Hazmat team would have been called in.

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