"LL"

Ishtar Gate

22 posts in this topic

My first model of something real. Istar gate doesn't exists now. There are a lot of reconstructions of it.

I don't know if they are Lego models of this ancient monument, so if you saw some, please let me know.

8023969606_7a5d2b92f7.jpg

Ishtar Gate by 'LL', on Flickr

Cheers,

Lukasz

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:oh: Impressive build! The hands used as decorations look great :thumbup: The arch is superb as well :thumbup:

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Very impressive!

I am curious about some of the interesting techniques used. Are the plates in the arch held by gravity / friction, like the way they used to make stone arches? How are the hand decorations connected to the wall?

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I think I remember this one from a game, but can't remember what game :wacko:

Anyway, I love the effects you have made, like the decorations on the walls and the battlements!

Great job!

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Beautiful MOC. There's so many fantastic building techniques used...I think I'm just gonna observe for a while. :wub_drool:

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Great job, it looks really nice!

Just like Kristel I'm also interested in knowing how you managed with some of the connections, especially the hands.

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Thanks for comments!

"Are the plates in the arch held by gravity / friction, like the way they used to make stone arches?'

Plates are connected to wall.

"How are the hand decorations connected to the wall?"

"Just like Kristel I'm also interested in knowing how you managed with some of the connections, especially the hands."

That is very good question. They are connected to minifig torso (placed SNOT), but old, not new. Check the difference between them by looking inside torso.

Edited by "LL"

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Wow. I'm very impressed by what you've done with your minifigure hands. :thumbup: That curve in the gate is great too.

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Actually the real thing still exists (at least in parts). It was discovered by German Archeologist some 100 years or so ago and then transfered to Berlin where you can see a reconstruction of it using some of the origignal tiles in the Pergamon Museum. And it's really impressive I have to say. When I was a student in Berlin I actually went there rather often.

Said said, I thik you did a superb job with your depiction. It's instantly recocniseable and carried out rather well. I especially like how you did the yellow animal decorations on the walls. Fantastic build!

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Yes, the use of the minifig hands as decoration was very ingenious. You could probably used some more yellow (gold) bricks at the top, but other than that it's almost identical to the real thing!

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I always adore realistic architectural designs in MOCs, and your Gate is a great example of these! The color scheme and SNOT works perfectly, and minifig hands make a nice design! However, I'm sorry for the poor figures (when I'm trying to make designs out of hands, it becomes very hard to build a simply complete minifig! :classic: )

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That is very good question. They are connected to minifig torso (placed SNOT), but old, not new. Check the difference between them by looking inside torso.

Thanks, LL.

I can see how it is done now. Very clever!

Kristel

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Amazing MOC, this building seems easy to build but things are not like they seem! :sweet:

Wonderful decorations and great snot technique on the top of the gate! :wub:

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Fantastic design! You really captured the subject.

This was my favorite display at the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, and it always brings back fond memories when I see an animal tile or two at museums around the world. Your mic has done the same for me. Well done!

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Very elegant reconstruction, LL. That's a clever technique used for the animal friezes too. Lovely work! :classic:

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