TheBrickster

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TRAIN TECH Help, General Questions & Talk to the Staff

308 posts in this topic

Hi Juzo, My nipples are burning.

PF track is basically 9-volt track with the metal conducting rails replaced with solid plastic. They clip seamlessly together. However, there is a large market for straight 9-volt tracks so you could recover part of your expenses by selling them and replacing them with PF-tracks.

The train shed was designed for 6-stud wide trains, so most of the official LEGO trains will fit, no problem. However, the Emerald Night is the exception because it is 7-studs wide at the cab and 8-studs wide at the running gear. Looks like that locomotive will have to sleep outside... That being said the 10027 train shed is a great kit, one of my favorites (I only wish I had bought multipules) so you shouldn't let the fact that the Emerald Night doesn't fit keep you from getting it. Its price on the second-hand market could be another thing...

Dan-147

Sorry about that comment. I did not write that part, some malicious hacker is at work. I cannot edit my original post.

Dan-147

Haha, that's all right mate. Thanks for the response.

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Hello, I have been collecting 9v trains for a long time now and I have done multiple displays with my local LUG. I finally have the room at my house to make my own display. I have recently started collecting monorail (6399 and have one of each of the accessory track sets), and was wondering if anyone has run monorail above 9v track, and if they have, what they used for their supports to hold the monorail track above the 9v track. The standard height under the supports and elevated station for 6399 are too low, so the station will need to be raised with a minor mod. I am having trouble coming up with a sturdy solution for the supports though, to go around my oval of 9v track, that also looks decent. Any help/suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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hi,

How can I connect some track pieces to the flatter track but have these ones slope up?

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hi,

How can I connect some track pieces to the flatter track but have these ones slope up?

not sure what your asking but, keep it a shallow slope. use only 1 plate height differnce to start the slope with in a track piece (16 studs) then 2 plates height change each 16 studs after that. and that should be fine for most trains to climb.

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Hi all. I've got an easy-to-answer question.

I'm looking into getting into LEGO Trains. I just don't know if I should use 12v or PF.

Are most LEGO Trains PF? Or 12v? Could you give me a few pros and cons on each?

I don't want to start a huge debate, but if you could answer those questions that'd be great!

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Hi all. I've got an easy-to-answer question.

I'm looking into getting into LEGO Trains. I just don't know if I should use 12v or PF.

Are most LEGO Trains PF? Or 12v? Could you give me a few pros and cons on each?

I don't want to start a huge debate, but if you could answer those questions that'd be great!

All the current sets are PF so that makes it a lot easier and cheaper to collect them.

The 12V trains stopped being made in the 80's so they are now rare and collectable. After the 12V trains LEGO made the 9V trains they are less rare but also very collectable. Over time the detail of the trains has increased so unless you have a nostalgic connection to the older trains it doesn't make much sense to collect them.

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All the current sets are PF so that makes it a lot easier and cheaper to collect them.

The 12V trains stopped being made in the 80's so they are now rare and collectable. After the 12V trains LEGO made the 9V trains they are less rare but also very collectable. Over time the detail of the trains has increased so unless you have a nostalgic connection to the older trains it doesn't make much sense to collect them.

Thank you! I probably could've easily discovered that with research, but I guess I felt lazy.

I really appreciate it! :thumbup:

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I was thinking about gathering the parts for two Super Chief cars, one baggage and one observation car. Has anyone else tried this? I am guessing they will probably cost $100 each.

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Over time the detail of the trains has increased so unless you have a nostalgic connection to the older trains it doesn't make much sense to collect them.

I think this may be up for debate. Some of the 12v sets had lots of detail and/or a very high (re)playability, same goes for 9v. Personally I was very disappointed with the level of detail offered by the first RC and PF train sets, especially the ones with the huge new ugly pieces for fronts and roofs, they are very un-LEGO like and make it difficult to build other things out of single sets.

- Sok.

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I think this may be up for debate. Some of the 12v sets had lots of detail and/or a very high (re)playability, same goes for 9v. Personally I was very disappointed with the level of detail offered by the first RC and PF train sets, especially the ones with the huge new ugly pieces for fronts and roofs, they are very un-LEGO like and make it difficult to build other things out of single sets.

- Sok.

