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Kumpelkante

CCCX Winter Scene: River Thames Frost Fair

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This is my Entry for the Winter scene category. According to Wikipedia:

"River Thames frost fairs were held on the Tideway of the River Thames at London between the 15th and 19th centuries, during the period known as the Little Ice Age, when the river froze over. "

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Frost_fair

8199525238_49a24a2907_m.jpg

winter1hr von tobiasgeserick auf Flickr

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winter2hr von tobiasgeserick auf Flickr

8198432779_6b693e110e_m.jpg

winter3hr von tobiasgeserick auf Flickr

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Very nice, you can post slightly bigger pictures though, 400x 600 is a good size.

Good luck in the competition.

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Looks very realistic :thumbup: The numerous figs all look great and I :wub: the shark wrapped in a net. Good luck in the CCC :classic:

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Nice job! Lots of very nice little details, and I like the way you made the doors (edit: gates, really) with nothing behind them, somehow it strikes me as very unique! :thumbup:

Edited by Kai NRG

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Nice job! Lots of very nice little details, and I like the way you made the doors (edit: gates, really) with nothing behind them, somehow it strikes me as very unique! :thumbup:

Actually the Moc takes place on the frozen river Thames (or a section of it). So these gates arent gates at all, but the (visible) section of a bridge that is used for the background. Maybe i should put more work into that the next time i build something similar. But thanks for the comments and apprecietion anyway. (to the other posters as well)

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Actually the Moc takes place on the frozen river Thames (or a section of it). So these gates arent gates at all, but the (visible) section of a bridge that is used for the background. Maybe i should put more work into that the next time i build something similar. But thanks for the comments and apprecietion anyway. (to the other posters as well)

:look: I didn't get that at first (though I did read it - is that good or bad? :tongue: ), maybe because of the hight of the bridge compared to the river? Since the ice is (theoretically) on the surface of the Thames, maybe it could have been a little lower? I like it how it is though anyways! :grin:

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:look: I didn't get that at first (though I did read it - is that good or bad? :tongue: ), maybe because of the hight of the bridge compared to the river? Since the ice is (theoretically) on the surface of the Thames, maybe it could have been a little lower? I like it how it is though anyways! :grin:

you are right. the brigde is pretty high compared to moc-standarts. otherwise it was planned that way for boats to fit under the arches (if the river was not frozen). also bridges in my city are of a similar hight compared to humans... or think of tower bridge and rialto bridge...

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you are right. the brigde is pretty high compared to moc-standarts. otherwise it was planned that way for boats to fit under the arches (if the river was not frozen). also bridges in my city are of a similar hight compared to humans... or think of tower bridge and rialto bridge...

Whilst the buildings on Old London Bridge varied quite considerably over the 700 years it was in existance the majority of the arches remained the same (one or two did fall down and were replaced hence the nursery rhyme "London Bridge is falling down"). In general the arches varied between 20 and 30ft (appox. 6 to 9m) the entire bridge itself being around 900ft (appox. 275m) in length. The arches need to be 31ft (9.3m) above low water at neap tides, bearing in mind that the Thames is a tidal river and rises and falls around 23ft (7m) at London Bridge. Indeed the old piers used to restrict the river so much that there could be as much as an 8ft (2.4m) drop between the upriver and downriver sides of the bridge which meant that "shooting the bridge" (passing between the piers of the arches) was fraught with danger and there were regular fatalities.

The seminal reference tome is Old London Bridge, Gordon Home, published by John Lane The Bodley Head, 1931, although Old London Bridge, Patricia Pierce is a more recent work and more likely to be found on Amazon or similar bookstores. Living in London I did once consider doing a full Minifig scale MOC of Old London Bridge but abandoned the project when I realised that it would be at least 25 baseplates long or 20ft (6m) real world length. Maybe one day when I have a bigger room...

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