While I agree to some extent (especially about the RC train large nose piece) I think the detail of Emerald Night and Maersk train is clearly better than Santa Fe, which is better than most other 9V trains or 7740 etc, so there is a clear trend there. The cargo train sets are a bit more up and down, but given the price differential, unless you have a really strong drive such as nostalgia, the older drive systems are far less attractive to a new purchaser. That doesn't mean I think it's not worth converting some of the older trains to PF, but only that to build a reasonable collection it's far easier and cheaper to start with what's currently available. 9V had some pretty ugly trains IMHO too, 4511, 4559, 4560 are all less appealing to me than the current passenger train for example.

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Hi - a couple of quick and easy questions for any one who's tried it...

I'm tempted to get back into LEGO trains via the Maersk, but my set-up is entirely grey era / 12v and I don't fancy shelling out for a load of new track:

- will the motor happily go round on the grey track without having any traction problems?

- is there an issue with clearance under the motor / model / trucks running over the 12v conducting rails?

Any guidance would be appreciated before I shell out for the set!

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Hello PeteM! I have not personally tried running PF on 12v track but from everything I've seen and heard, your Maersk engine should run problem-free.

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Hello PeteM! I have not personally tried running PF on 12v track but from everything I've seen and heard, your Maersk engine should run problem-free.

That's great, just what I was hoping! Thanks for the reply - think I'll be heading off to the nearest Lego shop after payday! :)

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Hi,

Just bought the maersk as my first train and have almost no track ( I have one set of 7499 which I use for a tram in our town layout). I also ordered some PF kit from bricklink to power it.

I can't seem to find any curved track on Lego.com - is it all flexible track nowadays? Also bricklink seems expensive for straight RC track, so it seems cheaper to just buy a few packs of 7499.

How would you recommend getting a very basic layout started - just an oval would be ok to start with. The flexible track in 7499 doesn't seem to even make a 90 degree turn so it'd take lots to make an oval.

Edited by mrklaw

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Hi there!

Although I was willing to, I didn't buy any of the 2010 train sets (too many real life changes going on at the same time, but I managed to leave my Lego Dark Ages anyway).

I haven't bought the Maersk Train from last year too, and I'm not sure I'll be able to get it at this point.

Anyway, how long does it take for new train sets to be released? The non-exclusives, I mean.

Should I try and buy whichever -- or my favorite -- train set as soon as I can or should I wait a bit to see what's coming this fall or maybe next year?

I'm sorry if this sounds like a dumb question. Although I really like the train sets and read all the reviews, I'm not very keen about the theme, news about it and new set releases.

P.S.: On the side -- the 7937 Train Station is in my 2012 to buy list even though I may not be getting any train sets. Is this a good buy or should I wait for the new station too? Yes, I know how strange this sounds, but I think the station looks cool in any Lego city :thumbup:

EDIT: Thanks for moving my post to this thread. Sorry! :blush:

Edited by Artifex
Moved question to TRAIN TECH LEGO Train Questions

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Hi there!

Hi Artifex. I was hoping one of our Train fans would answer your question but since no one has responded, let me try:

There's a topic here in Train Tech called Discontinuation Speculation. It talks about set availability including the Maersk, a very nice Cargo Train I may add. Train fan MojoLego also created a nice graph that depicts the life/availability of 9V and newer trains. Generally, the life of a train seems to be around 2-3 years depending on how well the train sells. You never know what or how many future train sets LEGO will release. Trains have been doing pretty well over the past several years, but prior to that, LEGO seemed to release a new train every few years.

From experience, I would not wait too long if you like the Maersk or one of the City Trains.

7937 Train Station is a neat set. I like the pedestrian bridge that goes over the train/track. It adds a lot of play value and detail to a tabletop layout. There will always be a new station so if you like it, I would recommend you buy it now. Good luck with your decision.

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Anyway, how long does it take for new train sets to be released? The non-exclusives, I mean.

P.S.: On the side -- the 7937 Train Station is in my 2012 to buy list even though I may not be getting any train sets. Is this a good buy or should I wait for the new station too? Yes, I know how strange this sounds, but I think the station looks cool in any Lego city :thumbup:

This is a bit of a hard question to answer but I'll give it a go. Historically it has been rare that trains get released more frequently than once every three to four years. We had the current yellow cargo train and passenger train released in 2010, so they are due to be replaced in 2013-2014, if history serves as a good guide.

At the moment we've seen more trains than for a very long time. In particular we had the red cargo train released in 2011, I've been told it is intended to replace the yellow cargo train when its production ends, which might mean trains are selling particularly well. Perhaps we will see more trains sooner than history predicts but I doubt it, in January the new lead City designer said he hadn't looked at trains yet since he was concentrating on the themes that were next to be refreshed. That suggests new trains were about two years away at least if the lead times for other sets hold true.

If you like the current station I'd buy it, since it could be a while before you see another, and stock for the current one may become harder to find (at least in some markets like Australia).

Edit: Sorry Brickster, your post happened while I was writing my own.

Edited by peterab

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Edit: Sorry Brickster, your post happened while I was writing my own.

Not a problem - good answer for the benefit of a new train fan. :thumbup:

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Thanks a lot, guys! Appreciated! Your answers were very enlightening! :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:

I'll think on what to do next -- what train/sets to get or not to get -- and know you that you helped me a lot with the decision, whatever it turns out to be!

Thank you! :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:

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I know this has been brought up before but, does anybody know how to make the Emerald Night run smoother with 9V. Every time I run it the engine itself is dragging.

I put the 9V motor under the passenger car. Without the engine itself it can push the coal car, and pull another passenger. When I put the engine on it just slows it down so much when it comes to turns.

If anyone can direct me to the correct thread or if anybody knows how to fix it, that would be awesome.

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Been on the forums for a few days, I've done a search for scale tech and can't seem to find it in the train resource guide.

What are the different scales mention here, I've figured out n scale is narrow to which I suppose it's 4 wide?, I hear of HO, G scales also without any idea what they are.

I have an ancient 9v setup so which scale would I be looking at?

Can any 4.5/12/9/RC be run with any scale, or What do builders usually stick with?

Thanks.

EDIT: Rather than a new post, I'll add to Frank STENGEL posts jsut below with this from Wikipedia on scale information.

Wikipedia on Scales

L gauge 1:38 (nominal) 38 Unofficial designation of toy trains built from LEGO. Equipment can be built to differing widths in relation to the track gauge, and are becoming increasingly popular among persons who grew up with the building toy system.

I would love to see if someone who has a good idea on scales could get a few images put together of train/city set ups with different scales to give everyone a image of what it actually looks like.

Edited by funkdis

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Strickly speaking LEGO we don't talk scale (HO, O, G, N, etc)in gauges as those are commercial model railroad scales. Lego 6-wide is often times referred to as L Gauge.

In the world of LEGO Trains the scale we commonly speak is X (Studs) Wide.

Standard TLG Train Models are all 6-Wide meaning the engine & rolling stock are build on bases thatnare six studs wide. It looks like the new mining sets have some small ore trains that are only 4-Wide (just like the old Indiana Jones Temple of Doom ore car set).

Some AFOL Train buildes have built in scales ranging fron 1-Wide to 12-Wide!

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If you want to compute the scale your lego train ends up as you can use that converter.

As it turns out, the standard leco scale is somewere around 1:42. That means that the standard Lego trains are narrow and the rails very wide. To build trains that are somehow to scale one ends up with engines that are 8 studs wide and rolling stock that is 7-8 wide.

Still, this results in trains that have a very wide wheel base.

If one uses the rail width as a base, one ends up with a scale of 1:30 and a rolling stock that is about 10 wide. At that scale, the minifigs are rather small people (less that 150 cm or 5 feet)

Anyway, the main problem remains curve radii: Lego rails have a ludicrously small turn radius...

In my (rather uninformed) opinion trying to build to an exact scale is bound to failure. However building and keeping the proportions right while having the train run through curves is a fun challenge...

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Hi,

as mentioned before, LEGO train track is 6 studs wide. And it is up to the builder creating locos and other rolling stock in various width. LEGO themselves build trains normally 6 studs wide (consider it is a toy train targeting 6-10 year olds). LEGO fans do indeed prefer more realistic looking width for LEGO trains. Wider trains makes them become longer and heavier ... And the LEGO track curves are a nightmare for good looking trains.

If space is no problem, you can solve the curve issue by using strack track pieces and build a gigantic curve:

Oversized Image Removed

Such a layout give a great chance to run 7/8-wide LEGO trains.

Some more links:



Holger

Edited by TheBrickster
Oversized Image Removed

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